nep-lam New Economics Papers
on Central and South America
Issue of 2022‒07‒25
six papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Wealth in Latin America By Nestor Gandelman; Rodrigo Lluberas
  2. A multidimensional approach to measuring economic insecurity: the case of Chile By Prieto Suarez, Joaquin
  3. Trust towards migrants By Nestor Gandelman; Diego Lamé
  4. Unveiling the Cosmic Race: Racial Inequalities in Latin America * By Luis Guillermo Woo-Mora
  5. The Inequality (or the Growth) we Measure: Data Gaps and the Distribution of Incomes By Facundo Alvaredo; Mauricio de Rosa; Ignacio Flores; Marc Morgan
  6. Igualdad de oportunidades educativas: un indicador sencillo para América Latina By Gasparini, Leonardo; Laguinge, Luis; Ciaschi, Matías; Guido Neidhöfer

  1. By: Nestor Gandelman (Universidad ORT Uruguay. Facultad de Administración y Ciencias Sociales. Departamento de Economía); Rodrigo Lluberas (Universidad ORT Uruguay. Facultad de Administración y Ciencias Sociales. Departamento de Economía)
    Abstract: This paper presents harmonized indicators for household wealth, its components, and its determinants (including intergenerational mobility) in four Latin American countries (Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Uruguay), using Spain as a comparison benchmark. It is based on recently available microdata from financial surveys. The paper analyzes the relationship between wealth indicators and sociodemographic characteristics of household heads (age, education, gender, marital status).
    Keywords: wealth, income, distribution, Latin America
    Date: 2022–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:avs:wpaper:133&r=
  2. By: Prieto Suarez, Joaquin
    Abstract: This paper proposes a strategy to measure economic insecurity in countries in the Global South. It builds a 'Multidimensional Economic Insecurity Index' (MEII) that combines four indicators of economic vulnerability that cause stress and anxiety: unexpected economic shocks, unprotected employment or non-workers in the household, over-indebtedness and asset poverty. The index offers a measure that directly relates economic uncertainty to stress and anxiety due to the lack of protection and buffers to face an unexpected economic shock. The MEII is applied to Chile using Survey of Household Finances (SHF) cross-sectional data (2007, 2011, 2014 and 2017). The results show that (i) about half of the Chilean households experienced, on average, two or more economic vulnerabilities during the last decade with an intensity of 2.3 vulnerabilities, and (ii) economic insecurity affects households on the entire income distribution, even in the highest income deciles groups. By identifying the groups of households most affected by economic insecurity and its trend in recent years, applying the MEII in countries such as Chile provides relevant information to monitor, evaluate and improve social safety nets besides labour market regulations.
    Keywords: economic insecurity; Global South; multidimensional index; survey of households finances; well-being; GP1\100170; Springer deal
    JEL: D63 I31
    Date: 2022–04–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:114623&r=
  3. By: Nestor Gandelman (Universidad ORT Uruguay. Facultad de Administración y Ciencias Sociales. Departmento de Economía); Diego Lamé
    Abstract: Using a standard trust game, we elicit trust and reciprocity measures in a representative sample of adult players in Montevideo, the capital city of Uruguay, a country that exhibits relatively better levels of tolerance towards migrants than other Latin American countries. We find no statistically significant differences in trust levels of Uruguayans towards countrymen versus migrants. In reciprocity, we find only marginally significant differences attributable to the nationality of the players.
    Keywords: Trust, Reciprocity, Experimental games, Migrations
    JEL: C9 J15
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:avs:wpaper:128&r=
  4. By: Luis Guillermo Woo-Mora (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: This paper uses skin tone and income information for over a hundred thousand individuals across 31 Latin American countries to study racial inequalities during the last decade. First, I estimate the welfare consequences of racial inequality. Subnational regions with higher income inequality between racial groups have worse economic development. Next, I provide evidence of a skin tone income premium. In an eleven-color palette, each darker shade in skin tone on average leads to a 3% decrease in income, with heterogeneity across countries. My analysis suggests racial discrimination is the main mechanism behind this income premium.
    Keywords: Race,Inequality,Economic Development,Discrimination
    Date: 2022–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-03693205&r=
  5. By: Facundo Alvaredo (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, WIL - World Inequality Lab , INET - Institut National des Etudes Territoriales); Mauricio de Rosa (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, WIL - World Inequality Lab , UDELAR - Universidad de la República [Montevideo]); Ignacio Flores (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, WIL - World Inequality Lab , CUNY - City University of New York [New York]); Marc Morgan (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, WIL - World Inequality Lab , University of Geneva [Switzerland])
    Abstract: There is a large gap between income estimates used in inequality studies and macroeconomic statistics. This makes it hard to assess how economic growth is distributed across the population, and to what extent mainstream distributional statistics are an accurate representation of income flows. We take stock of these discrepancies by confronting estimates of the income distribution from surveys, administrative records and aggregates from the system of national accounts, thoroughly documenting them over the past two decades for ten Latin American countries. We find that surveys only account for around half of the macroeconomic income in the region. Measurement gaps account for just over half of the overall gap on average, while the rest is due to conceptual differences across data sets. Measurement gaps have been growing fast for many countries, the bulk being due to non-covered capital income. We also compare the top tails in administrative data and surveys, finding diverging averages-especially for non-wage incomes-and different shapes. We discuss the degree to which inequality levels and trends could be affected.
    Keywords: Surveys,national accounts,administrative data,data gaps,income distribution,Latin America
    Date: 2022–06–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-03693223&r=
  6. By: Gasparini, Leonardo; Laguinge, Luis; Ciaschi, Matías; Guido Neidhöfer
    Abstract: Este documento presenta estimaciones para América Latina de un indicador simple de igualdad de oportunidades educativas que mide el grado en que las variables de entorno familiar (ingreso y educación de los padres) dan cuenta del avance escolar de los niños y jóvenes. Se encuentra que el grado de igualdad de oportunidades es casi pleno entre los niños y se reduce de manera significativa entre los jóvenes de 13 a 19 años y todavía más entre los de 20 a 25 años. En términos históricos, el indicador refleja que el grado de igualdad de oportunidades se redujo/estancó en la década de 1990 y aumentó en las últimas dos décadas.
    Keywords: Desarrollo, Economía, Educación, Familia, Investigación socioeconómica, Jóvenes, Niñez,
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:dbl:dblwop:1834&r=

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