nep-lam New Economics Papers
on Central and South America
Issue of 2017‒07‒09
two papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Perception of Corruption and Public Support for Redistribution in Latin America By Esther Hauk; Monica Oviedo; Xavier Ramos
  2. Populism and the Economics of Globalization By Rodrik, Dani

  1. By: Esther Hauk; Monica Oviedo; Xavier Ramos
    Abstract: This paper studies the relationship between people's beliefs about the quality of their institutions, as measured by corruption perceptions, and preferences for redistribution in Latin America. Our empirical study is guided by a theoretical model which introduces taxes into Foellmi and Oechslin's (2007) general equilibrium model of non-collusive corruption. In this model perceived corruption influences people's preferences for redistribution through two channels. On the one hand it undermines trust in government, which reduces people's support for redistribution. On the other hand, more corruption decreases own wealth relative to average wealth of below-average-wealth individuals leading to a higher demand for redistribution. Thus, the effect of perceived corruption on redistribution cannot be signed a priori. Our novel empirical findings for Latin America suggest that perceiving corruption in the public sector increases people's support for redistribution. Although the positive channel dominates in the data, we also find evidence for the negative channel from corruption to demand for redistribution via reduced trust.
    Keywords: preference for redistribution, perception of corruption, political trust, bribery, Latin America
    JEL: D31 D63 H1 H2 P16
    Date: 2017–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bge:wpaper:974&r=lam
  2. By: Rodrik, Dani
    Abstract: Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.
    Keywords: Globalization; populism
    JEL: G02
    Date: 2017–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12119&r=lam

This nep-lam issue is ©2017 by Maximo Rossi. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.