nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2022‒03‒14
three papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Covid-19 and a Green Recovery? By Aditya Goenka; Lin Liu; Manh-Hung Nguyen
  2. The further economic consequences of Brexit: energy By Michael Pollitt
  3. Air pollution in an urban world: A global view on density, cities and emissions By David Castells-Quintana; Elisa Dienesch; Melanie Krause

  1. By: Aditya Goenka (University of Birmingham [Birmingham]); Lin Liu (University of Liverpool); Manh-Hung Nguyen (TSE - Toulouse School of Economics - UT1 - Université Toulouse 1 Capitole - Université Fédérale Toulouse Midi-Pyrénées - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Preliminary evidence indicates that pollution increases the severity and likelihood of COVID-19 infections similar to many other infectious diseases. This paper models the inter-action of pollution and disease preventive actions, either pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions, on transmission of infectious diseases in a neoclassical growth framework. There are two externalities – households do not take into account how their actions affect disease transmission, and productive activity results in pollution which increases the likelihood of in-fections. The disease dynamics are modeled to be of SIS type. We study the difference in health and economic outcomes between the decentralized economy, where households do not internalize externalities, and socially optimal outcomes, and characterize the taxes and subsi-dies that decentralize the latter. Thus, we examine the question whether there are sufficient incentives to reduce pollution, at both private and public levels, once its effects on disease transmission is considered. In competitive outcomes, pollution increases with increased pro-ductivity. The socially efficient outcome has higher pollution than a competitive outcome, despite increase in abatement, as the effect of higher productivity and larger labor supply dom-inates. The results question the hopes of a Green Recovery.
    Keywords: Green Recovery,Infectious disease,Pollution: environmental policy,Covid-19,Dynamic Pigovian taxes
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03537969&r=
  2. By: Michael Pollitt (EPRG, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge)
    JEL: L94
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:enp:wpaper:eprg2120&r=
  3. By: David Castells-Quintana (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, AQR-IREA); Elisa Dienesch (IEP Aix-en-Provence - Sciences Po Aix - Institut d'études politiques d'Aix-en-Provence, AMSE - Aix-Marseille Sciences Economiques - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Melanie Krause (University of Hamburg)
    Abstract: In this paper, we take a global view at air pollution looking at cities and countries worldwide. We pay special attention at the spatial distribution of population and its relationship with the evolution of emissions. To do so, we build i) a unique and large dataset for more than 1200 (big) cities around the world, combining data on emissions of CO2 and PM2.5 with satellite data on built-up areas, population and light intensity at night at the grid-cell level for the last two decades, and ii) a large dataset for more than 190 countries with data from 1960 to 2010. At the city level, we find that denser cities show lower emissions per capita. We also find evidence for the importance of the spatial structure of the city, with polycentricity being associated with lower emissions in the largest urban areas, while monocentricity being more beneficial for smaller cities. In sum, our results suggest that the size and structure of urban areas matters when studying the density-emissions relationship. This is reinforced by results using our country-level data where we find that higher density in urban areas is associated with lower emissions per capita. All our main findings are robust to several controls and different specifications and estimation techniques, as well as different identification strategies.
    Keywords: Density,Pollution,Cities,City structure,Development
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03361637&r=

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