nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2018‒01‒15
two papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Willingness to Pay for Clean Air in China By Richard Freeman; Wenquan Liang; Ran Song; Christopher Timmins
  2. Property Rights, Land Misallocation and Agricultural Efficiency in China By A.V. Chari; Elaine Liu; Shing-Yi Wang; Yongxiang Wang

  1. By: Richard Freeman; Wenquan Liang; Ran Song; Christopher Timmins
    Abstract: We develop a residential sorting model incorporating migration disutility to recover the implicit value of clean air in China. The model is estimated using China Population Census Data along with PM2.5 satellite data. Our study provides new evidence on the willingness to pay for air quality improvement in developing countries and is the first application of an equilibrium sorting model to the valuation of non-market amenities in China. We employ two novel instrumental variables based on coal-fired electricity generation and wind direction to address the endogeneity of local air pollution. Results suggest important differences between the residential sorting model and a conventional hedonic model, highlighting the role of moving costs and the discreteness of the choice set. Our sorting results indicate that the economic value of air quality improvement associated with a one-unit decline in PM2.5 concentration is up to $8.83 billion for all Chinese households in 2005.
    JEL: Q51 Q53 R23
    Date: 2017–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24157&r=res
  2. By: A.V. Chari (University of Sussex); Elaine Liu (University of Houston); Shing-Yi Wang (University of Pennsylvania); Yongxiang Wang (University of Southern California)
    Abstract: This paper examines the impact of a property rights reform in rural China that allowed farmers to lease out their land. We find the reform led to increases in land rental activity in rural households. Consistent with a model of transaction costs in land markets, our results indicate that the formalization of leasing rights resulted in a redistribution of land toward more productive farmers. Consequently, the aggregate productivity of land increased significantly. We also find that the reform increased the responsiveness of land allocation across crops to changes in crop prices.
    Keywords: China, land reform
    JEL: Q15
    Date: 2017–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hka:wpaper:2017-091&r=res

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