nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2017‒06‒18
two papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Non-Cooperative and Cooperative Climate Policies with Anticipated Breakthrough Technology By Niko Jaakkola; Frederick van der Ploeg
  2. Should pollution taxes be targeted at income redistribution? By Bas Jacobs; Frederick van der Ploeg

  1. By: Niko Jaakkola; Frederick van der Ploeg
    Abstract: Global warming can be curbed by pricing carbon emissions and thus substituting fossil fuel with renewable energy consumption. Breakthrough technologies (e.g., fusion energy) can reduce the cost of such policies. However, the chance of such a technology coming to market depends on investment. We model breakthroughs as an irreversible tipping point in a multi-country world, with different degrees of international cooperation. We show that international spill-over effects of R&D in carbon-free technologies lead to double free-riding, strategic over-pollution and underinvestment in green R&D, thus making climate change mitigation more difficult. We also show how the demand structure determines whether carbon pricing and R&D policies are substitutes or complements.
    Keywords: global warming, carbon pricing, renewable R&D, tipping point, international cooperation, non-cooperative policies, feedback Nash equilibrium
    JEL: D2 D90 H23 Q35 Q38 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:190&r=res
  2. By: Bas Jacobs; Frederick van der Ploeg
    Abstract: This paper analyses optimal corrective taxation and optimal income redistribution. The Pigouvian pollution tax is higher if pollution damages disproportionally hurt the poor due to equity weighting of pollution damages. Moreover, optimal pollution taxes should be set below the Pigouvian tax if the poor spend a disproportionate fraction of their income on polluting goods if preferences for commodities are not of the Gorman (1961) polar form. However, optimal pollution taxes should follow the first-best rule for the Pigouvian corrective tax if preferences for commodities are of the Gorman polar form even if the government wants to redistribute income and the poor spend a disproportional part of their income on polluting goods. The often-used quasi-linear, CES and Stone-Geary utility functions all belong to the Gorman polar class. If pollution taxes are not optimized, Pareto-improving green tax reforms exist that move the pollution tax closer to the Pigouvian tax if preferences are Gorman polar. Simulations demonstrate that optimal corrective taxes should be Pigouvian if the demand for polluting goods is derived from a LES demand system, but optimal corrective taxes deviate from the Pigouvian taxes if demand for polluting goods demand is derived from a PIGLOG demand system.
    Keywords: redistributive taxation, corrective pollution taxation, Gorman polar form, Stone-Geary preferences, PIGLOG preferences, green tax reform
    JEL: H21 H23 Q54
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oxf:oxcrwp:191&r=res

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