nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2016‒02‒12
seven papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. The impacts of the EU ETS on Norwegian plants' environmental and economic performance By Marit E. Klemetsen; Knut Einar Rosendahl; Anja Lund Jakobsen
  2. Public Service Innovation: Solid Waste Sector from the Perspective of Clean Development Mechanism Landfill Projects By Silvia Cruz; Sônia Paulino; Faïz Gallouj
  3. PES, markets and property rights: a comment on Wunder's revisited concept of PES and a proposal of conceptual framework By Alain Karsenty; Driss Ezzine-De-Blas
  4. Carbon tax, pollution and spatial location of heterogeneous firms By Nelly Exbrayat; Stéphane Riou; Skerdilajda Zanaj
  5. Russia and China hydrocarbon relations A building block toward international hydrocarbon regulation? By Catherine Locatelli; Mehdi Abbas; Sylvain Rossiaud
  6. Cumulative Emissions,Unburnable Fossil Fuel and the Optimal Carbon Tax By Armon Rezai; Frederick van der Ploeg
  7. Technological change in developing countries: Trade-offs between economic, social, and environmental sustainability By Massa, Isabella

  1. By: Marit E. Klemetsen; Knut Einar Rosendahl; Anja Lund Jakobsen (Statistics Norway)
    Abstract: This paper examines the impacts of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) on the environmental and economic performance of Norwegian plants. The EU ETS is regarded as the cornerstone climate policy both in the EU and in Norway, but there has been considerable debate regarding its effects due to low quota prices and substantial allocation of free allowances to the manufacturing industry. Both quota prices and allocation rules have changed significantly between the three phases of the ETS. The rich data allow us to investigate potential effects of the ETS on several important aspects of plant behavior. The results indicate a weak tendency of emissions reductions among Norwegian plants in the second phase of the ETS, but not in the other phases. We find no significant effects on emissions intensity in any of the phases, but positive effects on value added and productivity in the second phase. Positive effects on value added and productivity may be due to the large amounts of free allowances, and that plants may have passed on the additional marginal costs to consumers.
    Keywords: Tradable emissions quotas; emissions intensity; productivity; propensity score matching; difference-in-differences
    JEL: C23 C54 D22 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2016–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ssb:dispap:833&r=res
  2. By: Silvia Cruz (UNICAMP - University of Campinas [Campinas] - University of Campinas); Sônia Paulino (University of Sao Paolo); Faïz Gallouj (Clersé - UMR CNRS 8019 - Institut de Sociologie et d'Anthropologie - Université Lille 1 - Sciences et technologies)
    Abstract: This paper is devoted to public services innovation in the municipal solid waste sector. It analyses the implementation of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in the Bandeirantes and São João landfills in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil. The study is based on the concept of Public-Private Innovation Networks in services (ServPPINs). Using the ServPPIN concept it was possible to identify competence gaps affecting the stakeholders involved in these CDM projects. We focus in particular on those organisational and relational competence gaps that are likely to weaken innovation feasibility in services related to solid waste. In fact, innovation is closely linked to the development of new competences among service providers and users. For the most part, these will arise out of changes in interactions between actors-given that the projects in question include the coordination of various actors (public, private, and citizen).
    Keywords: landfill,public service innovation,clean development mechanism,ServPPIN
    Date: 2015–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01247615&r=res
  3. By: Alain Karsenty (CIRAD - CIRAD - Besef); Driss Ezzine-De-Blas (CIRAD - CIRAD - Besef)
    Abstract: Payments for Environmental Services (PES) are often described as market-based instruments as they are used to change relative prices, and therefore to provide incentives. Following the line of thought of institutional economists, we argue that a market is a place for the transfer of property rights (the right to perform certain actions), beyond the goods and services which are exchanged. We underline the need for aclear distinction between " ecosystem services " (services obtained by peoplefromnature) and " environmental services " (services rendered by people to other people). Against Wunder's (2015) interpretation, we explain why ecosystem services are, by nature, collective or public goods, and as such do not lend themselves to appropriation.We argue also that appropriation is a precondition of exchanges, even in a service economy, unless admitting that there are markets without exchange. In PES there is no transfer of property rights: the holders simply freeze or use their ownland development rights. PES embedded into REDD+ projects, which are " backedagainst the carbon market " , and PES in which service's providres are selected through auctions: these PES can be analysed as " hybrids " combining a market-based procedure and bilateral agreements about setting environmental easements.
    Keywords: payment for environmental services,market-based instruments,markets,commodification,utilitarianism,incentives
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01262380&r=res
  4. By: Nelly Exbrayat (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Université Jean Monnet - Saint-Etienne - PRES Université de Lyon - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon); Stéphane Riou (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Université Jean Monnet - Saint-Etienne - PRES Université de Lyon - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon); Skerdilajda Zanaj (CREA - Center for Research in Economic Analysis - Uni.lu - Université du Luxembourg, CREA - Centre for Research in Economics and Management - Uni.lu - Université du Luxembourg)
    Abstract: This paper investigates the ability of a fully harmonized carbon tax to curb carbon emissions in a globalized economy characterized by an uneven spatial distribution of heterogeneous firms. The level of the carbon tax matters for the direction of the relocation and its impact on global emissions. When the carbon tax is low enough, emissions are reduced as firms relocate to the smaller country to pay lower taxes by reducing their output. If the carbon tax is too high, then firms react by relocating to the larger country to maintain their export activity, so that the most environmentally friendly spatial configurations can be removed.
    Keywords: global carbon tax, heterogeneous firms, international trade, firm location
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01256905&r=res
  5. By: Catherine Locatelli (équipe EDDEN - PACTE - Politiques publiques, ACtion politique, TErritoires - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Grenoble 2 UPMF - Université Pierre Mendès France - IEPG - Sciences Po Grenoble - Institut d'études politiques de Grenoble - UJF - Université Joseph Fourier); Mehdi Abbas (équipe EDDEN - PACTE - Politiques publiques, ACtion politique, TErritoires - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Grenoble 2 UPMF - Université Pierre Mendès France - IEPG - Sciences Po Grenoble - Institut d'études politiques de Grenoble - UJF - Université Joseph Fourier); Sylvain Rossiaud (équipe EDDEN - PACTE - Politiques publiques, ACtion politique, TErritoires - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Grenoble 2 UPMF - Université Pierre Mendès France - IEPG - Sciences Po Grenoble - Institut d'études politiques de Grenoble - UJF - Université Joseph Fourier)
    Abstract: This article is a first step of a research agenda on international hydrocarbon regulations. With regards to both: i) the new wealth and power equilibrium in the international political economy and ii) the new political economy of carbon that is emerging from The Paris agreement on Climate changes, this research agenda aims at analysing the changing national structures of governance and the ways these changes lead to international, bilateral, plurilateral or multilateral hydrocarbon regulation.
    Keywords: hydrocarbon regulation,international governance
    Date: 2015–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01246346&r=res
  6. By: Armon Rezai (Vienna University of Economics and Business, Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria); Frederick van der Ploeg (Oxford University, Manor Road Building, Oxford OX1 3UQ, U.K.)
    Abstract: A new IAM is used to calculate the optimal tradeoff between, on the one hand,locking up fossil fuel and curbing global warming, and, on the other hand, are the key driving force of changes in temperature. We highlight how time impatience, intergenerational inequality aversion and expected trend growth affect the time paths of the optimal global carbon tax and the optimal amount of fossil fuel reserves to leave untapped. We also compare these with the adverse and deleterious global warming trajectories that occur if no policy actions are taken.
    Keywords: unburnable fossil fuel, cumulative emissions, optimal carbon tax,Oxford carbon cycle, trend growth, intergenerational inequality aversion, time impatience
    Date: 2016–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wiw:wiwiee:ieep8&r=res
  7. By: Massa, Isabella (Overseas Development Institute)
    Abstract: Over the past years, the manufacturing sector has gone through a period of significant technological change. Technological innovation may bring significant socio-economic benefits and improve the environmental prospects, but it may also pose severe challenges to the economy, human well-being, and the environment. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the existing literature on the economic/social, social/environmental, and environmental/economic trade-offs stemming from technological change in the manufacturing sector, with a focus on developing countries. The policy designs proposed in the literature to minimise the trade-offs arising from technological innovation and to achieve technology-driven sustained economic growth, social inclusiveness and environmental sustainability are also examined.
    Keywords: technological change, developing countries, manufacturing, trade-offs, growth, inclusiveness, social inclusion, social exclusion, environmental sustainability
    JEL: O11 O13 O14 O15 O33 O38
    Date: 2015–12–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unm:unumer:2015051&r=res

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