nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2013‒10‒18
thirteen papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la Republica

  1. India : Diagnostic Assessment of Select Environmental Challenges, Volume 2. Economic Growth and Environmental Sustainability, What Are the Tradeoffs? By World Bank
  2. Turkey Green Growth Policy Paper : Towards a Greener Economy By World Bank
  3. The Arab Republic of Egypt : For Better or For Worse, Air Pollution in Greater Cairo By World Bank
  4. India : Diagnostic Assessment of Select Environmental Challenges, Volume 3. Valuation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in India By World Bank
  5. India : Diagnostic Assessment of Select Environmental Challenges, Volume 1. An Analysis of Physical and Monetary Losses of Environmental Health and Natural Resources By World Bank
  6. Bulgaria : Options to Improve Security of Gas Supply By World Bank
  7. Accessing International Climate Change Related Finance in Latin America and the Caribbean By World Bank
  8. On optimal emission control – Taxes, substitution and business cycles By Lintunen , Jussi; Vilmi, Lauri
  9. Indonesia : Toward Universal Access to Clean Cooking By World Bank
  10. Embodied Carbon Tariffs By Christoph Bohringer; Jared Carbone; Thomas F. Rutherford
  11. Civil servants’ education and the representativeness of the bureaucracy in environmental policy-making By Jussila Hammes, Johanna
  12. Endogenous Growth with a Ceiling on the Stock of Pollution By Kollenbach, Gilbert
  13. Air Pollution Dynamics and the Need for Temporally Differentiated Road Pricing By Coria, Jessica; Bonilla, Jorge; Grundström, Maria; Pleijel, Håkan

  1. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Environmental Economics and Policies Energy - Energy Production and Transportation Environment - Environment and Energy Efficiency
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16028&r=res
  2. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Economic Theory and Research Environmental Economics and Policies Energy - Energy Production and Transportation
    Date: 2013–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16088&r=res
  3. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Air Quality and Clean Air Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Transport Economics Policy and Planning Environmental Economics and Policies Energy - Energy Production and Transportation Transport
    Date: 2013–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16086&r=res
  4. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Environment - Ecosystems and Natural Habitats Environmental Economics and Policies Environment - Wildlife Resources Water Resources - Wetlands Environment - Climate Change and Environment
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16029&r=res
  5. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Health, Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Health Monitoring and Evaluation Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Environment - Brown Issues and Health Environmental Economics and Policies
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16027&r=res
  6. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Water Resources - Water and Industry Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Oil Refining and Gas Industry Energy - Energy Production and Transportation Industry
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16080&r=res
  7. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Science and Technology Development - Science of Climate Change Environment - Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Climate Change Economics Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Environmental Economics and Policies
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16073&r=res
  8. By: Lintunen , Jussi (Finnish Forest Research Institute); Vilmi, Lauri (Bank of Finland, Monetary Policy and Research Department)
    Abstract: This paper studies the cyclical properties of optimal emission taxes and emissions using a real business cycle model with a stock pollutant. We derive conditions for the procyclicality of optimal emission tax and show that the tax is in typical conditions procyclical. The possibility of a countercyclical behavior of the emission tax increases if 1) the pollution is short-lived and the emission transfer into environmental damages rapidly 2) emissions are countercyclical, 3) marginal damages are strongly increasing and 4), in disutility case, the marginal utility of consumption increases with the increase in the intensity of the harmful environmental process. In the climate change context we show that the optimal carbon tax is procyclical irrespectively on the production technology. Instead, the technology is a key determinant of the cyclicality of the emissions. The optimal carbon tax correlates almost fully with the consumption and as a rule-of thumb, it could be indexed to the consumption level of the economy. The relative scale of tax deviations relative to the consumption deviations is determined by the inverse of the intertemporal elasticity of substitution. Comparison between the optimal emission tax and an optimally set constant emission tax shows that the constant tax leads to very slightly higher emissions but the general economic effects are next to negligible.
    Keywords: optimal emission tax; cyclical properties
    JEL: E32 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2013–10–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:bofrdp:2013_024&r=res
  9. By: World Bank
    Keywords: Energy - Renewable Energy Energy Conservation and Efficiency Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Environmental Economics and Policies Energy - Energy Production and Transportation Environment
    Date: 2013–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wboper:16068&r=res
  10. By: Christoph Bohringer; Jared Carbone (University of Calgary); Thomas F. Rutherford
    Abstract: Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade — an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regulations. We investigate their effectiveness using simulations from an applied general equilibrium model of global trade and energy use. We find that the tariffs do reduce foreign emissions, but their ability to improve the global cost-effectiveness of climate policy is limited. Their main welfare effect is to shift the burden of developed-world climate policies to the developing world.
    Date: 2013–10–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:clg:wpaper:2013-24&r=res
  11. By: Jussila Hammes, Johanna (VTI)
    Abstract: We model and test the representativeness of environmental policy-making, as implied by cost-benefit analysis (CBA) results, in governmental agencies assuming that individual civil servants maximize their personal utility. Education may also influence civil servants’ behavior. The biologists in our sample have the highest valuation of environmental quality. We suspect that their training does not teach them about societal welfare maximization and that they consequently do not adjust their policy recommendation to CBA results, while the economists, who learn about welfare economics, do. The empirical results indicate that the economists adjust their private valuation of the environment by a factor giving a sufficient weight to the CBA results to make their average choice a cost-efficient one. Even the economists in our sample chose on average a policy that is costlier than the cost-efficient one yet clearly less expensive than the policy chosen by the biologists and social scientists.
    Keywords: Biologists; Bureaucracy; Civil servants; Education; Economists; Environmental policy; Political Economics; Representative bureaucracy; Surveys; Use of cost-benefit analysis; Weighted welfare
    JEL: H23 H83 Q25 Q53 Q58
    Date: 2013–10–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2013_030&r=res
  12. By: Kollenbach, Gilbert
    Abstract: The effects of an agreement such as the Kyoto Protocol, which implicitly imposes a ceiling on the stock of pollution, have recently been studied in Hotelling models. We add pollution and a ceiling to the endogenous growth model of \cite{tsur2005scarcity} to study the effects of the ceiling on capital accumulation and research investments. The ceiling increases the scarcity of the exhaustible resource in the short run, which boosts backstop utilization. This implies that R\&D becomes more beneficial compared with capital accumulation. How the short run development path of an economy is affected depends on its capital endowment or richness, respectively. Only economies which are neither too rich nor too poor may invest more into research. In the long run an economy with a ceiling follows basically the same long run development path as an economy without the ceiling.
    Keywords: Endogenous growth, Environmental agreements, Fossil fuels, Nonrenewable resources, Research and Development
    JEL: O44 Q32 Q54 Q55 Q56
    Date: 2013–10–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:50641&r=res
  13. By: Coria, Jessica (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University); Bonilla, Jorge (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University); Grundström, Maria (Dept of Biological and Environmental Sciences); Pleijel, Håkan (Dept of Biological and Environmental Sciences)
    Abstract: In this paper we investigate the effects of the temporal variation of pollution dispersion, traffic flows and vehicular emissions on pollution concentration and illustrate the need for temporally differentiated road pricing through an application to the case of the congestion charge in Stockholm, Sweden. By accounting explicitly for the role of pollution dispersion on optimal road pricing, we allow for a more comprehensive view of the economy-ecology interactions at stake, showing that price differentiation is an optimal response to the physical environment. Most congestion charges in place incorporate price bans to mitigate congestion. Our analysis indicates that, to ensure compliance with air quality standards, such price variations should also be a response to limited pollution dispersion.
    Keywords: air pollution; road transportation; road pricing; assimilative capacity
    JEL: L91 Q53 R48
    Date: 2013–10–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0572&r=res

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