nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2012‒06‒13
seven papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la Republica

  1. Climate-Resilient Coastal Development: Leveraging DRR and CCA to Promote Integrated Coastal Zone Management By Allan M. Lavell
  2. The Disaster Risk Management - Climate Change Adaptation Nexus By Allan M. Lavell
  3. Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Policy and Practice: The Belize Experience: Developing a National Coastal Plan for Conservation and Development Using an Integrated Management Approach By Vincent Guillet
  4. Environmental Management Responses to Punishment: Specific Deterrence and Certainty versus Severity of Punishment By Lana Friesen; Dietrich Earnhart
  5. The different approach of green advertising: an empirical analysis of the Italian context By Francesco Testa; Fabio Iraldo; Sara Tessitore; Marco Frey
  6. China's Energy Reform and Climate Policy: The Ideas Motivating Change By Olivia Boyd
  7. Post-Durban Climate Policy Architecture Based on Linkage of Cap-and-Trade Systems By Ranson, Matthew; Stavins, Robert N.

  1. By: Allan M. Lavell
    Abstract: This presentation was commissioned by the Regional Policy Dialogue and presented in the meeting Disaster Risk Reduction: Best Practices for Climate-Resilient Coastal Development held in Bridgetown, Barbados on 20 and 21 of October 2011. It discusses the synergies that could be created between the Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) tools in the Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) in the Caribbean.
    Keywords: Environment & Natural Resources :: Climate Change, Environment & Natural Resources :: Disasters
    Date: 2011–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:71458&r=res
  2. By: Allan M. Lavell
    Abstract: This presentation was commissioned by the Regional Policy Dialogue and presented in the meeting Disaster Risk Reduction: Best Practices for Climate-Resilient Coastal Development held in Bridgetown, Barbados on 20 and 21 of October 2011. It discusses the disaster nexus between risk management, climate change and its adaptation in the Caribbean.
    Keywords: Environment & Natural Resources :: Climate Change, Environment & Natural Resources :: Disasters
    Date: 2011–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:71438&r=res
  3. By: Vincent Guillet
    Abstract: This presentation was commissioned by the Regional Policy Dialogue and presented in the meeting Disaster Risk Reduction: Best Practices for Climate-Resilient Coastal Development held in Bridgetown, Barbados on 20 and 21 of October 2011. It discusses the experience of Belize with the Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change in the Coastal Zone Management (CZM).
    Keywords: Environment & Natural Resources :: Climate Change, Environment & Natural Resources :: Disasters
    Date: 2011–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idb:brikps:71478&r=res
  4. By: Lana Friesen (School of Economics, The University of Queensland); Dietrich Earnhart
    Abstract: According to the standard model of enforcement, both the certainty of punishment and the severity of punishment influence deterrence. Discerning the separate effects of these two components on behavior, however, is difficult especially because it requires constructing measures of the beliefs of individuals and regulated businesses. Our study tackles this matter using stated choice scenarios posed to environmental management professionals working at businesses operating within the Clean Water Act regulatory framework. In addition, our study examines the influence of specific deterrence, which reflects individuals’ responses to their own experiences with penalties. As important, our analysis explores the attitudes towards environmental protection held by facility management and facility environmental employees, which collectively reflect the corporate culture surrounding environmental protection efforts. We find that regulated facilities respond to increases in fine size and fine likelihood with equal sensitivity and that both specific deterrence and corporate culture are important determinants of compliance behavior.
    Date: 2012
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:qld:uq2004:463&r=res
  5. By: Francesco Testa (Istituto di Management - Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa); Fabio Iraldo (Istituto di Management - Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa); Sara Tessitore (Istituto di Management - Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa); Marco Frey (Istituto di Management - Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa)
    Abstract: Advertising is an important means of communication and can guide consumer choices by relying on their priorities. The aim of this study is to analyse the dissemination and characteristics of green advertisings in Italian newspapers between 2007 and the first half of 2008. The article aims to quantify the existence of references to environmental issues in advertisement in newspapers and magazines and to identify the prevailing elements and characteristics of the green message, such as the subject, the content and the completeness of the message or other elements such as certificates, sponsorship used to improve the effectiveness of the message. In addition, a “cluster analysis” was applied on the collected data, classifying messages into four ecological categories that are associated with a different communication strategy for the “green component” of their message.
    Keywords: environmental advertising, green marketing, green communication.
    JEL: M10
    Date: 2012–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sse:wpaper:201201&r=res
  6. By: Olivia Boyd
    Abstract: China has embarked on an ambitious and unprecedented programme of energy reform and climate change mitigation. Yet the motivations for this important shift remain unclear. This paper surveys key central government documents and articles by China's leading energy academics to investigate the ideas influencing China's new energy and climate policies. Three key ideas in particular are supportive of greater climate mitigation than in the past. First, domestic energy security concerns have risen on the central government agenda as a result of electricity shortages and rapidly rising energy consumption. Such concerns have deeply influenced China's ambitious and largely successful energy efficiency policies. Second, growing awareness of the environmental constraints on economic growth in general, and the potential damages of dangerous climate change in particular, has prompted stronger official rhetoric in favour of green development. The appearance of targets and policies that specifically target carbon emissions reductions in the 12th FYP for the first time suggests that climate change mitigation is becoming a motivation for policy action in its own right, rather than simply a co-benefit of policies enacted for other purposes. Third, a conviction that the world is moving towards low-carbon energy forms has given rise to the belief that China must become a technological and economic leader in this transition. Large levels of public financing to support the development of China's wind power and solar PV sectors suggests that the Chinese government has strong vested interests in seeing China successfully compete and lead in global low-carbon energy markets. In order to understand the shift in China's approach to climate change since the 11th FYP, it is important to understand how new ideas such as these have reframed and reshaped the Chinese government's interests and objectives.
    Keywords: China, climate change, mitigation, energy policy, environment, renewable energy, energy efficiency, carbon market, pollution, reform
    JEL: Q54 Q48 Q58 P28
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:een:ccepwp:1205&r=res
  7. By: Ranson, Matthew (Harvard University); Stavins, Robert N. (Harvard University)
    Abstract: The outcome of the December 2011 United Nations climate negotiations in Durban, South Africa, provides an important new opportunity to move toward an international climate policy architecture that is capable of delivering broad international participation and significant global CO2 emissions reductions at reasonable cost. We evaluate one important component of potential climate policy architecture for the post-Durban era: links among independent tradable permit systems for greenhouse gases. Because linkage reduces the cost of achieving given targets, there is tremendous pressure to link existing and planned cap-and-trade systems, and in fact, a number of links already or will soon exist. We draw on recent political and economic experience with linkage to evaluate potential roles that linkage may play in post-Durban international climate policy, both in a near-term, de facto architecture of indirect links between regional, national, and sub-national cap-and-trade systems, and in longer-term, more comprehensive bottom-up architecture of direct links. Although linkage will certainly help to reduce long-term abatement costs, it may also serve as an effective mechanism for building institutional and political structure to support a future climate agreement.
    JEL: Q40 Q48 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2012–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp12-025&r=res

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