nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2011‒11‒14
three papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la Republica

  1. The impact of climate change on hurricane damages in the United States By Mendelsohn, Robert; Emanuel, Kerry; Chonabayashi, Shun
  2. The impact of climate change on global tropical storm damages By Mendelsohn, Robert; Emanuel, Kerry; Chonabayashi, Shun
  3. From growth to green growth -- a framework By Hallegatte, Stephane; Heal, Geoffrey; Fay, Marianne; Treguer, David

  1. By: Mendelsohn, Robert; Emanuel, Kerry; Chonabayashi, Shun
    Abstract: This paper quantifies hurricane damage caused by climate change across the US. A damage function is estimated from historic hurricane data to measure the impacts at each location given the storm's strength. The minimum barometric pressure of each storm turns out to be a better indicator of damages than the traditional measure of maximum wind speed. A hurricane generator in the Atlantic Ocean is then used to create 5000 storms with and without climate change. Combining the location and intensity of each storm with the income and population projected for each location, it is possible to estimate a detailed picture of how hurricanes will impact each state with and without climate change. Income and population growth alone increase expected baseline damage from $9 to $27 billion per year by 2100. Climate change is expected to increase damage by another $40 billion. Over 85 percent of these impacts are in Florida and the Gulf states. The 10 percent most damaging storms cause 93 percent of expected damage.
    Keywords: Climate Change Economics,Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases,Hazard Risk Management,Science of Climate Change,Global Environment Facility
    Date: 2011–02–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5561&r=res
  2. By: Mendelsohn, Robert; Emanuel, Kerry; Chonabayashi, Shun
    Abstract: This paper constructs an integrated assessment model of tropical cyclones in order to quantify the impact that climate change may have on tropical cyclone damages in countries around the world. The paper relies on a tropical cyclone generator in each ocean and several climate models to predict tropical cyclones with and without climate change. A damage model is constructed to compute the resulting damage when a cyclone strikes each country. Economic development is expected to double global tropical cyclone damages because more will be in harm's way. Climate change is expected to double global damage again, causing an additional $54 billion of damage per year. The damage is projected to be concentrated in North America and eastern Asia but many Caribbean islands will suffer the highest damages per unit of GDP. Most of the increased damage will be caused by rare but very powerful storms.
    Keywords: Climate Change Economics,Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases,Hazard Risk Management,Science of Climate Change,Global Environment Facility
    Date: 2011–02–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5562&r=res
  3. By: Hallegatte, Stephane; Heal, Geoffrey; Fay, Marianne; Treguer, David
    Abstract: Green growth is about making growth processes resource-efficient, cleaner and more resilient without necessarily slowing them. This paper aims at clarifying these concepts in an analytical framework and at proposing foundations for green growth. The green growth approach proposed here is based on (1) focusing on what needs to happen over the next 5-10 years before the world gets locked into patterns that would be prohibitively expensive and complex to modify and (2) reconciling the short and the long term, by offsetting short-term costs and maximizing synergies and economic co-benefits. This, in turn, increases the social and political acceptability of environmental policies. This framework identifies channels through which green policies can potentially contribute to economic growth. However, only detailed country- and context-specific analyses for each of these channels could reach firm conclusion regarding their actual impact on growth. Finally, the paper discusses the policies that can be implemented to capture these co-benefits and environmental benefits. Since green growth policies pursue a variety of goals, they are best served by a combination of instruments: price-based policies are important but are only one component in a policy tool-box that can also include norms and regulation, public production and direct investment, information creation and dissemination, education and moral suasion, or industrial and innovation policies.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics&Policies,Climate Change Economics,Economic Theory&Research,Transport Economics Policy&Planning,Energy Production and Transportation
    Date: 2011–11–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5872&r=res

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