nep-res New Economics Papers
on Resource Economics
Issue of 2006‒05‒20
two papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la Republica

  1. Can Coasean bargaining justify Pigouvian taxation? By Stephanie Rosenkranz; Patrick W. Schmitz
  2. Analysis of Environmental Costs of Mobility due to Urban Sprawl - A Modelling Study on Italian Cities By Chiara M. Travisi; Roberto Camagni; Peter Nijkamp

  1. By: Stephanie Rosenkranz; Patrick W. Schmitz
    Abstract: The fact that according to the celebrated Coase Theorem rational parties always try to exploit all gains from trade is usually taken as an argument against the necessity of government intervention through Pigouvian taxation in order to correct externalities. However, we show that the hold-up problem, which occurs if non-verifiable investments have external effects and parties cannot be prevented from always exploiting ex post gains from trade through Coasean bargaining, may be solved by government intervention. In this sense, the impossibility to rule out Coasean bargaining (after investments are sunk) may in fact justify Pigouvian taxation.
    Keywords: Hold-up problem, Bargaining, Contracts, Taxation, Externalities
    JEL: D62 H21 H23 L14
    Date: 2006–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bon:bonedp:bgse7_2006&r=res
  2. By: Chiara M. Travisi (DIG, Politecnico di Milano, and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei); Roberto Camagni (DIG, Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy); Peter Nijkamp (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
    Abstract: A sound empirical and quantitative analysis on the relationship between different patterns of urban expansion and the environmental or social costs of mobility is rare, and the few studies available provide at best a qualitative discussion of these issues. Some recent tentative studies on the metropolitan area of Milan have empirically explored whether different patterns of urban expansion generate different levels of land use and heterogeneous impacts of urban mobility. The results confirmed the expectation that a higher environmental impact of mobility may result from more extensive and sprawling urban development, from recent urbanisation processes and from residential specialisation. The present paper extends the previous empirical analysis to seven major Italian metropolitan areas (namely, Bari, Florence, Naples, Padua, Perugia, Potenza and Turin) in order to corroborate the previous tentative results for the Italian context. The novelty of the prese! nt paper is threefold. First, we are interested in exploring the changes that have occurred due to the increased intensity of mobility across a ten-year period, from 1981 to 1991, which corresponds to the Italian economic boom years. Secondly, using an econometric analysis of cross-section data, we consider several metropolitan areas simultaneously, and are therefore able to explore whether there are significant differences in the way the model explains variations in the mobility impact across various Italian urban areas. And finally, we offer a structural interpretation of the causal chain in the explanation of the mobility impact intensity by using Causal Path Analysis as a statistical test framework.
    Keywords: urban mobility; sprawl; environmental costs; self-containment capacity; causal path analysis
    JEL: Q56 R14 R41
    Date: 2006–05–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:dgr:uvatin:20060042&r=res

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