nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2022‒05‒23
two papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Men Are from Mars, and Women Too: A Bayesian Meta-Analysis of Overconfidence Experiments By Oriana Bandiera; Nidhi Parekh; Barbara Petrongolo; Michelle Rao
  2. When Parents Decide: Gender Differences in Competitiveness By Jonas Tungodden; Alexander Willén; Alexander L.P. Willén

  1. By: Oriana Bandiera; Nidhi Parekh; Barbara Petrongolo; Michelle Rao
    Abstract: Gender differences in self-confidence could explain women’s under representation in high-income occupations and glass-ceiling effects. We draw lessons from the economic literature via a survey of experts and a Bayesian hierarchical model that aggregates experimental findings over the last twenty years. The experts’ survey indicates beliefs that men are overconfident and women under-confident. Yet, the literature reveals that both men and women are typically overconfident. Moreover, the model cannot reject the hypothesis that gender differences in self-confidence are equal to zero. In addition, the estimated pooling factor is low, implying that each study contains little information over a common phenomenon. The discordance can be reconciled if the experts overestimate the pooling factor or have priors that are biased and precise.
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_9515&r=
  2. By: Jonas Tungodden; Alexander Willén; Alexander L.P. Willén
    Abstract: Parents make important choices for their children in many areas of life, yet the empirical literature on this topic is scarce. We study parents’ competitiveness choices for their children by combining two large-scale artefactual field experiments with high-quality longitudinal administrative data. We document three main sets of findings. First, parents choose more competition for their sons than daughters. Second, this gender difference can largely be explained by parents’ beliefs about their children’s competitiveness preferences. Third, parents’ choices predict children's later-in-life educational outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide novel evidence on the role of parents in shaping children’s long-term outcomes.
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_9516&r=

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