nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2020‒03‒16
two papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Children's socio-emotional skills: Is there a quantity-quality trade-off? By Simon Briole; Hélène Le Forner; Anthony Lepinteur
  2. Intelligence, Errors and Strategic Choices in the Repeated Prisoners' Dilemma By Proto, Eugenio; Rustichini, Aldo; Sofianos, Andis

  1. By: Simon Briole ((Paris School of Economics); Hélène Le Forner (Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, EHESS, Ecole Centrale, AMSE, Marseille, France); Anthony Lepinteur (University of Luxembourg)
    Abstract: Although it is widely acknowledged that non-cognitive skills matter for adult outcomes, little is known about the role played by family environment in the formation of these skills. We use a longitudinal survey of children born in the UK in 2000-2001, the Millennium Cohort Study by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies, to estimate the effect of family size on socio-emotional skills, measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. To account for the endogeneity of fertility decisions, we use a well-known instrumental approach that exploits parents' preference for children's gender diversity. We show that the birth of a third child negatively affects the socio-emotional skills of the first two children in a persistent manner. However, we show that this negative effect is entirely driven by girls. We provide evidence that this gender effect is partly driven by an unequal response of parents' time investment in favour of boys and, to a lesser extent, by an unequal demand for household chores.
    Keywords: non-cognitive skills; family size; birth order; child development
    JEL: I20 J13 J16
    Date: 2020–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:aim:wpaimx:2006&r=all
  2. By: Proto, Eugenio (University of Glasgow); Rustichini, Aldo (University of Minnesota); Sofianos, Andis (Heidelberg University)
    Abstract: A large literature in behavioral economics has emphasized in the last decades the role of individual differences in social preferences (such as trust and altruism) and in influencing behavior in strategic environments. Here we emphasize the role of attention and working memory, and show that social interactions among heterogeneous groups are likely to be mediated by differences in cognitive skills. Our design uses a Repeated Prisoner's Dilemma, and we compare rates of cooperation in groups of subjects grouped according to their IQ, with those in combined groups. While in combined groups we observe higher cooperation rates and profits than in separated groups (with consistent gains among lower IQ subjects and relatively smaller losses for higher IQ subjects), higher IQ subjects become less lenient when they are matched with lower IQ subjects than when they play separately. We argue that this is an instance of a general phenomenon, which we demonstrate in an evolutionary game theory model, where higher IQ among subjects determines – through better working memory – a lower frequency of errors in strategy implementation. In our data, we show that players indeed choose less lenient strategies in environments where subjects have higher error rates. The estimations of errors and strategies from the experimental data are consistent with the hypothesis and the predictions of the model.
    Keywords: IQ, intelligence, cooperation, repeated Prisoner's Dilemma, strategy, error in transition
    JEL: C73 C91 C92
    Date: 2020–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12925&r=all

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