nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2015‒07‒04
three papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Cognitive, Non-Cognitive Skills and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data in Bangladesh By Nordman, Christophe Jalil; Sarr, Leopold; Sharma, Smriti
  2. IMMEDIATE EFFECT OF MIND SOUND RESONANCE TECHNIQUE (MSRT- A YOGIC RELAXATION TECHNIQUE) ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN TYPE 2 DIABETES By Subarna Mohanty; Kashinath Metri; Nagaratna R. and H. R. Nagendra
  3. Conscious nano-robotic control of molecular processes underlying attention and memory By L. Ingber

  1. By: Nordman, Christophe Jalil (IRD, DIAL, Paris-Dauphine); Sarr, Leopold (World Bank); Sharma, Smriti (UNU-WIDER)
    Abstract: We use a first-hand linked employer-employee dataset representing the formal sector of Bangladesh to explain gender wage gaps by the inclusion of measures of cognitive skills and personality traits. Our results show that while cognitive skills are important in determining mean wages, personality traits have little explanatory power. However, quantile regressions indicate that personality traits do matter in certain parts of the conditional wage distribution, especially for wages of females. Cognitive skills as measured by reading and numeracy also confer different benefits across the wage distribution to females and males respectively. Quantile decompositions indicate that these skills and traits reduce the unexplained gender gap, mainly in the upper parts of the wage distribution. Finally, results suggest that employers place greater consideration on observables such as academic background and prior work experience, and may also make assumptions about the existence of sex-specific skills of their workers, which could then widen the within-firm gender wage gap.
    Keywords: gender wage gap, cognitive skills, personality traits, matched worker-firm data, quantile decompositions, Bangladesh
    JEL: J16 J24 J31 J71 C21 O12
    Date: 2015–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9132&r=neu
  2. By: Subarna Mohanty; Kashinath Metri; Nagaratna R. and H. R. Nagendra
    Abstract: Diabetes is one of the chronic medical condition with high prevalence rates. Long standing diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive functioning. Yoga is known to improve the cognitive functions in normal and chronic diseased individuals. Mind sound resonance technique (MSRT) is one of the mindfulness based yogic relaxation technique, know to enhance cognitive functions. The objective comprised to study the immediate effect of MSRT practice on cognitive function in patient with type 2 diabetes.Forty three (18 male) type 2 diabetes patientswith an age range between 30 to 65 (mean age ± SD = 56.83 ± 12.54) with minimum history of diabetes since last 5 years, were enrolled in this study. All the subjects underwent training of 15 sessions of MSRT practice in 6 days. 7th day subjects were administered DLST before and immediately after the MSRT intervention. Data was found normally distributed by Shapiro-Wilcox test. The paired sample t test was used to see the pre-post changes.There was significant improvement in total score (p = 0.001; +24.99) and net score (p = 0.001; +25.47) along with a nonsignificant decrease in wrong attempts (p- 0.855) of DLST.Present pilot study indicates that MSRT may have a potential role in enhancing psychomotor performance in patients suffering from diabetes, immediately after the practice. These findings need confirmation from studies with a larger sample size and randomized controlled design, which will be implicated in the future. Key words: Mind sound resonance technique; psychomotor performance; diabetes, mindfulness, cognitive function
    Date: 2015–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:vor:issues:2015-06-11&r=neu
  3. By: L. Ingber
    Date: 2015
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:lei:ingber:15cr&r=neu

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