nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2014‒08‒28
three papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation By Francesca Cornaglia; Warn N. Lekfuangfu; Nattavudh Powdthavee; Nele Warrinnier
  2. Altruism and Self Control By Anna Dreber; Drew Fudenberg; David K Levine; David G Rand
  3. Psychological Skills, Education, and Longevity of High-Ability Individuals By Peter A. Savelyev

  1. By: Francesca Cornaglia; Warn N. Lekfuangfu; Nattavudh Powdthavee; Nele Warrinnier
    Abstract: We propose a model in which parents have a subjective belief about the impact of their investment on the early skill formation of their children. This subjective belief is determined in part by locus of control (LOC), i.e., the extent to which individuals believe that their actions can influence future outcomes. Using a unique British cohort survey, we show that maternal LOC measured during the 1st-trimester strongly predicts early and late child cognitive and noncognitive outcomes. Further, we utilize the variation in maternal LOC to improve the specification typically used in the estimation of parental investment effects on child development.
    Keywords: Locus of control, parental investment, human capital accumulation, early skill formation, ALSPAC
    JEL: J01 I31
    Date: 2014–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1293&r=neu
  2. By: Anna Dreber; Drew Fudenberg; David K Levine; David G Rand
    Date: 2014–08–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cla:levarc:786969000000000962&r=neu
  3. By: Peter A. Savelyev (Vanderbilt University, Department of Economics)
    Abstract: Based on the 1922–1991 Terman data of children with high ability, I investigate the effects of childhood psychological skills and post-compulsory education on longevity. I identify causal effects and account for measurement error using factor-analytic methodology (Heckman et al., 2006). Latent class analysis supports the causal interpretation of results. For males, I find strong effects of psychological skills and education on longevity and an interaction between personality and education. Results are in line with the IV literature. For females, who are born around 1910 and live longer than men, I find no effects of education and personality on longevity.
    Keywords: longevity, survival function, life expectancy, value of longevity, post-compulsory education, IQ, personality skills, Big Five, average treatment effect, Terman Data of Children with High Ability, gender difference
    JEL: I1 C1
    Date: 2014–08–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:van:wpaper:vuecon-sub-14-00007&r=neu

This nep-neu issue is ©2014 by Daniel Houser. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.