nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2014‒03‒15
three papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Digit Ratio Measurement Guide By Neyse, Levent; Brañas-Garza, Pablo
  2. DO AS I DO, NOT AS I SAY: INCENTIVIZATION AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COGNITIVE ABILITY AND RISKAVERSION By SÉRGIO ALMEIDA DE SOUSA; MARCOS DE ALMEIDA RANGEL
  3. Are Smarter People Better Samaritans? Effect of Cognitive Abilities on Pro-Social Behaviors By Luis Aranda; Martin Daniel Siyaranamual

  1. By: Neyse, Levent; Brañas-Garza, Pablo
    Abstract: Literature on Digit Ratio is rapidly growing in Economics. Quite surprisingly we observe that there is no consensus about how to make an accurate measurement in such a delicate task. Along this brief document we offer some concise guidance of how to scan the hands using digital scanners and provide a comprehensive guideline to make a reliable measurement of the 2D:4D. Furthermore, we point out the most common imaging and measurement errors. We also provide a number of hints aimed to avoid these errors that in some cases may cause systematic inaccuracies.
    Keywords: 2D:4D; Digit ratio; Measurement; Guide
    JEL: C42 C8 C90
    Date: 2014–03–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:54134&r=neu
  2. By: SÉRGIO ALMEIDA DE SOUSA; MARCOS DE ALMEIDA RANGEL
    Date: 2014
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:anp:en2012:126&r=neu
  3. By: Luis Aranda (Advanced School of Economics, University Ca' Foscari of Venice); Martin Daniel Siyaranamual (Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University)
    Abstract: This study investigates how cognitive abilities correlate with civic engagement of older Europeans (aged 50+), using waves two and three of the SHARE dataset. An instrumental variable approach is employed in an at-tempt to disentangle possible endogeneity issues arising between cognitive abilities and civic engagement. Cognitive abilities are instrumented with the number of books in the respondent's place of residence during childhood. The results advocate for the existence of a causal relationship running from cognition in old age to community engagement. Though contradicting standard theoretical predictions, this empirical finding is in line with mainline experimental results showing how participants with higher cognitive abilities tend to be less risk averse, and thus more willing to opt for a payoff-dominant action in a stag hunt game context more often.
    Keywords: Cognitive ability; civic engagement; instrumental variables;risk-aversion; we-rationality
    JEL: D03 D64 D71
    Date: 2014–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unp:wpaper:201405&r=neu

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