nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2013‒06‒24
four papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Incorporating Eye Tracking Technology and Conjoint Analysis to Better Understand the Green Industry Consumer By Campbell, Benjamin L.; Behe, Bridget K.; Khachatryan, Hayk; Hall, Charles R.; Dennis, Jennifer H.; Huddleston, Patricia T.; Fernandez, R. Thomas
  2. Does Eye Tracking Reveal More About the Effects of Buying Impulsiveness on the Green Industry Consumer Choice Behavior By Khachatryan, Hayk; Behe, Bridget K.; Campbell, Benjamin; Hall, Charles; Dennis, Jennifer
  3. Consumer Response to Egg Production Systems and the Effect of Proposition 2 Advertising: A Preliminary Neuroeconomic Analysis By McFadden, Brandon R.; Lusk, Jayson L.; Crespi, John M.; Cherry, J. Bradley C.; Martin, Laura E.; Bruce, Amanda S.
  4. How much of the error term is explained by psychometric variables? The example of organic produce demand By Grebitus, Carola; Dumortier, Jerome

  1. By: Campbell, Benjamin L.; Behe, Bridget K.; Khachatryan, Hayk; Hall, Charles R.; Dennis, Jennifer H.; Huddleston, Patricia T.; Fernandez, R. Thomas
    Abstract: Plants are often merchandised with minimal packaging, thus, consumers have only the plant itself (intrinsic cue) or information signs (extrinsic cues) on which to assess product and on which to base their purchase decision. Our objective was to explore consumers’ preference for select plant display attributes and compare how consumers visually looked at the attributes. Using conjoint analysis we identified three distinct consumer segments: plant oriented (73%), production method oriented (11%), and price oriented (16%) consumers. Utilizing eye tracking technology we show that subjects spent more visual attention on cues in the retail displays that were relatively more important to them. For instance, plant oriented consumers were the fastest to fixate on the plants and looked at the plants for longer amounts of time compared to the other segments. Production method oriented consumers looked at the production labeling for a longer duration, while the price oriented consumer looked at the price sign the longest. Findings suggest that retailers should carefully consider the type of information included on signs and the relative importance those terms may have to a variety of consumers.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Productivity Analysis, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea13:150431&r=neu
  2. By: Khachatryan, Hayk; Behe, Bridget K.; Campbell, Benjamin; Hall, Charles; Dennis, Jennifer
    Abstract: Although consumer behavior research has investigated impulsive buying behavior since the early 1950s, no studies explored the relationship between eye gaze metrics, buying impulsiveness scores and purchase decisions. The present study is a preliminary approach to setting consumer purchase decisions as a function of not only product attributes, but also individuals’ buying impulsiveness and eye gaze measures, which were collected using an eye tracking device during choice experiments. Specifically, we investigated the moderation effects of eye gaze measures on the relationship between buying impulsiveness and plants (woody ornamental shrubs, perennials, vegetable, herbs, annuals, etc.) purchase decisions. The results showed that impulsive buying scores were negatively related to purchase decisions, and that eye gaze fixation duration (when viewing plant displays) magnified or mitigated that relationship, depending on the type of the display information viewed. Marketing implications for developing effective plant sales efforts are discussed.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea13:150333&r=neu
  3. By: McFadden, Brandon R.; Lusk, Jayson L.; Crespi, John M.; Cherry, J. Bradley C.; Martin, Laura E.; Bruce, Amanda S.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Production Economics,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea13:150437&r=neu
  4. By: Grebitus, Carola; Dumortier, Jerome
    Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of human values and personality on the demand for organic tomatoes applying open-ended choice experiments to data from an online study that was performed in summer 2012. Results show that consumers make a distinction between conventional and organic produce, such that human values have a differential impact with regard to predicting demand for products associated with organic labels. Also, consumers distinguish between conventional and organic produce, such that personality has a differential impact with regard to predicting demand for products associated with organic labels. However, results are not as strong as for human values. Overall, results indicate that human values and personality are able to explain a portion of the variability of demand for organic tomatoes.
    Keywords: demand, human values, open ended choice experiments, organic, personality, tobit model, Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, M31, Q13,
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea13:150193&r=neu

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