nep-neu New Economics Papers
on Neuroeconomics
Issue of 2013‒01‒26
three papers chosen by
Daniel Houser
George Mason University

  1. Quasi-hyperbolic time preferences and their intergenerational transmission By Kosse, Fabian; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm
  2. The Evolution of Altruistic Preferences: Mothers versus Fathers By Alger, Ingela; Cox, Donald
  3. The Type to Train? - Impacts of Personality Characteristics on Further Training Participation By Judith Offerhaus

  1. By: Kosse, Fabian; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm
    Abstract: This study explores the intergenerational transmission of time preferences and focuses on the question which specific aspects of mother's time preference are related to her preschool child's ability to delay gratification. We provide a new procedure for assessing the parameters of a 'quasi-hyperbolic' discount function (Laibson, 1997) using two trade-off experiments. We apply the procedure to a sample of 213 mother-child pairs and show that especially mother's beta parameter is related to her preschool child's ability to delay gratification. --
    Keywords: Intergenerational Transmission,Time Preference,Quasi-Hyperbolic Discounting,Preschool Children
    JEL: D90 D10
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:zewdip:13002&r=neu
  2. By: Alger, Ingela (TSE (LERNA, CNRS) Univesité Toulouse 1 Capitole); Cox, Donald (Boston College)
    Abstract: What can evolutionary biology tell us about male-female differences in preferences concerning family matters? Might mothers be more solicitous toward offspring than fathers, for example? The economics literature has documented gender differences—children benefit more from money put in the hands of mothers rather than fathers, for example—and these differences are thought to be partly due to preferences. Yet for good reason family economics is mostly concerned with how prices and incomes affect behavior against a backdrop of exogenous preferences. Evolutionary biology complements this approach by treating preferences as the outcome of natural selection. We mine the well-developed biological literature to make a prima facie case for evolutionary roots of parental preferences. We consider the most rudimentary of traits—sex differences in gamete size and internal fertilization—and explain how they have been thought to generate malefemale differences in altruism toward children and other preferences related to family behavior. The evolutionary approach to the family illuminates connections between issues typically thought distinct in family economics, such as parental care and marriage markets.
    Date: 2012–12–31
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tse:iastwp:26675&r=neu
  3. By: Judith Offerhaus
    Abstract: Personality traits drive behaviors and attitudes, and determine socio-economic life outcomes for individuals. This paper investigates the relationship of six personality traits, the Big Five and Locus of Control, to individual participation in employment-related further education and training (FET) in a longitudinal perspective. Initial research suggests that training is a crucial determinant of life chances. Taking this a step further, I ask what sorts of individual personality traits characterize the type to train. I attempt to answer this question using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel from the time period 2000-2008. Applying random-effects logistic regression models to 39,833 observations of 4,981 individuals over a period of nine years reveals that those who are open to new experiences and have high internal control beliefs are more likely to participate in FET, and this holds true for different model specifications. Contrary to the hypotheses, Agreeableness, Extraversion and Neuroticism do not impact FET, whereas the training effect of Conscientiousness is more complex. It shows that in addition to the classical determinants of FET such as education and occupational status, there are personality traits which characterize the type to train. Practical implications of this finding are discussed.
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp531&r=neu

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