nep-mfd New Economics Papers
on Microfinance
Issue of 2019‒06‒17
two papers chosen by
Olivier Dagnelie
Université de Caen

  1. Ireland’s Peculiar Microfinance Revolution, c. 1836-1845 By Eoin McLaughlin; Rowena Pecchenino
  2. Recent finance advances in information technology for inclusive development: a systematic review By Simplice A. Asongu; Jacinta C. Nwachukwu

  1. By: Eoin McLaughlin (Cork University Business School, University College Cork); Rowena Pecchenino (Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
    Abstract: In the decade before the famine, Ireland experienced a boom in Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). This paper analyses the motivations of MFI proponents and practitioners, and finds evidence linking the boom in MFIs with the introduction of the poor law in 1838. Many contemporary writers saw microfinance as a complex tax avoidance/reduction scheme that could lessen the burden on rate payers by helping the poor help themselves. The link between MFIs and the poor law is confirmed by an econometric analysis of MFIs at the level of the poor law union.
    Keywords: microfinance, inequality, development, Ireland
    JEL: G21 H75 I38 N23 N33 N83
    Date: 2019–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sss:wpaper:2019-02&r=all
  2. By: Simplice A. Asongu (Yaoundé/Cameroon); Jacinta C. Nwachukwu (Preston, United Kingdom)
    Abstract: The overarching question tackled in this paper is: to what degree has financial development contributed to providing opportunities of human development for those on low-incomes and by what information technology mechanisms? We systematically review about 180 recently published papers to provide recent information technology advances in finance for inclusive development. Retained financial innovations are structured along three themes. They are: (i) the rural-urban divide, (ii) women empowerment and (iii) human capital in terms of skills and training. The financial instruments are articulated with case studies, innovations and investment strategies with particular emphasis, inter alia on: informal finance, microfinance, mobile banking, crowdfunding, microinsurance, Islamic finance, remittances, Payment for Environmental Services (PES) and the Diaspora Investment in Agriculture (DIA) initiative.
    Keywords: Finance; Inclusive Growth; Economic Development
    JEL: G20 I10 I20 I30 O10
    Date: 2018–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:abh:wpaper:18/040&r=all

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