nep-mfd New Economics Papers
on Microfinance
Issue of 2015‒04‒11
three papers chosen by
Olivier Dagnelie
Université de Namur

  1. The Impact of Financial Education for Youth in Ghana By Berry, James; Karlan, Dean S.; Pradhan, Menno
  2. The Empirical Determinants of Cassava Farmers Access to Microfinance Services in Abia State Nigeria By Obike, Kingsley Chukwuemeka; Osundu, Charles Kelechi
  3. Comparative Determinants of Productivity among Cassava Farmer-Beneficiaries and Non-Beneficiaries of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) in Abia State Nigeria By Obike, Kingsley Chukwuemeka; Osundu, Charles Kelechi

  1. By: Berry, James; Karlan, Dean S.; Pradhan, Menno
    Abstract: We evaluate, using a randomized trial, two school-based financial literacy education programs in government-run primary and junior high schools in Ghana. One program integrated financial and social education, whereas the second program only offered financial education. Both programs included a voluntary after-school savings club that provided students with a locked money box. After nine months, both programs had significant impacts on savings behavior relative to the control group, mostly because children moved savings from home to school. We observed few other impacts. We do find that financial education, when not accompanied by social education, led children to work more compared to the control group, whereas no such effect is found for the integrated curriculum; however, the difference between the two treatment effects on child labor is not statistically significant.
    Keywords: financial literacy; savings; youth finance
    JEL: D14 J22 J24 O12
    Date: 2015–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10529&r=mfd
  2. By: Obike, Kingsley Chukwuemeka; Osundu, Charles Kelechi
    Abstract: ABSTRACT The study analyzed the determinants of cassava farmers’ accessibility to microfinance services in Abia state, Nigeria. Specifically the study assessed the economic variables influencing cassava farmers’ accessibility to microfinance, the qualitative perception of farmers’ access and the empirical determinants of cassava farmers’ accessibility to microfinance. Multistage random sampling technique was used in selecting respondents who were beneficiaries of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) spread across the 3 agricultural zones in the state; from which primary data were collected using questionnaires. A total of 120 cassava farmers who are beneficiaries of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) were used in the study. Method of data analysis used were means, frequencies, percentages, likert scale analysis and the logit multiple regression model. The result revealed that gender, age, education, household size, farm size and farming experience are the socio-economic variables influencing cassava farmers’ access to MFIs. The varied level of accessibility enjoyed by cassava farmers were in terms of total amount of credit received, amount of credit used for cassava farming and distance to MFIs location. While the important significant determinants of accessibility are gender, age, education, farming experience, amount of loan repaid and ownership of house. It is therefore recommended that government policies can capitalize on the socio-economic variables in this study as veritable tools to encouraging accessibility to MFIs.
    Keywords: KEYWORDS: Accessibility; Microfinance Institutions (MFIs); Cassava farmers; services
    JEL: Q14
    Date: 2013–06–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:63326&r=mfd
  3. By: Obike, Kingsley Chukwuemeka; Osundu, Charles Kelechi
    Abstract: ABSTRACT This study investigated the comparative determinants of productivity among cassava farmer-beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of Microfinance Institution (MFIs) in Abia state, Nigeria. Specifically, the study identified and examined factors influencing productivity of cassava farmers who are beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of Microfinance Institutions (MFIs). Multistage random sampling technique was implored in sorting out respondents who are beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of MFIs spread across the 3 agricultural zones in the state. This provided the sample frame from which primary data were collected with the use of a pre tested and structured questionnaire. A total of 240 cassava farmers who are both beneficiaries (120) and non-beneficiaries (120) of MFIs were used in this study. The method of data analysis used is the ordinary least square (OLS) regression technique with the choice of Cobb Douglas as the lead equation most suited to explain productivity analysis and chow test for test of difference between means of factors. The result revealed that gender, age, household size and farming experience were directly related to productivity at varied 1.0%, 5.0% and 10.0% levels of significance for beneficiaries of MFIs while non-beneficiaries coefficient for gender, age, education, farm size, household size and farming experience were statistically significant at varied critical probability levels. The chow test however reveals that the calculated F-value given as 5.784 is significant at 1.0% levels, hence proved that MFIs beneficiaries are more productive than non-beneficiaries. It is therefore necessary for government policies to consider encouraging male cassava farmers, with good farming experience and moderate household members to ensure and maintain productivity.
    Keywords: Comparative Determinants; Productivity; Beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries; Microfinance Institution (MFIs); Cassava
    JEL: Q14 Q18
    Date: 2013–06–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:63325&r=mfd

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