nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2022‒08‒15
three papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Caring for Carers? The Effect of Public Subsidies on the Wellbeing of Unpaid Carers By Costa-Font, Joan; D’Amico, Francesco; Vilaplana-Prieto, Cristina
  2. Second-generation immigrants and native attitudes toward immigrants in Europe By Oscar Barrera; Isabelle Bensidoun; Anthony Edo
  3. Testing the Hayek hypothesis: Recent theoretical and experimental evidence By Brian Albrecht; Omar Al-Ubaydli; Peter Boettke

  1. By: Costa-Font, Joan (London School of Economics); D’Amico, Francesco (CEP, London School of Economics); Vilaplana-Prieto, Cristina (Universidad de Murcia)
    Abstract: We study the effect of long-term care (LTC) subsidies and supports on the wellbeing of unpaid caregivers. We draw on evidence from a policy intervention, that universalized previously means-tested caregiving supports in Scotland, known as free personal care (FPC). We document causal evidence of an increase in the well-being (happiness) of unpaid carers after the introduction of FPC. Our estimates suggest economically relevant improvements in the happiness (12pp increase in subjective wellbeing) among caregivers exposed to FPC and that provide at least 35 hours of care per week. Consistently, these results are larger among women and non-actively employed caregivers (17pp increase in happiness). Estimates are not driven by selection into caregiving (we find similar wellbeing effects among caregivers at baseline and caregivers throughout the sample), and are driven by income effects of FPC among caregivers.
    Keywords: caregiver's wellbeing, subjective wellbeing, long-term care subsidies, caregiving, Scotland
    JEL: J22
    Date: 2022–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp15369&r=
  2. By: Oscar Barrera; Isabelle Bensidoun; Anthony Edo
    Abstract: This paper investigates the role played by immigrants and their children in shaping native attitudes toward immigrants in the European Union. By exploiting the 2017 Special Eurobarometer on immigrant integration, we show that countries with a relatively high share of immigrants are more likely to believe that immigrants are a burden on the welfare system and worsen crime. In contrast, native opinions on the impact of immigration on culture and the labor market are unrelated to the presence of immigrants. We also find that the effects of second-generation immigrants on pro-immigrant attitudes toward security and fiscal concerns are positive (as opposed to first-generation immigrants). Finally, we find no impact of the immigrant share on the attitudes of natives supporting far-left or left political parties, while it is the most negative among respondents affiliated with far-right parties.
    Keywords: Immigration;Second-generation Immigrants;Attitudes toward Immigrants;Public Opinion
    JEL: J15 F22 P16
    Date: 2022–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cii:cepidt:2022-03&r=
  3. By: Brian Albrecht; Omar Al-Ubaydli; Peter Boettke
    Abstract: Economists well understand that the work of Friedrich Hayek contains important theoretical insights. It is less often acknowledged that his work contains testable predictions about the nature of market processes. Vernon Smith termed the most important one the 'Hayek hypothesis': that gains from trade can be realized in the presence of diffuse, decentralized information, and in the absence of price-taking behavior and centralized market direction. Vernon Smith tested this prediction by surveying data on laboratory experimental markets and found strong support. We extend Smith's work first by showing how subsequent theoretical advances provide a theoretical foundation for the Hayek Hypothesis. We then test the hypothesis using recent field experimental market data. Using field experiments allows us to test several other predictions from Hayek, such as that market experience increases the realized gains from trade. Generally speaking, we find support for Hayek's theories.
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:feb:artefa:00759&r=

This nep-ltv issue is ©2022 by Maximo Rossi. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.