nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2022‒04‒04
four papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. The Impact of Exposure to Refugees on Prosocial Behavior By Hager, Anselm; Valasek, Justin
  2. Occupational Regulation, Institutions, and Migrants' Labor Market Outcomes By Maria Koumenta; Mario Pagliero; Davud Rostam-Afschar
  3. Consumer Bankruptcy, Mortgage Default and Labor Supply By Wenli Li; Costas Meghir; Florian Oswald
  4. JAQ of All Trades: Job Mismatch, Firm Productivity and Managerial Quality By Luca Coraggio; Marco Pagano; Annalisa Scognamiglio; Joacim Tåg

  1. By: Hager, Anselm (Humbodt-Universität); Valasek, Justin (Dept. of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration)
    Abstract: Does exposure to refugees affect natives' prosocial behavior? If so, do changes in prosocial behavior also extend to existing migrants? We administer a survey of a representative sample of Lebanese respondents and measure their prosocial behavior toward Syrian refugees, Palestinian migrants, and other Lebanese. Combining our survey data and data on refugee settlements, we find that individual proximity to refugees is positively correlated with trust towards refugees, and that there is a positive spillover toward Palestinian migrants. Taken together, the evidence highlights how inter-group contact can help mitigate the negative effects of mass migration.
    Keywords: Migrants; prosocial behavior
    JEL: J01
    Date: 2022–03–15
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:nhheco:2022_004&r=
  2. By: Maria Koumenta (Queen Mary, University of London); Mario Pagliero (University of Turin, Collegio Carlo Alberto, CEPR); Davud Rostam-Afschar (University of Mannheim, University of Hohenheim)
    Abstract: We study how licensing, certification and unionisation affect the wages of natives and migrants and their representation among licensed, certified, and unionized workers. We provide evidence of a dual role of labor market institutions, which both screen workers based on unobservable characteristics and also provide them with wage setting power. Labor market institutions confer significant wage premia to native workers (3.9, 1.6, and 2.7 log points for licensing, certification, and unionization respectively), due to screening and wage setting power. Wage premia are significantly larger for licensed and certified migrants (10.2 and 6.6 log points), reflecting a more intense screening of migrant than native workers. The representation of migrants among licensed (but not certified or unionized) workers is 14% lower than that of natives. This implies a more intense screening of migrants by licensing institutions than by certification and unionization.
    Keywords: Occupational regulation, Licensing, Certification, Unionization, Migration, Wages
    JEL: J61 J31 J44 J71 J16
    Date: 2022–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2022-606&r=
  3. By: Wenli Li (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia); Costas Meghir (Cowles Foundation, Yale University, NBER, IZA, CEPR and IFS); Florian Oswald (SciencesPo, Paris)
    Abstract: We specify and estimate a lifecycle model of consumption, housing demand and labor supply in an environment where individuals may file for bankruptcy or default on their mortgage. Uncertainty in the model is driven by house price shocks, education specific productivity shocks, and catastrophic consumption events, while bankruptcy is governed by the basic institutional framework in the US as implied by Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. The model is estimated using micro data on credit reports and mortgages combined with data from the American Community Survey. We use the model to understand the relative importance of the two chapters (7 and 13) for each of our two education groups that differ in both preferences and wage profiles. We also provide an evaluation of the BAPCPA reform. Our paper demonstrates importance of distributional effects of Bankruptcy policy.
    Keywords: Lifecycle, Bankruptcy, Housing, Mortgage Default, Labor Supply, Consumption, Education, Insurance, Moral hazard
    JEL: G33 K35 J22 J31 D14 D18 D52 D53 E21
    Date: 2022–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2327&r=
  4. By: Luca Coraggio (Università di Napoli Federico II); Marco Pagano (University of Naples Federico II, CSEF and EIEF.); Annalisa Scognamiglio (Università di Napoli Federico II and CSEF); Joacim Tåg (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))
    Abstract: Does the matching between workers and jobs help explain productivity differentials across firms? To address this question we develop a job-worker allocation quality measure (JAQ) by combining employer-employee administrative data with machine learning techniques. The proposed measure is positively and significantly associated with labor earnings over workers’ careers. At firm level, it features a robust positive correlation with firm productivity, and with managerial turnover leading to an improvement in the quality and experience of management. JAQ can be constructed for any employer-employee data including workers’ occupations, and used to explore the effect of corporate restructuring on workers’ allocation and careers.
    Keywords: jobs, workers, matching, mismatch, machine learning, productivity, management.
    JEL: D22 D23 D24 G34 J24 J31 J62 L22 L23 M12 M54
    Date: 2022–03–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sef:csefwp:641&r=

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