nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2018‒12‒24
four papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. The Abolition of Immigration Restrictions and the Performance of Firms and Workers: Evidence from Switzerland By Andreas Beerli; Jan Ruffner; Michael Siegenthaler; Giovanni Peri
  2. Inequality and Well-Being By Borooah, Vani
  3. Strikes, Employee Workplace Representation, Unionism, and Industrial Relations Quality in European Establishments By John T. Addison; Paulino Teixeira
  4. On the Possibility of Progress By Romer, Paul M.

  1. By: Andreas Beerli; Jan Ruffner; Michael Siegenthaler; Giovanni Peri
    Abstract: We study a reform that granted European cross-border workers free access to the Swiss labor market. Our Differences-in-Differences estimations leverage the fact that regions close to the border were affected more intensely and earlier. The greater availability of cross-border workers increased their employment but also wages and possibly employment of highly educated native workers although the new cross-border workers were also highly educated. The reason is a simultaneous increase in labor demand in skill-intensive firms: the reform increased the size, productivity, innovation performance of some incumbent firms, attracted new firms, and created opportunities for natives to pursue managerial jobs.
    JEL: F22 J22 J24 J61
    Date: 2018–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25302&r=ltv
  2. By: Borooah, Vani
    Abstract: This chapter investigates a neglected area in the study of human development relating differences in human development between social groups in a country. Failure to take account of such inter-group inequalities might lead one to exaggerate a country’s developmental achievements. Conversely, one would get a more accurate picture of a country’s achievements with respect to human development only after one had taken cognisance of the fact that the fruits of development were unequally distributed between its various communities. There is a further issue. Not only are developmental fruits unequally distributed between groups, but these fruits may be unequally distributed within the groups. This chapter uses the methodology of “equity adjusted achievement” to compute human development indices and “extended” human development indices for a number of social groups in India.
    Keywords: Inequality, Well Being, Social Groups
    JEL: I31 I32
    Date: 2018–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:90554&r=ltv
  3. By: John T. Addison; Paulino Teixeira
    Abstract: Using cross-country data, this paper investigates the relationship between workplace representation and strikes. Works councils are associated with reduced strike activity. However, where union members make up a majority of works councillors, such union-dominated councils experience greater strike activity than do their counterparts with minority union membership, and also more strikes than establishments with union workplace representation where union members are in a minority. Dissonance between the parties as to the state of industrial relations is associated with elevated strike activity. Finally, union density at the workplace, if not the presence of collective bargaining, is directly associated with strike incidence.
    Keywords: works councils, employee representation, union density, level of collective bargaining, industrial relations quality/dissonance, strike incidence, strike duration, strike frequency, strike intensity
    JEL: J51 J52 J53 J83
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7360&r=ltv
  4. By: Romer, Paul M. (New York University)
    Abstract: Paul M. Romer delivered his Prize Lecture on 8 December 2018 at the Aula Magna, Stockholm University.
    Keywords: long-term growth;
    JEL: O00
    Date: 2018–12–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ris:nobelp:2018_004&r=ltv

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