nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2018‒01‒29
five papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Tony Atkinson and his legacy By Rolf Aaberge; François Bourguignon; Andrea Brandolini; Francisco H. G. Ferreira; Janet C. Gornick; John Hills; Markus Jäntti; Stephen P. Jenkins; Eric Marlier; John Micklewright; Brian Nolan; Thomas Piketty; Walter J. Radermacher; Timothy M. Smeeding; Nicholas H. Stern; Joseph Stiglitz; Holly Sutherland
  2. Who Got the Brexit Blues? Using a Quasi-Experiment to Show the Effect of Brexit on Subjective Wellbeing in the UK By Powdthavee, Nattavudh; Plagnol, Anke C.; Frijters, Paul; Clark, Andrew E.
  3. Are Poor Individuals Mainly Found in Poor Households? Evidence using Nutrition Data for Africa By Caitlin S. Brown; Martin Ravallion; Dominique van de Walle
  4. Do Preferences and Biases predict Life Outcomes? Evidence from Education and Labor Market Entry Decisions By Uschi Backes-Gellner; Holger Herz; Michael Kosfeld; Yvonne Oswald
  5. Early skill formation and the efficiency of parental investment By Doyle, Orla; Harmon, Colm; Heckman, James; Logue, Caitríona; Moon, Seong Hyeok

  1. By: Rolf Aaberge (Statistics Norway); François Bourguignon; Andrea Brandolini; Francisco H. G. Ferreira; Janet C. Gornick; John Hills; Markus Jäntti; Stephen P. Jenkins; Eric Marlier; John Micklewright; Brian Nolan; Thomas Piketty; Walter J. Radermacher; Timothy M. Smeeding; Nicholas H. Stern; Joseph Stiglitz; Holly Sutherland
    Abstract: Tony Atkinson is universally celebrated for his outstanding contributions to the measurement and analysis of inequality, but he never saw the study of inequality as a separate branch of economics. He was an economist in the classical sense, rejecting any sub-field labelling of his interests and expertise, and he made contributions right across economics. His death on 1 January 2017 deprived the world of both an intellectual giant and a deeply committed public servant in the broadest sense of the term. This collective tribute highlights the range, depth and importance of Tony’s enormous legacy, the product of over fifty years’ work.
    Date: 2017–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ssb:dispap:863&r=ltv
  2. By: Powdthavee, Nattavudh (University of Warwick); Plagnol, Anke C. (City University London); Frijters, Paul (London School of Economics); Clark, Andrew E. (Paris School of Economics)
    Abstract: We use the 2015-2016 waves of the UK Household Longitudinal Study (Understanding Society) to look at subjective wellbeing around the time of the June 2016 EU membership Referendum in the UK (Brexit). We find that those reporting a preference for leaving the EU were 0.14 points less satisfied with life pre-referendum, with both misery (life satisfaction below 5) and job uncertainty significantly predicting the preference for a Leave vote. Post-referendum, those with leave preferences enjoyed a life satisfaction rise of 0.16 points, while there was a drop of 0.15 points for those preferring to remain. The initial positive subjective wellbeing effect of the Brexit vote was particularly pronounced for male and older respondents who reported a preference for leaving the EU. However, adaptation to the Brexit result appears to be complete three months after the EU Referendum date, both for those who preferred continued EU membership and those who did not.
    Keywords: life satisfaction, Brexit, United Kingdom, democracy
    JEL: I14 I30 I31
    Date: 2017–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11206&r=ltv
  3. By: Caitlin S. Brown; Martin Ravallion; Dominique van de Walle
    Abstract: Antipoverty policies assume that targeting poor households suffices in reaching poor individuals. We question this assumption. Our comprehensive assessment for sub-Saharan Africa reveals that undernourished women and children are spread widely across the household wealth and consumption distributions. Roughly three-quarters of underweight women and undernourished children are not found in the poorest 20% of households, and around half are not found in the poorest 40%. Countries with higher undernutrition tend to have higher shares of undernourished individuals in non-poor households. The results are consistent with intra-household inequality but other factors also appear to be at work including common health risks.
    JEL: I14 I32 I38
    Date: 2017–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24047&r=ltv
  4. By: Uschi Backes-Gellner (University of Zurich); Holger Herz (University of Fribourg); Michael Kosfeld (Goethe University Frankfurt); Yvonne Oswald (University of Zurich)
    Abstract: Evidence suggests that acquiring human capital is related to better life outcomes, yet young peoples' decisions to invest in or stop acquiring human capital are still poorly understood. We investigate the role of time and reference-dependent preferences in such decisions. Using a data set that is unique in its combination of real-world observations on student outcomes and experimental data on economic preferences, we find that a low degree of long-run patience is a key determinant of dropping out of upper-secondary education. Further, for students who finish education we show that one month before termination of their program, present-biased students are less likely to have concrete continuation plans while loss averse students are more likely to have a definite job offer already. Our findings provide fresh evidence on students' decision-making about human capital acquisition and labor market transition with important implications for education and labor market policy.
    Keywords: Economic preferences, education, dropout, human capital, job search
    JEL: D01 D03 D91 I21 J64
    Date: 2018–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iso:educat:0144&r=ltv
  5. By: Doyle, Orla; Harmon, Colm; Heckman, James; Logue, Caitríona; Moon, Seong Hyeok
    Date: 2017
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:esr:wpaper:rb20170101&r=ltv

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