nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2011‒03‒19
three papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
University of the Republic

  1. The long-term effects of in-work benefits in a life-cycle model for policy evaluation By Richard Blundell; Monica Costa Dias; Costas Meghir; Jonathan Shaw
  2. Methods for Evaluating Innovative Health Programs (EIHP): A Multi-Country Study By Thomas, Ranjeeta; Jones, Andrew M; Squire, Lyn
  3. The Threat Effect of Participation in Active Labor Market Programs on Job Search Behavior of Migrants in Germany By Bergemann, Annette; Caliendo, Marco; van den Berg, Gerard J; Zimmermann, Klaus F

  1. By: Richard Blundell (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London); Monica Costa Dias (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies); Costas Meghir (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London); Jonathan Shaw (Institute for Fiscal Studies)
    Abstract: <p><p>This paper presents a life-cycle model of woman's labour supply, human capital formation and savings for the evaluation of welfare-to-work and tax policies. Women's decisions are formalised in a dynamic and uncertain environment. The model includes a detailed characterisation of the tax system and of the dynamics of family formation while explicitly considering the determinants of employment and education decisions: (i ) contemporaneous incentives to work, (ii ) future consequences for employment through human capital accumulation and (iii) anticipatory effects on the value of employment and education. The choice of parameters follows a careful calibration procedure, based of a large sample of data moments from the British population during the nineties using BHPS data. Many important features established in the empirical literature are reproduced in the simulation exercises, including the employment effects of the WFTC reform in the UK. The model is used to gain further insight into the responses to two recent policy changes, the October 1999 WFTC and the April 2003 WTC/CTC reforms. We find small but non-negligible anticipation effects on employment and education.</p></p>
    Date: 2011–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ifs:cemmap:07/11&r=ltv
  2. By: Thomas, Ranjeeta; Jones, Andrew M; Squire, Lyn
    Abstract: Designed as a global research initiative, the EIHP project aims at adding to the evidence base of health interventions that have the potential to improve health outcomes in Africa and Asia. The project focuses on rigorous, quantitative evaluations of innovative local initiatives that address the Millennium Development Goals for health: reductions in child and maternal mortality and communicable diseases. This overview brings together the outcomes and lessons from the project for evaluation methods. It draws together the methodological implications of carrying out impact evaluations under very different settings and emphasizes the need to build in evaluations in project designs.
    Keywords: Millennium Development Goals; child and maternal health; communicable diseases; impact evaluation; capacity building; Asia; Africa; Latin America
    JEL: C31 H53
    Date: 2010–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:29402&r=ltv
  3. By: Bergemann, Annette; Caliendo, Marco; van den Berg, Gerard J; Zimmermann, Klaus F
    Abstract: Labor market programs may affect unemployed individuals’ behavior before they enroll. Such ex ante effects may differ according to ethnic origin. We apply a novel method that relates self-reported perceived treatment rates and job search behavioral outcomes, such as the reservation wage or search intensity, to each other. We compare German native workers with migrants with a Turkish origin or Central and Eastern European (including Russian) background. Job search theory is used to derive theoretical predictions. We examine the omnibus ex ante effect of the German ALMP system, using the novel IZA Evaluation Data Set, which includes self-reported assessments of the variables of interest as well as an unusually detailed amount of information on behavior, attitudes and past outcomes. We find that the ex ante threat effect on the reservation wage and search effort varies considerably among the groups considered.
    Keywords: active labor market policy; expectations; immigrants; policy evaluation; program evaluation; reservation wage; search effort; unemployment duration
    JEL: C21 D83 D84 J61 J64
    Date: 2011–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8295&r=ltv

This nep-ltv issue is ©2011 by Maximo Rossi. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.