nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2010‒04‒04
three papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
University of the Republic

  1. Perceived Job Insecurity and Well-Being Revisited: Towards Conceptual Clarity By Ingo Geishecker
  2. Child Poverty and Child Well-Being in Italy By Del Boca Daniela
  3. Price, wage and employment response to shocks: evidence from the WDN survey By Bertola, Giuseppe; Dabusinskas, Aurelijus; Hoeberichts, Marco; Izquierdo, Mario; Kwapil, Claudia

  1. By: Ingo Geishecker
    Abstract: This paper analyzes the impact of job insecurity perceptions on individual well-being. In contrast to previous studies, we explicitly take into account perceptions about both the likelihood and the potential costs of job loss and demonstrate that most contributions to the literature suffer from simultaneity bias. When accounting for simultaneity, we find the true unbiased effect of perceived job insecurity to be more than twice the size of naive estimates. Accordingly, perceived job insecurity ranks as one of the most important factors in employees' well-being and can be even more harmful than actual job loss with subsequent unemployment.
    Keywords: job security, life satisfaction, unemployment
    JEL: D84 J63 Z13
    Date: 2010
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp282&r=ltv
  2. By: Del Boca Daniela (University of Turin)
    Date: 2010–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:uto:dipeco:201001&r=ltv
  3. By: Bertola, Giuseppe; Dabusinskas, Aurelijus; Hoeberichts, Marco; Izquierdo, Mario; Kwapil, Claudia
    Abstract: This paper analyses information from survey data collected in the framework of the Eurosystem's Wage Dynamics Network (WDN) on patterns of firm-level adjustment to shocks. We document that the relative intensity and the character of price vs. cost and wage vs. employment adjustments in response to cost-push shocks depend - in theoretically sensible ways - on the intensity of competition in firms' product markets, on the importance of collective wage bargaining and on other structural and institutional features of firms and of their environment. Focusing on the passthrough of cost shocks to prices, our results suggest that the pass-through is lower in highly competitive firms. Furthermore, a high degree of employment protection and collective wage agreements tend to make this pass-through stronger. --
    Keywords: Wage bargaining,labour-market institutions,survey data,European Union
    JEL: J31 J38 P50
    Date: 2010
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:bubdp1:201002&r=ltv

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