nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2005‒10‒15
eight papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Social capital By Durlauf,S.N.; Fafchamps,M.
  2. Beauty, gender and stereotypes : evidence from laboratory experiments By Andreoni,J.; Petrie,R.
  3. Philantropy By Andreoni,J.
  4. Social interaction models By Durlauf,S.N.; Cohen-Cole,E.
  5. The Impact of Gender Segregation on Male-Female Wage Differentials: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data for Spain By Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes; Sara de la Rica
  6. Using Efficiency Analysis to Measure Individual Well-Being with an Illustration for Catalonia By Xavi Ramos
  7. Poverty in America: Trends and Explanations By Hilary Hoynes; Marianne Page; Ann Stevens
  8. More on Unemployment and Vacancy Fluctuations By Dale T. Mortensen

  1. By: Durlauf,S.N.; Fafchamps,M. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute)
    Date: 2004
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:att:wimass:200412&r=ltv
  2. By: Andreoni,J.; Petrie,R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute)
    Date: 2004
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:att:wimass:20046&r=ltv
  3. By: Andreoni,J. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute)
    Date: 2004
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:att:wimass:20047&r=ltv
  4. By: Durlauf,S.N.; Cohen-Cole,E. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Social Systems Research Institute)
    Date: 2004
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:att:wimass:20048&r=ltv
  5. By: Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes (San Diego State University and IZA Bonn); Sara de la Rica (Universidad del País Vasco and IZA Bonn)
    Abstract: This paper presents new evidence on the role of gender segregation within industry, occupation, establishment, and occupation-establishment cells in explaining gender wage differentials of full-time salaried workers in Spain during 1995 and 2002. Using data from the Spanish Wage Structure Surveys, we find that the raw gender wage gap decreased from 0.26 to 0.22 over the course of seven years. However, even after accounting for workers’ human capital, job characteristics, and female segregation into lower-paying industries, occupations, establishments, and occupations within establishments, women still earned approximately 13 percent and 16 percent less than similar male counterparts as of 1995 and 2002, respectively. Most of the gender wage gap is attributable to workers’ sex. Yet, female segregation into lower-paying occupations within establishments, establishments and industries accounted for a sizable and growing fraction of the female-male wage differential.
    Keywords: gender wage differentials, female segregation, matched employer-employee data
    JEL: J16 J7
    Date: 2005–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1742&r=ltv
  6. By: Xavi Ramos (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and IZA Bonn)
    Abstract: This paper shows how distance functions, a tool typically employed in production economics to measure the distance between a set of inputs and a set of outputs, can be employed to approximate a composite measure encompassing the many dimensions of well-being. It also illustrates how to implement the methodology originally put forth by Lovell et al. (1994), using new data for Catalonia. We draw policy implications and critically appraise the discussed methodology suggesting avenues for further research.
    Keywords: well-being, multidimensional poverty, distance function, Catalonia
    JEL: D31 D63 I31 I32
    Date: 2005–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1748&r=ltv
  7. By: Hilary Hoynes; Marianne Page; Ann Stevens
    Abstract: Despite robust growth in real per capita GDP over the last three decades, the U.S. poverty rate has changed very little. In an effort to better understand this disconnect, we document and quantify the relationship between poverty and four different factors that may affect poverty and its evolution over time: labor market opportunities, family structure, anti-poverty programs, and immigration. We find that the relationship between the macro-economy and poverty has weakened over time. Nevertheless, changes in labor market opportunities predict changes in the poverty rate rather well. We also find that changes in female labor supply should have reduced poverty, but was counteracted by an increase in the rate of female headship. Changes in the number and composition of immigrants and changes in the generosity of anti-poverty programs seem to have had little effect.
    JEL: I32 I38 J21
    Date: 2005–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11681&r=ltv
  8. By: Dale T. Mortensen
    Abstract: Shimer (2005a) argues that the Mortensen-Pissarides equilibrium search model of unemployment grossly under predicts the size of the response in the job finding rate to a productivity shock. Some of the recent papers inspired by his critique are reviewed and commented on here. Specifically, I suggest that the problem is not procylciality of the wage, as Shimer, Hall (2005), and Hall and Milgrom (2005) argue, or a failure to account fully for the opportunity cost of employment, as Hagedorn and Manovskii (2005) contend. Instead, I show that a properly calibrated variant of the model, one that accounts for capital cost, counter cyclic involuntary separations, and the large flow of workers from job-to-job, can explain the observed volatility of the job finding rate.
    JEL: E2 G0 J0
    Date: 2005–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11692&r=ltv

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