nep-ltv New Economics Papers
on Unemployment, Inequality and Poverty
Issue of 2005‒05‒14
two papers chosen by
Maximo Rossi
Universidad de la República

  1. Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the U.K. and Germany By Christian Dustmann; Sonia C. Pereira
  2. Women, Men and Housework Time Allocation: Theory and Empirical Results By Martina Lauk; Susanne Meyer

  1. By: Christian Dustmann (University College London and IZA Bonn); Sonia C. Pereira (University College London and Yale University)
    Abstract: This paper investigates job mobility and estimates the returns to tenure and experience in the United Kingdom and Germany. We show evidence that job mobility is higher in the UK than in Germany, and that job movers may be negatively selected in Germany, but not in the UK. Our findings suggest that returns to experience are substantially higher in the UK. According to our estimates, ten years of labour market experience are associated with average wage returns of around 70 percent in the UK and 30 percent in Germany. Separate estimates for different qualification groups show that in Germany, it is the group of workers with apprenticeship training that is driving the low returns to labour market experience, while wages growth due to labour market experience is similar between the two countries for the other skill groups. Furthermore, returns to tenure are close to zero in both countries, while wage growth due to the macro trend is markedly higher in Germany.
    Keywords: returns to seniority, job mobility, asymmetric information
    JEL: J24 J31
    Date: 2005–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1586&r=ltv
  2. By: Martina Lauk (Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre (Department of Economics), Technische Universität Darmstadt (Darmstadt University of Technology)); Susanne Meyer (Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre (Department of Economics), Technische Universität Darmstadt (Darmstadt University of Technology))
    Abstract: The gender relationship, characterised to a high degree by the gender-specific division of labour into paid work and housework, is in the process of change. In Germany, however, housework continues to be considered a typically female chore. The present study considers the empirical relevance of three theoretical approaches to gender-specific time allocation from the economic and social sciences. The various models are assessed using the Socioeconomic Panel (SOEP) for the year 2000. The estimation results imply that no single theory can be favoured as opposed to any other. Accordingly, prevalent approaches to the explanation of household division of labour are at the same time equally suited and unsuited to grasping the problem empirically. A person's individual housework time is determined by both economic and ideological characteristics. Following on from the evaluation of different theories, an approach is evaluated which simultaneously takes individual work time and paid work time into account. This integrative evaluation shows that the economic rational choice model finds only limited application in the area of private households, thus pointing to the necessity for an interdisciplinary treatment of the subject.
    Keywords: time allocation, household division of labour, SOEP data
    JEL: J22 J16
    Date: 2005–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tud:ddpiec:143&r=ltv

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