nep-ind New Economics Papers
on Industrial Organization
Issue of 2018‒03‒19
four papers chosen by
Kwang Soo Cheong
Johns Hopkins University

  1. Collusion and bargaining in asymmetric cournot duopoly: An experiment By Fischer, Christian; Normann, Hans-Theo
  2. Algorithmic Collusion in Cournot Duopoly Market: Evidence from Experimental Economics By Nan Zhou; Li Zhang; Shijian Li; Zhijian Wang
  3. The Welfare Effects of Peer Entry in the Accommodation Market: The Case of Airbnb By Chiara Farronato; Andrey Fradkin
  4. Firms and social policy preferences under weak institutions : Evidence from Russia By Marques II, Israel

  1. By: Fischer, Christian; Normann, Hans-Theo
    Abstract: In asymmetric dilemma games without side payments, players face involved cooperation and bargaining problems. The maximization of joint profits is implausible, players disagree on the collusive action, and the outcome is often inefficient. For the example of a Cournot duopoly with asymmetric cost, we investigate experimentally how players cooperate (collude implicitly and explicitly), if at all, in such games. We find that, without communication, players fail to cooperate and essentially play the static Nash equilibrium, confirming previous results. With communication, inefficient firms gain at the expense of efficient ones. When the role of the efficient firm is earned in a contest, the efficient firm earns higher profits than when this role is randomly allocated. Bargaining solutions do not satisfactorily predict collusive outcomes. Finally, when given the choice to talk, the efficient firms often decline that option.
    Keywords: asymmetries,bargaining,cartels,communication,Cournot,earned role,experiments
    JEL: C7 C9 L4 L41
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:dicedp:283&r=ind
  2. By: Nan Zhou; Li Zhang; Shijian Li; Zhijian Wang
    Abstract: Algorithmic collusion is an emerging concept in current artificial intelligence age. Whether algorithmic collusion is a creditable threat remains as an argument. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which can extort its human rival to collude in a Cournot duopoly competing market. In experiments, we show that, the algorithm can successfully extorted its human rival and gets higher profit in long run, meanwhile the human rival will fully collude with the algorithm. As a result, the social welfare declines rapidly and stably. Both in theory and in experiment, our work confirms that, algorithmic collusion can be a creditable threat. In application, we hope, the frameworks, the algorithm design as well as the experiment environment illustrated in this work, can be an incubator or a test bed for researchers and policymakers to handle the emerging algorithmic collusion.
    Date: 2018–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:1802.08061&r=ind
  3. By: Chiara Farronato; Andrey Fradkin
    Abstract: We study the effects of enabling peer supply through Airbnb in the accommodation industry. We present a model of competition between flexible and dedicated sellers - peer hosts and hotels - who provide differentiated products. We estimate this model using data from major US cities and quantify the welfare effects of Airbnb on travelers, hosts, and hotels. The welfare gains from Airbnb are concentrated in locations (New York) and times (New Year’s Eve) when hotels are capacity constrained. This occurs because peer hosts are responsive to market conditions, expand supply as hotels fill up, and keep hotel prices down as a result.
    JEL: D4 D6 L1 L22 L23 L85 L86
    Date: 2018–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24361&r=ind
  4. By: Marques II, Israel
    Abstract: When does business support the expansion of social policy in the developing world? Existing work on managers’ preferences has tended to concentrate on the developed world, where governments can credibly commit to policy, tax evasion is constrained, and mechanisms exist to hold the bureaucracy accountable for policy implementation. In this paper, I relax these assumptions, arguing that weak institutions create opportunities for some firms to shift costs onto others: making social policy more attractive. I argue that firms with political connections are uniquely positioned to benefit from subsidies and property rights protection, which decreases the cost of social policy, while firms with low visibility can evade taxes and free-ride off universalistic social policy. Such firms will support social policy even where institutions are poor. I test this argument using a survey of 666 firms in 10 Russian regions.
    JEL: L21 L33 O15 H53
    Date: 2018–02–23
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bof:bofitp:2018_007&r=ind

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