nep-ind New Economics Papers
on Industrial Organization
Issue of 2013‒05‒11
three papers chosen by
Kwang Soo Cheong
Johns Hopkins University

  1. Does size or age of innovative firms affect their growth persistence? Evidence from a panel of innovative Spanish firms By Daria Ciriaci; Pietro Moncada-Paterno-Castello; Peter Voigt
  2. A Model of Competition in the Solar Panel Industry By Pillai, Unni; McLaughlin, Jamison
  3. The international mercury cartel, 1928-1949 By López-Morell, Miguel A.; Segreto, Luciano

  1. By: Daria Ciriaci (Inter-American Development Bank); Pietro Moncada-Paterno-Castello (JRC-IPTS); Peter Voigt (University of Barcelona)
    Abstract: This study examines serial correlation in employment, sales and innovative sales growth rates in a balanced panel of 3,300 Spanish firms over the years 2002-2009, obtained by matching different waves of the Spanish Encuesta sobre Innovacion en las Empresas, the Spanish innovation survey conducted annually by the Spanish National Statistics Institute (INE). The main objective is to verify whether the changes (increase/decrease) in these figures are persistent over time, whether such persistence (if any) differs between SMEs and larger firms, and if it is affected by a firm's age. To do so, we adopted a semi-parametric quantile regression approach. This methodology is well suited to cases where outliers (high-growth firms) are the subject of investigation and/or when they have to be assumed as being very heterogeneous. Empirical results indicate that among those innovative firms experiencing high employment growth, the smaller and younger grow faster than larger firms, but the jobs they create are not persistent over time. However, while being smaller and younger helps growing more in terms of employment and sales, it is not an advantage when innovative sales growth is considered: in this case larger firms experience faster growth.
    Keywords: Serial correlation; quantile regression model; Spanish firms; firm size, firm age; job creation; fast growing firms.
    JEL: L11 L25
    Date: 2012–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc74052&r=ind
  2. By: Pillai, Unni; McLaughlin, Jamison
    Abstract: We develop a model of competition in the solar panel industry. Solar firms manufacture panels that are differentiated both vertically and horizontally, and compete by setting quantities. The equilibrium of the model is consistent with a set of stylized facts that we document, including variation in prices, markups and market shares across firms. We calibrate the model using a new dataset data on prices, costs and shipments of leading solar companies, as well as solar sales in four leading markets. The calibrated model is applied to evaluate the impact of a decline in the price of polysilicon, a key raw material used in the manufacture of solar panels, on the equilibrium price of solar panels.
    Keywords: Solar, Photovoltaics, Competition, Polysilicon
    JEL: L11 Q40 Q42
    Date: 2013–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:46655&r=ind
  3. By: López-Morell, Miguel A.; Segreto, Luciano
    Abstract: Mercury has been one of the most persistent cases in contemporary history of international market regulations and this in spite of its having been affected by important technological changes and the regular discovery of new deposits. This paper offers an approach to the least known period, although perhaps the one in which the greatest rises in process and production occurred as a consequence of market manipulation. The period coincides with a series of agreements between the Spanish and the Italian producers and the outcome was a worldwide cartel known as “Mercurio Europeo” which came into being in 1928. The aims of this work will, therefore, be first to describe the features of the various stages of development of the international mercury market during the first half of the twentieth century, with emphasis on the characteristics and conditioning factors in each period. Secondly, the objective is to analyze the various market agreements that came about, the effectiveness of the clauses therein, the construction of distribution networks and the influence that the increase in production had on other mines and on certain technological developments.
    Keywords: Mercury, Cartels, International trade, history
    JEL: D43 F1 F12 N54
    Date: 2013
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:46772&r=ind

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