nep-ind New Economics Papers
on Industrial Organization
Issue of 2009‒02‒07
three papers chosen by
Kwang Soo Cheong
Johns Hopkins University

  1. Imitators and Optimizers in Cournot Oligopoly By Schipper, Burkhard
  2. Prices and Profits in Dominant Firm Adjudication By Scherer, F. M.
  3. Short-run Birth and Death of U.S. Manufacturing Firms: 2000 - 2005 By Brown, Jason P.; Lambert, Dayton M.

  1. By: Schipper, Burkhard (U of California, Davis)
    Abstract: We analyze a symmetric n-firm Cournot oligopoly with a heterogeneous population of optimizers and imitators. Imitators mimic the output decision of the most successful firms of the previous round a la Vega-Redondo (1997). Optimizers play a myopic best response to the opponents' previous output. Firms are allowed to make mistakes and deviate from their decision rules with a small probability. Applying stochastic stability analysis, we find that the long run distribution converges to a recurrent set of states in which imitators are better off than are optimizers. This finding appears to be robust even when optimizers are more sophisticated. It suggests that imitators drive optimizers out of the market contradicting a fundamental conjecture by Friedman (1953).
    JEL: C72
    Date: 2008–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ecl:ucdeco:05-37&r=ind
  2. By: Scherer, F. M. (Harvard U)
    Abstract: Written for a conference at the University of Lisbon, this paper analyzes policies toward prices and profits in competition policy actions targeting dominant or monopolistic enterprises. Its motivation came from dilemmas posed by the European Commission's recent actions with respect to the Microsoft Corporation. The paper traces reasons why competition policy enforcers have been reluctant to assess the reasonableness of prices and profits and to prescribe changes in price levels. It identifies cases in which such oversight is essential for effective policy implementation. Drawing upon the Microsoft experience, it asks whether governmental intervention with respect to intellectual property licenses and the royalties they carry jeopardizes technological progress. An optimistic conclusion is reached.
    Date: 2008–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp08-051&r=ind
  3. By: Brown, Jason P.; Lambert, Dayton M.
    Abstract: Attracting manufacturing investment remains a viable regional development policy. Previous research in the location literature has informed policymakers which factors are most important for attracting new firm investment. Far less is known about the dynamics of firm death and the possible interaction with firm birth. A conceptual model of county-level investment in the U.S. manufacturing sector is developed from location theory and subsequent literature. Specifically, we test the relative importance of location factors influencing firm investment, and if these factors influence firm birth and death differently. Local factors include labor quality, availability, and cost, market conditions, agglomeration due to localization and urbanization economies, infrastructure, and fiscal policy. This study covers the time period 2000 to 2004 for U.S. counties in the lower 48 states. Firm data are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Dynamic Firm Data Series, which links establishments across space and time. Regional adjustment models are used to show how ceteris paribus changes in location factors affect the birth and death rates in a county.
    Keywords: location factors, manufacturing, creative destruction, Community/Rural/Urban Development, L60, R11, R12,
    Date: 2009
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:saeana:46739&r=ind

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