nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2022‒12‒19
three papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

  1. Measuring Progress By O'Connor, Kelsey J.
  2. Teleworking and Life Satisfaction during COVID-19: The Importance of Family Structure By Claudia Senik; Andrew E. Clark; Conchita d'Ambrosio; Anthony Lepinteur; Carsten Schröder
  3. Decentring GDP: Well-being, care and time By Vaca-Trigo, Iliana; Baron, Camila

  1. By: O'Connor, Kelsey J. (STATEC Research – National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies)
    Abstract: Societal progress is characterized primarily as an improvement in the distribution of well-being; however, a small set of additional variables are also necessary. Social indicators based on objective measures are inherently limited by the subjective assessments necessary of "experts" to select and combine measures into indicators. Subjective well-being overcomes this limitation but is insufficient to guide all policy decisions and address certain issues, especially those relating to future concerns. Subjective well-being is the single most important, but necessarily not the only, indicator of progress. This entry also briefly discusses: recent history of well-being measurement; what makes people better off in theory; the difference between subjective and 'objective' measures of well-being; their limitations; what we need to improve measures of progress, and examples of government implementation of well-being indicators.
    Keywords: well-being, wellbeing, societal progress, quality of life, GDP, subjective well-being, social indicators, beyond GDP, SDGs, life satisfaction
    JEL: I31 O10
    Date: 2022–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izapps:pp194&r=hap
  2. By: Claudia Senik (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, SU - Sorbonne Université); Andrew E. Clark (PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Conchita d'Ambrosio (Uni.lu - Université du Luxembourg); Anthony Lepinteur (Uni.lu - Université du Luxembourg); Carsten Schröder (DIW Berlin - Deutsches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung)
    Abstract: We carry out a difference-indifferences analysis of a representative real-time survey conducted as part of the German SocioEconomic Panel (SOEP) study and show that teleworking had a negative average effect on life satisfaction over the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. This average effect hides considerable heterogeneity reflecting genderrole asymmetry: lower life satisfaction is only found for unmarried men and women with school-age children. The negative effect for women with school-age children disappears in 2021, suggesting adaptation to new constraints and/or the adoption of coping strategies.
    Keywords: Life Satisfaction,Teleworking,Work from Home,Gender,Childcare,COVID-19,SOEP
    Date: 2022–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-03855653&r=hap
  3. By: Vaca-Trigo, Iliana; Baron, Camila
    Abstract: In recent years, a number of proposals have highlighted how restrictive it is to use gross domestic product (GDP) as a measure of well-being. This document takes up those criticisms and also showcases the limitations of GDP as a measure of output. What GDP measures and what it excludes is a product of conventions that reflect androcentric biases. The failure to appraise natural resources and non-remunerated services produced by households results in a skewed perspective on the economy that focuses on markets and neglects other processes that are essential to human life. The Latin American and Caribbean region has a long history of political and technical agreements that emphasize the importance for societies of issues such as care, time distribution and well-being. The document proposes measuring what societies value and for decision-making to take on board measurements that complement GDP, time-use indicators in particular.
    Keywords: PRODUCTO INTERNO BRUTO, CONDICIONES ECONOMICAS, BIENESTAR SOCIAL, HOGARES, TRABAJO NO REMUNERADO, TIEMPO, VALOR, MEDICION, INDICADORES DEL DESARROLLO, GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT, ECONOMIC CONDITIONS, SOCIAL WELFARE, HOUSEHOLDS, UNPAID WORK, TIME, VALUE, MEASUREMENT, DEVELOPMENT INDICATORS
    Date: 2022–09–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ecr:col022:48157&r=hap

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