nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2019‒04‒15
two papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

  1. The Impact of Bullying Victimisation on Mental Wellbeing By Chrysanthou, Georgios Marios; Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis
  2. Living Conditions and the Mental Health and Well-being of Refugees: Evidence from a Representative German Panel Study By Lena Walther; Lukas M. Fuchs; Jürgen Schupp; Christian von Scheve

  1. By: Chrysanthou, Georgios Marios (University of Sheffield); Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis
    Abstract: We investigate the impact of nine types of adolescent (verbal, physical, indirect) school/domestic bullying on life satisfaction, and two mental health outcomes (emotional symptoms and hyperactivity/inattention) using the Understanding Society dataset during 2009-13. Bullying significantly increases hyperactive, inattentive and emotional symptoms and reduces life satisfaction. Non-domestic bullying has a stronger adverse impact on all three mental wellbeing outcomes. Domestic sibling victimisation does not affect life satisfaction. Lower levels of family income increase adolescent hyperactive/inattentive symptoms and reduce life satisfaction. Females are more vulnerable to emotional symptoms while males report higher levels of life satisfaction. Initial conditions precondition hyperactive and inattentive symptoms.
    Keywords: bullying, mental health, life satisfaction, unobserved heterogeneity
    JEL: C25 C35 J12 J13 I31 I10
    Date: 2019–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12206&r=all
  2. By: Lena Walther; Lukas M. Fuchs; Jürgen Schupp; Christian von Scheve
    Abstract: The mental health and well-being of refugees are both prerequisites for and indicators of social integration. Using data from the first wave of a representative prospective panel of refugees living in Germany, we investigated how different living conditions, especially those subject to integration policies, are associated with experienced distress and life satisfaction in newly-arrived adult refugees. In particular, we investigated how the outcome of the asylum process, family reunification, housing conditions, participation in integration and language courses, being in education or working, social interaction with the native population, and language skills are related to mental health and well-being. Our findings show that negative and pending outcomes of the asylum process and separation from family are related to higher levels of distress and lower levels of life satisfaction. Living in communal instead of private housing is also associated with greater distress and lower life satisfaction. Being employed, by contrast, is related to reduced distress. Contact to members of the host society and better host country language skills are also related to lower levels of distress and higher levels of life satisfaction. Our findings offer insights into correlates of refugees’ well-being in the first years after arrival in a host country, a dimension of integration often overlooked in existing studies, thus having the potential to inform decision-making in a highly contested policy area.
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp1029&r=all

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