nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2019‒02‒04
five papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

  1. The effect of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being By Kavetsos, Georgios; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kyriopoulos, Ilias; Vandoros, Sotiris
  2. Well-being, political decentralisation and governance quality in Europe By Andrés Rodríguez-Pose; Vassilis Tselios
  3. Justice Delayed Is Assimilation Denied: Rightwing Terror, Fear and Social Assimilation of Turkish Immigrants in Germany By Sumit S. Deole
  4. The Role of Body Weight for Health, Earnings and Life Satisfaction By Hübler, Olaf
  5. Towards a Framework for Time Use, Welfare and Household-centric Economic Measurement By Diane Coyle; Leonard Nakamura

  1. By: Kavetsos, Georgios; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kyriopoulos, Ilias; Vandoros, Sotiris
    Abstract: We study the effect of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being in the United Kingdom. Using a quasi-experimental design, we find that this outcome led to an overall decrease in subjective well-being in the UK compared to a control group. The effect is driven by individuals who hold an overall positive attitude towards the EU and shows little signs of adaptation. Subjective well-being of those with a very negative attitude towards the EU increases in the short-run but turns negative, possibly due to unmet expectations. Using three different measures of socio-economic connection between the UK and other European countries, we generally do not find evidence supporting the presence of spillover effects of the Brexit referendum result on subjective well-being of individuals in other EU countries.
    Keywords: subjective well-being; happiness; Brexit; referendum; election
    JEL: D72 I30 I31 I38
    Date: 2018–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:91709&r=all
  2. By: Andrés Rodríguez-Pose; Vassilis Tselios
    Abstract: The well-being and welfare of their citizens through a fair and efficient distribution of these public goods and services. However, ?who? delivers these goods and services and ?how well? they are delivered are essential in determining outcomes in terms of well-being. Drawing on data from the European Social Survey database, this paper uses Amartya Sen?s social welfare index framework ? accounting for the trade-off between the maximization of public sector resources and an equitable distribution of these resources ? to examine the influence of political decentralisation (?who? delivers the resources) and whether this influence is moderated by governance quality (?how well? they are delivered) on individual subjective well-being. The findings of the econometric analysis reveal that decentralisation does not always lead to higher well-being, as the benefits of political decentralisation are highly mediated by the quality of national governance. In countries with high governance quality, political decentralisation results in a greater satisfaction with health provision, while in lower quality governance countries, a more decentralized government can increase the overall satisfaction with life, the economy, government, democracy and the provision of education, but not necessarily with health-related services.
    Keywords: well-being, political decentralisation, quality of governance, Europe, European Social Survey
    JEL: I31 H70 H11
    Date: 2019–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:egu:wpaper:1902&r=all
  3. By: Sumit S. Deole
    Abstract: Using the German Socioeconomic Panel (SOEP) data, this paper offers the first evidence that the 2011 news revelations about crimes committed by National Socialist Underground (NSU) network in early the 2000s resulted in an increase in worries about xenophobic hostility among NSU’s targeted groups. This serves as an indication of the minority’s perceived maltreatment by German institutions while investigating the NSU crimes. The results further show that the revelations significantly reinforced a feeling of estrangement among Turks, who were now less likely to self-identify as Germans and more likely to see themselves as foreigners; they, therefore, tended to bond more strongly with the ethos of their country of origin. The results also demonstrate that Turks reported a substantial decrease in their health satisfaction and subjective wellbeing. In conclusion, the paper underlines the pertinence of judicial efficacy over rightwing crimes for assimilation and welfare of immigrants.
    Keywords: Rightwing crimes, immigration, delayed justice, social assimilation
    JEL: D63 F22 J15 Z10
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp1005&r=all
  4. By: Hübler, Olaf (Leibniz University of Hannover)
    Abstract: Based on the German Socio-Economic Panel, the influence of the body mass index on health, earnings and satisfaction is analysed by gender. Basic results are: health worsens, income declines and satisfaction is poorer with higher body mass index. If control variables are added, estimates are split by gender and different effects of over- and underweight people are determined, the health estimates show nonlinear effects but the direction of action is unchanged. Effects on earnings differ. Underweight women earn more and overweight less than others. For normal-weight men the income is on average higher than for over- and underweight men. This is also confirmed for self-employed persons. The pattern for employees is equal to the total sample. No effects on life satisfaction can be found except for underweight men. They reveal less satisfaction. Only in the public sector the sign of the coefficient changes. The results for eastern Germany are different with respect to satisfaction. Overweight women are less satisfied than others while this is not confirmed for underweight men from eastern Germany. When interdependencies are taken into account and matching procedures are applied, the outcome matches to that of independent and unmatched estimates. However, no clear-cut disadvantage in income of underweight men can be found. Stable coefficients result for the health estimates while satisfaction results fluctuate. Underweight women and especially underweight men tend to less happiness. For overweight men the influence is ambiguous but more speaks in favour of a less level of satisfaction. Overweight women seem to be happier.
    Keywords: over- and underweight, health, income, satisfaction, gender, self-confidence, wage earners vs. self-employed, private vs. public sector, Eastern vs. Western Germany, interdependencies, matching
    JEL: I15 I31 J16 J31
    Date: 2019–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12078&r=all
  5. By: Diane Coyle; Leonard Nakamura
    Abstract: What is meant by economic progress and how should it be measured? The conventional answer is growth in real GDP over time or compared across countries, a monetary measure adjusted for the general rate of increase in prices. However, there is increasing interest in developing an alternative understanding of economic progress, particularly in the context of digitalization of the economy and the consequent significant changes internet use is bringing about in production and household activity. This paper discusses one alternative approach, combining an extended utility framework considering time allocation over paid work, household work, leisure and consumption with measures of objective or subjective well-being while engaging in different activities. Developing this wider economic welfare measure would require the collection of time use statistics as well as well-being data and direct survey evidence, such as the willingness to pay for leisure time. We advocate an experimental set of time and well-being accounts, with a particular focus on the digitally-driven shifts in behavior.
    Keywords: Time use, well-being, GDP
    JEL: D11 D60 I31
    Date: 2019–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nsr:escoed:escoe-dp-2019-01&r=all

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