nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2016‒06‒14
two papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca

  1. Does consuming more make you happier? Evidence from Chinese panel data By Wang, Haining; Cheng, Zhiming; Smyth, Russell
  2. Inequalities in Adolescent Health and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study By Yekaterina Chzhen; Zlata Bruckauf; Kwok Ng; Daria Pavlova; Torbjorn Torsheim; Margarida Gaspar de Matos; UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre

  1. By: Wang, Haining; Cheng, Zhiming; Smyth, Russell
    Abstract: This study examines the relationship between consumption and happiness, using panel data from China Family Panel Studies (CFPS). We find that total consumption expenditure has a significant and positive effect on happiness, but we find no evidence of a non-linear relationship between consumption and happiness. There are heterogeneous effects of consumption on happiness across subsamples and for different types of consumption expenditure. We find that relative consumption matters, irrespective if the reference group is de-fined in terms of consumption at the community or county level or on the basis of age, education and gender. However, the extent to which comparison effects are upward looking, or asymmetric, depend on how the comparison group is defined. We also find that comparison with one’s past consumption has no significant effect on an individual’s happiness.
    Keywords: happiness, consumption, China
    JEL: A13 E21 I31 N35
    Date: 2015–07–24
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bof:bofitp:2015_021&r=hap
  2. By: Yekaterina Chzhen; Zlata Bruckauf; Kwok Ng; Daria Pavlova; Torbjorn Torsheim; Margarida Gaspar de Matos; UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre
    Abstract: International studies of inequalities in adolescent health tend to focus on the socio-economic gradient in average outcomes rather than their dispersion within countries. Although understanding the extent to which differences in health are related to socio-economic disadvantage is important, focusing exclusively on socio-economic status risks neglecting differences in the distribution of health outcomes within and between countries. To fill this research gap, this study analyses variation in the extent of inequality in the lower half of the distribution in five indicators of adolescent health and well-being – health symptoms, physical activity, healthy eating, unhealthy eating, and life satisfaction – across EU and/or OECD countries that took part in the latest cycle of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study.
    Keywords: adolescent health; household surveys; inequality; physical development;
    Date: 2016
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa835&r=hap

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