nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2013‒03‒23
two papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
University of Milano-Bicocca

  1. The Earned Income Tax Credit, Health, and Happiness By Boyd-Swan, Casey; Herbst, Chris M.; Ifcher, John; Zarghamee, Homa
  2. Management-Employee Relations, Firm Size, and Job Satisfaction By Aysit Tansel; Saziye Gazioglu

  1. By: Boyd-Swan, Casey (Arizona State University); Herbst, Chris M. (Arizona State University); Ifcher, John (Santa Clara University); Zarghamee, Homa (Barnard College)
    Abstract: This paper contributes to the small but growing literature evaluating the health effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). In particular, we use data from the National Survey of Families and Households to study the impact of the 1990 federal EITC expansion on several outcomes related to mental health and subjective well-being. The identification strategy relies on a difference-in-differences framework to estimate intent-to-treat effects for the post-reform period. Our results suggest that the 1990 EITC reform generated sizeable health benefits for low-skilled mothers. Such women experienced lower depression symptomatology, an increase in self-reported happiness, and improved self-efficacy relative to their childless counterparts. Consistent with previous work, we find that married mothers captured most of the health benefits, with unmarried mothers' health changing very little following the 1990 EITC reform.
    Keywords: Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), happiness, health, subjective well-being
    JEL: I1 J00
    Date: 2013–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7261&r=hap
  2. By: Aysit Tansel (Department of Economics Middle East Technical University and Institute for the Study of labor (IZA) Bonn, Germany and Economic Research Forum (ERF) Cairo, Egypt); Saziye Gazioglu (Middle East Technical University and Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen)
    Abstract: This paper investigates the job satisfaction in relation to managerial attitudes towards employees and firm size using the linked employer-employee survey results in Britain. We first investigate the management-employee relationships and the firm size using maximum likelihood probit estimation. Next various measures of job satisfaction are related to the management-employee relations via maximum likelihood ordered probit estimates. Four measures of job satisfaction that have not been used often are considered. They are satisfaction with influence over job; satisfaction with amount of pay; satisfaction with sense of achievement and satisfaction with respect from supervisors. Main findings indicate that management-employee relationships are less satisfactory in the large firms than in the small firms. Job satisfaction levels are lower in large firms. Less satisfactory management-employee relationships in the large firms may be a major source of the observed lower level of job satisfaction in them. These results have important policy implications from the point of view of the firm management while achieving the aims of their organizations in particular in the large firms in the area of management-employee relationships. Improving the management-employee relations in large firms will increase employee satisfaction in many respects as well as increase productivity and reduce turnover. The nature of the management-employee relations with firm size and job satisfaction has not been investigated before.
    Keywords: Job Satisfaction, Managerial Attitudes, Firm size, Linked Employer-Employee data, Britain.
    JEL: J28 J5 J21 D23
    Date: 2013–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:koc:wpaper:1307&r=hap

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