nep-hap New Economics Papers
on Economics of Happiness
Issue of 2010‒12‒23
two papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo
University of Milano-Bicocca

  1. Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis By Jenny Willson; Andy Dickerson
  2. Satisfaction with job and income among older individuals across European countries By Bonsang Eric; Soest Arthur van

  1. By: Jenny Willson; Andy Dickerson (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)
    Abstract: The relationship between part time employment and job satisfaction is analysed for mothers in Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland, France, Spain and the UK. The impact of working part time on subjective life satisfaction and mental well-being is additionally analysed for British mothers. Cultural traditions concerning women’s role in society, and institutional differences between the countries are exploited. Results indicate that poor quality jobs can diminish any positive well-being repercussions of part time employment. The results additionally suggest that part time mothers in the UK experience higher levels of job satisfaction but not of overall life satisfaction as compared to their full time counterparts.
    Keywords: part time work, job satisfaction, well being
    JEL: J28 J16 J13 I31
    Date: 2010–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:shf:wpaper:2010021&r=hap
  2. By: Bonsang Eric; Soest Arthur van (ROA rm)
    Abstract: Using data on individuals of age 50 and older from 11 European countries, we analyzetwo economic aspects of subjective well-being of older Europeans: satisfaction withhousehold income, and job satisfaction. Both have been shown to contribute substantiallyto overall well-being (satisfaction with life or happiness). We use anchoring vignettes tocorrect for potential differences in response scales across countries.The results highlight a large variation in self-reported income satisfaction, which ispartly explained by differences in response scales. When differences in response scalesare eliminated, the cross country differences are quite well in line with differences inan objective measure of purchasing power of household income. There are commonfeatures in the response scale differences in job satisfaction and income satisfaction.French respondents tend to be critical in both assessments, while Danish and Dutchrespondents are always on the optimistic end of the spectrum. Moreover, correcting forresponse scale differences decreases the cross-country association between satisfactionwith income and job satisfaction among workers.
    Keywords: labour economics ;
    Date: 2010
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:dgr:umaror:2010011&r=hap

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