nep-fle New Economics Papers
on Financial Literacy and Education
Issue of 2023‒09‒11
four papers chosen by
Viviana Di Giovinazzo, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca


  1. Macro Dimensions of Financial Inclusion Index and its Status in Developing Countries By Shah, Shahid Manzoor; Ali, Amjad
  2. The behavioral finance of MSMEs in the advancement of financial inclusion and financial technology (fintech) By Risman, Asep; Ali, Anees Janee; Soelton, Mochamad; Siswanti, Indra
  3. Mobile money innovations, income inequality and gender inclusion in sub-Saharan Africa By Simplice A. Asongu; Peter Agyemang-Mintah; Joseph Nnanna; Yolande E. Ngoungou
  4. Fuel poverty and financial literacy: Evidence from Irish home owners By Reanos, Miguel Tovar; Curtis, John; Pillai, Arya; Meier, David

  1. By: Shah, Shahid Manzoor; Ali, Amjad
    Abstract: Promoting financial inclusion is the priority of every country’s policymaker and financial experts. So that, every individual as well as business can get equal and affordable financial services. Because financial inclusion deals with providing affordable as well as equal access to financial products and services to the masses of the country, especially to the financially deprived entrepreneur as well as businesses. The importance of financial inclusion is widely recognized but the literature lacks the efficient, comprehensive, and updated measurement of financial inclusion which can be used to judge the accurate level of financial inclusion. This study tries to fulfill this gap by constructing an updated and comprehensive index of financial inclusion for developing countries by using the updated data from 2005 to 2020. This updated data is collected from the world bank, the central banks of every country, and the finance divisions of every country. Furthermore, this study constructs a macro-level multidimensional index of financial inclusion by using socio-economic and financial dimensions. The value of the constructed index lies between 0 to 1. This study divides the score of financial inclusion into three categories 0 to 0.30 for low financial inclusion, 0.31 to 0.50 for medium financial inclusion, and 0.51 to 1 for high financial inclusion. The present index reveals that all developing countries have a medium and lower level of financial inclusion. Estonia is the only country that achieve higher financial inclusion in 2009-10. This proposed index gives the updated measurement of financial inclusion which is easy to compare among economies.
    Keywords: Financial Inclusion, Macro Dimension, Socio-Economic, Financial inclusion index
    JEL: G2 O1
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:118036&r=fle
  2. By: Risman, Asep; Ali, Anees Janee; Soelton, Mochamad; Siswanti, Indra
    Abstract: This study aims to determine empirical evidence of the effect of financial inclusion and financial technology (fintech) on the behavioral finance of MSMEs. This study uses a quantitative method with a positivist paradigm approach. The population of this study is all MSMEs in Indonesia. The sample used in this study is 205 respondents (MSME owners) from all over Indonesia. Sampling is carried out using a random technique. Data collection is carried out by distributing questionnaires, both manually and online using Google Forms, and is measured using a 5-point Likert scale. The data processing is carried out using Partial Least Square (PLS) software with a Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) model. The results of this study show that financial inclusion and financial technology (fintech) have a direct positive effect on the behavioral finance of MSMEs. Financial technology (fintech) can mediate and increase the effect of financial inclusion on the behavioral finance of MSMEs.
    Keywords: Financial Inclusion, Financial Technology, Behavioral Finance of MSMEs
    JEL: G02
    Date: 2022–08–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:118212&r=fle
  3. By: Simplice A. Asongu (Yaoundé, Cameroon); Peter Agyemang-Mintah (Zayed University, Abu Dhabi, UAE); Joseph Nnanna (The Development Bank of Nigeria, Abuja, Nigeria); Yolande E. Ngoungou (Yaoundé, Cameroon)
    Abstract: The study assesses the role of mobile money innovations on income inequality and gender inclusion in 42 Sub-Saharan African countries for the period 1980 to 2019 using interactive quantile regressions. The following findings are established. First, income inequality unconditionally reduces the involvement of women in business and politics. Second, mobile money innovations interact with income inequality to have a positive impact on women in business and politics. Third, net effects from the role of mobile money innovations in income inequality for gender inclusion are consistently negative. Fourth, given that the positive conditional or interactive effects and negative net effects are consistent across the conditional distribution of gender inclusion, thresholds at which mobile money innovations can completely dampen the negative effect of income inequality on gender inclusion are provided. Among others, policy makers should work towards improving conditions for mobile money innovations. They should also be aware that reducing both income inequality and enhancing mobile money innovations simultaneously leads to more inclusive outcomes in terms of gender inclusion.
    Keywords: Financial inclusion; inequality; mobile phones; sub-Saharan Africa; women
    JEL: G20 O40 I10 I20 I32
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:exs:wpaper:23/047&r=fle
  4. By: Reanos, Miguel Tovar; Curtis, John; Pillai, Arya; Meier, David
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp751&r=fle

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