nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2023‒10‒09
twenty-one papers chosen by
Angelo Zago, Università degli Studi di Verona


  1. Potential impacts of the Income Stabilisation Tool on farmers' income and crop diversity: a French case study By Kamel Louhichi; Daël Merisier
  2. Business strategy pathways for short food supply chains: sharing value between consumers and producers By F. Cirone; M. Masotti; P. Prosperi; S. Bosi; G. Dinelli; M. Vittuari
  3. Subjective barriers and determinants to crop insurance adoption. By Richard KOENIG; Marielle BRUNETTE
  4. Determinants of Agricultural Fires: An Aggregative Games Approach By Wilfredo L. Maldonado; Jessica A. Barbosa
  5. Projections of Economic Impacts of Climate Change on Marine Protected Areas: Palau, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Bering Sea By Talya ten Brink
  6. New circular business models for urban solid biowaste valorisation By Valentin Savary; Sandrine Costa; Mechthild Donner; Christian Duquennoi
  7. Emerging collaborative circular bioeconomy business models in France By Mechthild Donner; Hugo de Vries
  8. Lighting the path forward? The impact of rural road construction on structural transformation in India: new evidence from the PMGSY Scheme and two complementary natural experiments By Thomas Kurian
  9. India's rice export restrictions and BIMSTEC countries: Implications and recommendations By Kamar, Abul; Roy, Devesh; Pradhan, Mamata; Saroj, Sunil
  10. Feeder Cattle Genomic Tests: Analyzing Cattle Producer Adoption Decisions By Griffith, Andrew P.; DeLong, Karen L.; Jensen, Kim L.; Boyer, Chris N.; Martinez, Charley
  11. Maintaining human wellbeing as socio-environmental systems undergo regime shifts By Andrew R. Tilman; Elisabeth H. Krueger; Lisa C. McManus; James R. Watson
  12. Tropical blue carbon: solutions and perspectives for valuations of carbon sequestration By Nathalie Hilmi; Maria Belen Benitez Carranco; David Broussard; Maryann Mathew; Salpie Djoundourian; Sandra Cassotta; Alain Safa; Samir Maliki; Florence Descroix-Comanducci; Denis Allemand; Claude Berthomieu; Jason Hall-Spencer; Christine Ferrier-Pagès
  13. Tennessee and Texas Cow-Calf Producers' Perception of Livestock Pests By Luo, Lun; DeLong, Karen; Griffith, Andrew P.; Schexnayder, Susan; Fryxell, Rebecca Trout
  14. Reaching Those in Need: Estimates of State Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participation Rates in 2020 By Cunnyngham, Karen
  15. Reformulating Index Insurance to Protect Women’s Assets and Well-being: Evidence from Pastoralist Communities in Kenya By Julian Arteaga; Michael Carter; Andrew Hobbs
  16. Institutional structure of the agricultural utilization of sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Bulgaria By Bachev, Hrabrin
  17. Agriculture Credit and Economic Growth in Bangladesh: A Time Series Analysis By Md. Toaha; Laboni Mondal
  18. A Wind Tunnel Test of Wind Farm Auctions By Xinyu Li; Marco Haan; Sander Onderstal; Jasper Veldman
  19. Le projet NOBEL pour l’amélioration et le maintien des services écosystémiques des forêts By Jens Abildtrup; Anne Stenger-Letheux
  20. The crofter is a woman: Gender division of labour in rural semi-landless households, Sweden 1800-1900 By Uppenberg, Carolina; Nilsson, Malin
  21. Risk aversion in renewable resource harvesting By Claudia Kelsall; Martin F Quaas; Nicolas Quérou

  1. By: Kamel Louhichi; Daël Merisier (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: This paper analyses the potential impacts of a hypothetical implementation of the Income Stabilisation Tool in France for the field crops sector. The IST is a risk management tool proposed within the CAP 2014-2020 to support farmers facing a severe drop in their incomes. This analysis was conducted using a farm-level model relying on expected utility theory and based on positive mathematical programming with risk. The model was applied to a sample of 1375 field crop farms in metropolitan France derived from FADN data. Simulation results show that the uptake rate of the tool is relatively low, less than 37% in all scenarios. It strongly depends on the CAP public support, the loss threshold triggering entitlement to the aid and the amount of premium paid by farmers. The highest rates are observed in large farms and farms located in regions highly exposed to climatic risks. Model results also show that the IST boost adopters' income. However, its impacts on crop diversity, measured by Shannon index, are negatives.
    Keywords: Agricultural risk management, Income Stabilisation Tool, Mutual Fund, Crop diversity, Farm-level Model, Common Agricultural Policy, France
    Date: 2023–08–29
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04195630&r=agr
  2. By: F. Cirone (Université de Bologne); M. Masotti (Université de Bologne); P. Prosperi (CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes, UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); S. Bosi (Université de Bologne); G. Dinelli (Université de Bologne); M. Vittuari (Université de Bologne)
    Abstract: Short food supply chains play a vital role in connecting local producers with consumers, promoting sustainability, supporting local economies, and providing access to fresh, high-quality products. However, their market is still underdeveloped due to the mismatching between consumer demand and producer supply. The aim of this work is to identify a common vision between producers and consumers in short food supply chains proposing key actions for an effective business strategy to improve alternative food systems at a territorial level. The strategic long-term vision to foster short food supply chains is based on a direct farmer-to-retailer model. Grounded on the case of an ancient grains supply chain located in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, this research relies on a mixed-method approach including quantitative and qualitative methodologies. A household survey conducted with a representative sample of 1122 Italian households allowed to identify four consumer profiles. Then, two focus groups conducted with 10 food supply chain stakeholders led to the identification of six thematic areas of action. By the backcasting methodology, ancient grains supply chain actors proposed a set of business actions to reach consumers' preferences. Finally, a two rounds Delphi conducted with 23 food supply chain experts allowed to validate the results and the 18 actions to be adopted from 2023 to 2030 for the business strategy pathway. The business strategy pathway can increase the local market presence of ancient grain products, helping producers to plan future business activities and disclose changes in consumer preferences or market conditions.
    Keywords: SUPPLY CHAIN, PRODUCER CONSUMER RELATIONS, COMPANY STRATEGY, MARKETING TECHNIQUES, SUSTAINABLE FOOD, SHORT SUPPLY CHAIN, PROXIMITY, VALUE, CEREALS, EMILIA ROMAGNA, ITALY, CHAINE D'APPROVISIONNEMENT, RELATION PRODUCTEUR CONSOMMATEUR, STRATEGIE DE L'ENTREPRISE, TECHNIQUE DE VENTE, ALIMENTATION DURABLE, CIRCUIT COURT, PROXIMITE, VALEUR, CEREALE, ITALIE
    Date: 2023–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04186888&r=agr
  3. By: Richard KOENIG; Marielle BRUNETTE
    Abstract: Crop insurance has a low rate of diffusion among French farmers. In this context, the objective of the article is to identify determinants and barriers to crop insurance from the point of view of the farmers. We designed an original survey using different methodologies (questions, experimental tests, self-ranking, Likert scales, etc.). We carried out cross-sectional and dynamic probit regressions on crop insurance adoption. We show that the characteristics of the farm (e.g., surface area, certification, diversification) and the farmers (e.g., marital and tenure status) as well as behavioral variables (e.g., time preferences) have an impact on the adoption of crop insurance. In addition, we show that the characteristics of the contract play an important role in the decision to subscribe or not since the farmers who are not insured consider the premium and deductible level to be the main barriers, whereas the farmers who adopt crop insurance report recent loss and expect poor weather conditions for the incoming season. We discuss the results with regard to the current crop insurance reform in France.
    Keywords: Crop insurance, Farmers, Determinants, Barriers, Survey, France.
    JEL: Q12 G22
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2023-25&r=agr
  4. By: Wilfredo L. Maldonado; Jessica A. Barbosa
    Abstract: The effects of deforestation through land fires used by farmers (specially, smallholders) are twofold. From the individual point of view, they prepare the land improving its fertility. On the other side, the aggregate decision has a negative impact on air and water quality, degrading the environment, and this is reverted as a negative impact of the productivity of the land. In this work we present an aggregative game framework which includes those effects and allows us to analyze the impact of cost fires variations and number of farmers. Finally, using data from Brazilian research institutes, we test the sign and the size of the impacts of those determinants on the aggregate deforestation in Brazil for the period 2009 to 2018.
    Keywords: Aggregative games; land use; deforestation
    JEL: C72 D62 Q5
    Date: 2023–09–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:spa:wpaper:2023wpecon12&r=agr
  5. By: Talya ten Brink
    Abstract: Climate change substantially impacts ecological systems. Marine species are shifting their distribution because of climate change towards colder waters, potentially compromising the benefits of currently established Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Therefore, we demonstrate how three case study regions will be impacted by warming ocean waters to prepare stakeholders to understand how the fisheries around the MPAs is predicted to change. We chose the case studies to focus on large scale MPAs in i) a cold, polar region, ii) a tropical region near the equator, and iii) a tropical region farther from the equator. We quantify the biological impacts of shifts in species distribution due to climate change for fishing communities that depend on the Palau National Marine Sanctuary, the Great Barrier Reef Marine National Park Zone, and the North Bering Sea Research Area MPAs. We find that fisheries sectors will be impacted differently in different regions and show that all three regions can be supported by this methodology for decision making that joins sector income and species diversity.
    Date: 2023–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2309.02323&r=agr
  6. By: Valentin Savary (INSA - Institut National des Sciences Appliquées); Sandrine Costa (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Mechthild Donner (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Christian Duquennoi (UR PROSE - Procédés biotechnologiques au service de l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Keywords: circular economy, business models, urban solid biowaste, micro-scale
    Date: 2023–06–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04186281&r=agr
  7. By: Mechthild Donner (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Hugo de Vries (UMR IATE - Ingénierie des Agro-polymères et Technologies Émergentes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Keywords: circular economy, bioeconomy, business models, agrifood sector, France
    Date: 2023–06–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04186237&r=agr
  8. By: Thomas Kurian
    Abstract: 1 billion people worldwide live over 2 km from a paved road. Consequently, I investi-gate medium-run impacts of rural road construction on structural transformation in India- identifying how responsive such benefits are based on a) external market condi¬tions and b) in-village electrification. I leverage a regression discontinuity design and triple difference strategy, exploiting discontinuities in population-based eligibility and staggered rollout of the Indian PMGSY rural road program- which aimed to provided all-weather road (AWR) connectivity to 115, 000 villages nationwide. I combine the program with a unique natural experiment induced by the US fracking boom, which created a parallel agricultural commodity boom in the price of guar, a crop provid¬ing a necessary fracking input. I compare heterogeneous impacts of AWRs in villages with high and low-intensity exposure to the fracking boom, and separately investigate heterogeneity of roads by village electrification access, exploiting variable implemen-tation intensity of the nationwide RGGVY electrification program. My results im¬ply structural transformation benefits of AWRs are relatively unresponsive to village electrification, whereas external economic conditions can drastically influence these impacts. RD analysis showcases labor reallocation gains from AWRs were entirely concentrated in non-Boom villages- where roads caused a 12.1-7 percentage-point reduction in share of workers employed in agriculture, and 9.2-8 percentage-point in-creased share employed in non-agricultural manual labour. Conversely, AWRs caused significantly reduced (net zero) structural transformation benefits in boom villages. My findings are robust to multiple specification tests, varying electrification levels, and suggest substantial within-village heterogeneity, with largest discrepancies in new labor market entrants. A plausible mechanism is reduced out-migration impacts of AWRs in boom-villages. These results confirm theoretical predictions that local eco¬nomic conditions can drastically influence the impact of infrastructure investments suggesting the need for effective spatial and temporal targeting.
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:csa:wpaper:2023-03&r=agr
  9. By: Kamar, Abul; Roy, Devesh; Pradhan, Mamata; Saroj, Sunil
    Abstract: The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) brings together five South Asian countries (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka) and two Southeast Asian countries (Myanmar and Thailand). Recent events have raised global concerns on food security, including for BIMSTEC countries; these events include Russia’s withdrawal from the Black Sea Grain Initiative with Ukraine, India’s prohibition on the export of non-basmati white rice, and its 20 percent export duty on parboiled rice. This policy note spells out the likely impact of one of these events, that is, India’s restrictions on rice exports to its fellow BIMSTEC nations. Trade moves food from surplus to deficit regions and hence is crucial for maintaining a stable food supply. Historically, the global supply of cereals has been stable (Bradford et al. 2022); this implies that trade (or the lack of it) can be directly mapped onto area-specific food insecurity. At the same time, shocks leading to trade disruption can pose serious challenges, particularly for countries with high import penetration in food.
    Keywords: INDIA; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA; BANGLADESH; BHUTAN; INDIA; NEPAL; SRI LANKA; trade; food security; exports; rice; cereals; shocks; imports; trade barriers; Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC)
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:prnote:136875&r=agr
  10. By: Griffith, Andrew P.; DeLong, Karen L.; Jensen, Kim L.; Boyer, Chris N.; Martinez, Charley
    Abstract: Feeder cattle genomic tests (GTs) are a tool producers can use when making feeder cattle marketing and heifer retention decisions based on the expected performance of cattle in the feedlot or as replacement females. For example, Neogen’s Igenity Feeder Cattle Test estimates growth and carcass characteristics of cattle through its Igenity Terminal Index (ITI) (Neogen 2022). The index is calculated using the predicted genetic values of hot carcass weight, ribeye area, marbling, tenderness, fat thickness, residual feed intake and calving ease direct. Similarly, Zoetis offers the Inherit Select Heifer Selection Tool (Zoetis 2022), which provides genomic expected progeny differences (EPDs) for 18 traits and five economic indexes. Cattle producers have used expected progeny differences (EPDs) for years as part of their sire selection criteria. Following recent developments in high-density genotyping technologies, many producers have instituted the use of genomic enhanced EPDs in sire selection, especially for unproven sires with few or no offspring. Alternatively, it appears there has been limited commercial use of GTs for feeder cattle and replacement heifers and even less research evaluating their use. A few studies have estimated the value of certain genetic markers or characteristics to market feeder and feedlot cattle, but the cost of the test was found to be greater than the estimated benefits (DeVuyst, et al. 2007; Lusk 2007; Thompson, et al. 2016). Alternatively, Thompson et al. (2017) found genetic testing a sample of cattle resulted in GTs benefits exceeding the cost of the test. Furthermore, the cost of GTs has declined (Neogen 2020). Thus, there is reason to evaluate GT benefits given the lower cost of using them. The goal of this publication is to report on research findings concerning Tennessee cattle producer preferences for GTs. Specifically, the following were evaluated (1) feeder cattle and replacement heifer producers’ interest in using GTs, (2) producer willingness to pay (WTP) for these tests, (3) the percentage of cattle they would test and (4) how producer and farm characteris- tics affect producers’ GTs adoption decisions when marketing feeder cattle and selecting replacement heifers.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Marketing, Production Economics
    Date: 2023–09–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:utaeer:338376&r=agr
  11. By: Andrew R. Tilman; Elisabeth H. Krueger; Lisa C. McManus; James R. Watson
    Abstract: Global environmental change is pushing many socio-environmental systems towards critical thresholds, where ecological systems' states are on the precipice of tipping points and interventions are needed to navigate or avert impending transitions. Flickering, where a system vacillates between alternative stable states, is touted as a useful early warning signal of irreversible transitions to undesirable ecological regimes. However, while flickering may presage an ecological tipping point, these dynamics also pose unique challenges for human adaptation. In this work, we link an ecological model that can exhibit flickering to a model of human adaptation to a changing environment. This allows us to explore the impact of flickering on the utility of adaptive agents in a coupled socio-environmental system. We highlight the conditions under which flickering causes wellbeing to decline disproportionately, and explore how these dynamics impact the optimal timing of a transformational change that partially decouples wellbeing from environmental variability. The implications of flickering on nomadic communities in Mongolia, artisanal fisheries, and wildfire systems are explored as possible case studies. Flickering, driven in part by climate change and changes to governance systems, may already be impacting communities. We argue that governance interventions investing in adaptive capacity could blunt the negative impact of flickering that can occur as socio-environmental systems pass through tipping points, and therefore contribute to the sustainability of these systems.
    Date: 2023–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2309.04578&r=agr
  12. By: Nathalie Hilmi; Maria Belen Benitez Carranco; David Broussard; Maryann Mathew; Salpie Djoundourian; Sandra Cassotta; Alain Safa (GRM - Groupe de Recherche en Management - EA 4711 - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis (1965 - 2019) - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur); Samir Maliki; Florence Descroix-Comanducci; Denis Allemand; Claude Berthomieu; Jason Hall-Spencer; Christine Ferrier-Pagès
    Abstract: Tropical marine ecosystems provide a wide range of provisioning, regulating, supporting and cultural services to millions of people. They also largely contribute to blue carbon sequestration. Mangroves, seaweeds, and seagrass habitats are important because they store large amounts of organic carbon while fish play a fundamental role in the carbon transport to deep waters. Protecting and restoring tropical marine ecosystems is of great value to society because their decline impairs the vital services they provide, such as coastal protection and seafood supplies. In this marine policy paper, we present options for enhancing blue carbon sequestration in tropical coastal areas. In addition, we outline the economic value of four components of coastal ecosystems (mangroves, seagrass beds, seaweed forests and fish) and discuss the economic levers society can apply to ensure the end of the current gross mismanagement of tropical blue carbon ecosystems. Market-based solutions, such as carbon taxes or fines for violations that use the ‘polluter pays' principle, can be very effective in achieving national or international climate agreements. Private investment can also finance the preservation of blue carbon ecosystems. One widely known financing method for blue carbon conservation, particularly of mangroves, is the use of municipal bonds, which can be issued like traditional bonds to finance the day-to-day obligations of cities, states and counties. Non-philanthropic investments can also be used in order to protect these ecosystems, such as debt-for-nature swaps and the improved application of regulatory frameworks. Overall, the protection of tropical marine ecosystems is an ecological imperative and should also be seen as an opportunity for new revenue streams and debt reduction for countries worldwide.
    Keywords: tropical blue carbon ecosystem services conservation restoration market-based solutions, tropical blue carbon, ecosystem services, conservation, restoration, market-based solutions
    Date: 2023–06–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04191177&r=agr
  13. By: Luo, Lun; DeLong, Karen; Griffith, Andrew P.; Schexnayder, Susan; Fryxell, Rebecca Trout
    Abstract: Cattle producers deal with many pests affecting their cattle that negatively affect their herds and impose a variety of damages (Smith et al. 2022a; Brewer et al. 2021). Brewer et al. (2021) state that within the United States, the economic loss associated with horn flies alone is more than $2.3 billion annually. Pests of livestock can cause direct damage to animals by being a nuisance or directly blood feeding on animals. Indirectly, these pests can transmit pathogens, and some pests can cause peripheral damage via misuse of management decisions or quarantines. The most common pests of pastured cattle are lice, ticks, and flies; including horn flies (Haematobia irritans (L.)), face flies (Musca autumnalis De Geer), stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)), house flies (Musca domestica (L.)) and cattle grubs/heel flies (Hypoderma bovis (L.) or H. lineatum (Villers)) (Williams 2009). Horn flies and stable flies will blood feed on animals, which annoys, alters grazing habits, decreases milk production and weight gains in pastured cattle and allows for transmission of pathogens causing mastitis (recently reviewed by Brewer et al. 2021, Rochon et al. 2021). House and face flies are nuisance flies that feed on host exudates, and, when bacteria are present, these flies can also transmit bacteria causing pink eye or other infectious diseases (Geden et al. 2021, Trout Fryxell et al. 2021). Many producers will use insect growth regulators to control nematodes, but non-target control of lice, cattle grubs and heel flies occurs with those products, leaving many researchers to wonder if these non-target pests are a problem for the industry (e.g., developed resistance, pest in organic operations) (Lysyk and Colwell 1996). Ticks not only blood feed on animals, but can cause anemia from feeding in high numbers, inject a toxin causing tick paralysis and transmit pathogens causing disease (Hooker et al. 1912). While all these different pests can be found in the same cattle operation, management for these pests are dependent on insecticides that often target all the pest species; notably, this is not a sustainable method and will lead to insecticide resistance. While we know producers are managing livestock pests (Smith et al. 2022b), we are not sure which pests they consider most important. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the perceived impact of different livestock pests, specifically arthropods, on cattle operations. We investigated this question to document the perceptions of cow-calf producers in two different regions of the United States (Tennessee and Texas).
    Keywords: Farm Management, Production Economics
    Date: 2023–09–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:utaeer:338375&r=agr
  14. By: Cunnyngham, Karen
    Abstract: Excerpts from the report: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to eligible, low-income individuals and households in need. SNAP is the largest of the domestic nutrition assistance programs administered by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The SNAP participation rate is the percentage of eligible people in the United States who actually participate in the program. State SNAP participation rate estimates can be used to assess recent program performance and focus efforts to improve access. This research brief presents estimates of State SNAP participation rates for fiscal year 2020.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2023–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:338582&r=agr
  15. By: Julian Arteaga; Michael Carter; Andrew Hobbs
    Abstract: The novel insurance contracts for crop losses and livestock mortality that have been developed in low income countries typically protect against shocks in the male sphere of economic activity. Often overlooked are women, the particularities of their indirect exposure to this risk, and their socially constructed responsibility to manage family well-being. To fill this lacuna, this paper studies the effect of a low-cost intervention that reformulates a livestock insurance contract so that it directly addresses women's risk and is sold in units that are commensurate with women's expenditure responsibilities. We measure the effect of this contractual reformulation using a randomized trial amongst pastoralist communities in Kenya. Twenty-four percent of previously subsidized households that received the novel contractual formulation purchased insurance (without subsidy), compared to only 13% of previously subsidized households offered insurance under the standard male-risk formulation. Households that had not received prior insurance subsidies purchased no insurance, irrespective of the framing. Protecting women, their assets and those who depend on them will require a combination of smart subsidies and gender-intentional insurance contract design.
    JEL: G52 O12 O13
    Date: 2023–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:31639&r=agr
  16. By: Bachev, Hrabrin
    Abstract: The process of turning wastewater treatment plant sludge from "waste into good (product)" is conditioned by various social, economic, technological, agronomic, personal, etc. factors, an important place among them is occupied by the institutional structure in which the related agents carry out their activities and relationships. Institutional Environment and Institutions of Governance provide opportunities and set constraints for agents in the chain, structure and determine their behavior and activity, and ultimately (pre)determine the effectiveness and the degree of use of sludge in agriculture. In this study, the interdisciplinary methodology of the New Institutional Economics is adopted and an analysis and assessment of the institutional structure of WTP sludge utilization in Bulgarian agriculture is made. The study found that over the last two decades, the institutional structure (regulatory framework, public, private, market and hybrid forms) of sludge utilization in Bulgarian agriculture has significantly improved. As a result, great progress has been observed in the agricultural use of sludge in the country. At the same time, uneven and unsustainable development of this process was found in the different regions of the country. Therefore, all factors limiting the behavior of the associated agents and leading to these fluctuations in sludge utilization are to be identified. In view of their relevance, interdisciplinary studies and evaluations of the institutional structure and factors of sludge utilization in agriculture have to be expanded and enriched. However, for this, it is necessary to collect a new type of micro and macro information from all interested parties, including through the official system of agro-statistics in the country and the EU. In view of the leading role of public intervention in this area, a new national strategy for the utilization of WTP sludge is to be developed, reflecting modern conditions and social priorities, and special measures be taken to support the interested parties, including farmers with tools of CAP. Trends in the development of the institutional structure and the utilization of sludge in other EU countries must also be studied to assess where Bulgaria is and where efforts are to be focused in the future.
    Keywords: sludge, wastewater treatment plants, utilization, agriculture, institutional environment, institutions of governance, Bulgaria
    JEL: Q12 Q13 Q15 Q16 Q18 Q2 Q4 Q5 R0
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:118416&r=agr
  17. By: Md. Toaha; Laboni Mondal
    Abstract: The paper examined the impact of agricultural credit on economic growth in Bangladesh. The annual data of agriculture credit were collected from annual reports of the Bangladesh Bank and other data were collected from the world development indicator (WDI) of the World Bank. By employing Johansen cointegration test and vector error correction model (VECM), the study revealed that there exists a long run relationship between the variables. The results of the study showed that agriculture credit had a positive impact on GDP growth in Bangladesh. The study also found that gross capital formation had a positive, while inflation had a negative association with economic growth in Bangladesh. Therefore, the government and policymakers should continue their effort to increase the volume of agriculture credit to achieve sustainable economic growth.
    Date: 2023–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2309.04118&r=agr
  18. By: Xinyu Li (PBL Netherlands); Marco Haan (University of Amsterdam); Sander Onderstal (University of Groningen); Jasper Veldman (University of Amsterdam)
    Abstract: Globally, governments increasingly rely on auctions to advance renewable energy. This paper studies the design of wind farm auctions and evaluates the impact of price guarantees and subsidies on auction efficiency, government revenue, and renewable-energy production. While the theoretical analysis suggests that the price guarantee has no effect, our laboratory experiment suggests that the price guarantee improves efficiency and that it often increases production and revenue. An important explanation for these results is that less risk averse subjects tend to bid less aggressively and produce less. Without the price guarantee, and hence with more uncertainty in the auction, this increases the chances that risk-loving bidders win the auction, thus compromising auction efficiency. The subsidy is less effective than suggested by theory. Bidders with a higher valuation tend to bid more conservatively than the equilibrium prediction, thus neutralizing the efficiency-enhancing effect of the subsidy.
    Keywords: Auctions, Experiments, Wind farms, Renewable energy
    JEL: C92 D44 F64 H23 Q58
    Date: 2023–08–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tin:wpaper:20230046&r=agr
  19. By: Jens Abildtrup (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - AgroParisTech - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) Mulhouse - Colmar - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Anne Stenger-Letheux (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - AgroParisTech - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) Mulhouse - Colmar - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Il est largement reconnu que les espaces forestiers produisent de nombreux biens et services comme le bois, le stockage du carbone, la conservation de la biodiversité, la protection des sols ou de l'eau… Mais la production de bois reste la seule activité rémunératrice, alors que les autres services sont implicitement offerts à la société. L'objectif principal du projet NOBEL a été de réfléchir aux possibilités d'amélioration, de maintien et de rémunérations des services écosystémiques.
    Keywords: Service ecosystemique, PSE, Foret, Enquête
    Date: 2023–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04183989&r=agr
  20. By: Uppenberg, Carolina (Department of Economic History and International Relations, Stockholm University); Nilsson, Malin (Department of Economic History, Lund University)
    Abstract: The aim of this paper is to contribute to the empirical question of the labour organisation and the gender division of labour in a semi-landless rural group, crofters (Swedish torpare), during the nineteenth century, and thereby also add to the larger question of the role of gender division of labour in the formation of a wagedependent class. The crofters’ households performed contract-defined corvée labour (unpaid duties as payment for the croft) for the landowner alongside subsistence work at their own croft. We triangulated crofters’ contracts, work lists from estate archives and ethnographic questionnaires to understand the gender division of labour on the estates and at the crofts. The results show that men performed a much higher number of corvée days per year compared to women. We found a positive correlation between men’s and women’s corvee days, meaning that crofts with the highest number of corvée days for men also had the highest number for women. Moreover, we found that many core agricultural tasks were done by both men and women. The labour organisation, on the other hand, was clearly gendered – the role as a crofter in the sense of doing corvée labour for a landowner was primarily a male experience, while the role as a crofter in the sense of working one’s own small plot of land was a female experience.
    Keywords: gender division of labour; proletarianization; semi-landless households; crofters; torpare; estates; Sweden; nineteenth century
    JEL: N53
    Date: 2023–09–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:luekhi:0253&r=agr
  21. By: Claudia Kelsall (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Martin F Quaas (CAU - Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel); Nicolas Quérou (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: We study optimal harvesting of a renewable resource with stochastic dynamics. To focus on the effect of risk aversion, we consider a resource user who is indifferent with respect to intertemporal variability. In this setting, a constant escapement strategy is optimal, i.e. the stock after optimal harvesting is constant. We find that under common specifications of risk aversion, increasing risk and risk aversion increase current resource use. We show that this is due to an investment effect, i.e. the resource user invests in risk free alternatives, rather than the risky resource stock. A quantitative application of the model for the Eastern Baltic cod fishery shows that risk and risk aversion can have a much larger effect on optimal harvesting than found in the previous literature. ✩ We thank Mickael Beaud, Mabel Tidball, Rudi Voss, Marc Willinger, the editor and two referees for helpful comments and suggestions. The authors acknowledge the ANR-DFG project CRaMoRes (Grant ANR-19-FRAL-0010-01 and DFG QU 357/14-1). C. Kelsall acknowledges the support of labEx CeMEB, an ANR ''Investissements d'avenir'' program (ANR-10-LABX-04-01). M. Quaas acknowledges funding by BMBF under grant 03F0876B.
    Keywords: Resource economics Investment under uncertainty Risk aversion Prudence Precautionary savings
    Date: 2023–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04190160&r=agr

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