nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2023‒08‒28
forty-two papers chosen by
Angelo Zago, Università degli Studi di Verona


  1. Crop improvements for future‐proofing European food systems: A focus‐group‐driven analysis of agricultural production stakeholder priorities and viewpoints By Stacia Stetkiewicz; Jonathan Menary; Abhishek Nair; Mariana Rufino; Arnout R.H. Fischer; Marc Cornelissen; Remi Duchesne; Adrien Guichaoua; Petra Jorasch; Stephane Lemarié; Amrit Nanda; Ralf Wilhelm; Jessica A.C. Davies
  2. Environmental performance of mixed animal and plant protein sources for designing new fermented foods By Juliette Huguet; Christophe Chassard; René Lavigne; Françoise Irlinger; Isabelle Souchon; Stephan Marette; Anne Saint-Eve; Caroline Pénicaud
  3. Measuring changes in Bangladesh’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  4. Measuring changes in the Honduras’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  5. Measuring changes in the Uganda’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  6. Measuring changes in the Ghana’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  7. Measuring changes in the Mali’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  8. Assessing the role of small farmers and households in agriculture and the rural economy and measures to support their sustainable development By Oleg Nivievskyi; Pavlo Iavorskyi; Oleksandr Donchenko
  9. Measuring changes in the Rwanda’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  10. Measuring changes in the Niger’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  11. Measuring changes in the Kenya’s agri-food system By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  12. The Food and Nutrition Assistance Landscape: Fiscal Year 2022 Annual Report By Toossi, Saied; Jones, Jordan W.
  13. Determinants of Farmers’ Participation in the Production Insurance System By Rawa, Grzegorz
  14. Interdisciplinary modeling and participatory simulation of forest management to foster adaptation to climate change By Timothée Fouqueray; Julie Latune; Michel Trommetter; Nathalie Frascaria-Lacoste
  15. Concentration and Competition in U.S. Agribusiness By MacDonald, James M.; Dong, Xiao; Fuglie, Keith O.
  16. Why did agriculture’s share of Australian GDP not decline for a century? By Kym Anderson
  17. Crowding-in or crowding-out: The effect of humanitarian aid on households’ investments in climate adaptation By Fluhrer, Svenja
  18. Social Learning for the Green Transition Evidence from a Pesticide Reduction Policy By Rose Deperrois; Adélaïde Fadhuile; Julie Subervie
  19. How big is the “lemons” problem? Historical evidence from French wines By Pierre Mérel; Ariel Ortiz-Bobea; Emmanuel Paroissien
  20. The role of communities in vegetarian and vegan identity construction By Lucie Sirieix; Gilles Séré de Lanauze; Margot Dyen; Laurie Balbo; Erick Suarez
  21. Mastery Is Associated With Weight Status, Food Intake, Snacking, and Eating Disorder Symptoms in the NutriNet-Santé Cohort Study By Ulrike Gisch; Margaux Robert; Noémi Berlin; Antoine Nebout; Fabrice Etilé; Sabrina Teyssier; Valentina Andreeva; Serge Hercberg; Mathilde Touvier; Sandrine Péneau
  22. Dignity in Food Aid Logistics Is Also a Knowledge Management and Digital Matter: Three Inspiring Initiatives in France By Pierre-Emmanuel Arduin; Doudja Saïdi Kabeche
  23. Multiscale water accounting under climate change in a transboundary West African basin [Abstract only]. By Dembele, Moctar; Salvadore, E.; Zwart, Sander; Ceperley, N.; Mariethoz, G.; Schaefli, B.
  24. Synopsis: Prioritizing value chains for achieving Rwanda’s agrifood system transformation: A diagnostic of the agrifood system By Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia; Rosenbach, Gracie; Mugabo, Serge; Pauw, Karl; Spielman, David J.; Thurlow, James
  25. Forest Protection and Human Health: The Case of Malaria in the Brazilian Amazon By Karpavicius, Luiza; Chimeli, Ariaster
  26. Gender-Biased Technological Change: Milking Machines and the Exodus of Women from Farming By Ager, Philipp; Goñi, Marc; Salvanes, Kjell G.
  27. A Study on Participation of Farmers in Government e-Procurement of Paddy in West Bengal, India: Application of Double Hurdle Model By Jana, Sebak Kumar; Pal, Barun Deb; Manna, Siddhartha
  28. Dendrometric data from the silvicultural scenarios developed by Office National des Forêts (ONF) in France: a tool for applied research and carbon storage estimates By Salomé Fournier; Thierry Sardin; Philippe Dreyfus; Didier Francois; Xavier Mandret; Marion Simeoni; Jean-Pierre Renaud; Emila Akroume; Alain Bouvet; Alain Berthelot; Holger Wernsdörfer; Miguel Riviere; Julien Sainte-Marie; Sandrine Breteau-Amores; Christine Deleuze; François de Coligny
  29. Polish Finishers From Danish Piglets: Uncontrolled Transformation of Pig Industry in Poland By Olipra, Jakub
  30. Challenges of the Calamansi Industry in Oriental Mindoro, Philippines: Pests and Diseases Management By Masagca, Macario B. Jr.
  31. Temperature variability and long-run economic development By Linsenmeier, Manuel
  32. Conservation Priorities and Environmental Offsets: Markets for Florida Wetlands By Daniel Aronoff; Will Rafey
  33. Bangladesh’s agrifood system structure and drivers of transformation By Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Pradesha, Angga; Randriamamonjy, Josee; Thurlow, James
  34. Building an Inclusive Digital Society for Rural India By Mansi Kedia; Rajat Kathuria; Abhishek Raj; Richa Sekhani; Srishti Sinha
  35. Technological Transfer Channels of Food and Beverage Processing Multinationals to Host Countries: An Empirical Analysis By Rama, Ruth
  36. Burkina Faso’s agrifood system structure and drivers of transformation By Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josee; Thurlow, James; Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia
  37. Mozambique’s agrifood system structure and drivers of transformation By Benfica, Rui; Diao, Xinshen; Pauw, Karl; Thurlow, James; Ellis, Mia
  38. Climate Change and Adaptation in Global Supply-Chain Networks By Nora Pankratz; Christoph M. Schiller
  39. How research institutions can make the best of scandals – once they become unavoidable By Gilles Grolleau; Naoufel Mzoughi
  40. Land Use Efficiency Tool Improvements May Help Governments Meet Sustainability Targets Equitably By Nguyen, Peter; Barajas, Jesus M
  41. Risk sharing tests and covariate shocks By Ligon, Ethan
  42. Transformation of Sudan's agrifood system structure and drivers By Diao, Xinshen; Pauw, Karl; Raouf, Mariam; Siddig, Khalid; Thurlow, James; Ellis, Mia

  1. By: Stacia Stetkiewicz (Lancaster University, UON - University of Nottingham, UK); Jonathan Menary (Lancaster University, University of Oxford); Abhishek Nair (WUR - Wageningen University and Research [Wageningen]); Mariana Rufino (Lancaster University); Arnout R.H. Fischer (WUR - Wageningen University and Research [Wageningen]); Marc Cornelissen (BASF Innovat Ctr Gent, Ghent, Belgium); Remi Duchesne (Acta - Les instituts techniques agricoles); Adrien Guichaoua (Acta - Les instituts techniques agricoles); Petra Jorasch (Euroseeds, Brussels); Stephane Lemarié (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Amrit Nanda (Plants FutureEuropean Technol Platform, Brussels); Ralf Wilhelm (JKI - Julius Kühn-Institut); Jessica A.C. Davies (Lancaster University)
    Abstract: Crop breeding is one of the main tools which can assist in future-proofing food systems for more sustainable outcomes. In order to ensure priorities are aligned with the needs and wants of food system actors, it is essential to engage with key stakeholders to understand preferences on plant breeding solutions. This study presents results from a series of online focus groups conducted with agricultural production related stakeholders (i.e. farmers and farmer representatives, policymakers and NGOs) regarding the potential for crop improvement to future-proof European food systems. Stakeholders shared concern around climate change and environmental impacts (particularly drought and heat stress), and general agreement about the need to develop resilient crops which combine multiple positive attributes, while reducing trade-offs and negative externalities. Stakeholders also prioritized plant breeding solutions for areas where they felt they had little agency, and existing alternative solutions, such as improving input use efficiency, or altering diets to be considered where these are available. This highlights the need for the crop breeding community to focus its attentions on the 'most hard to fix' issues, where in-field measures are currently not offering viable solutions, to maximize acceptance and adoption by agricultural production stakeholders. It also highlights that consideration of trade-offs, within plant and within a broader agri-food context, must be integrated into crop breeding research and development, with trade-off analysis an explicit component of breeding research. Understanding broader agri-food system knock-on effects of plant innovation is a non-trivial challenge requiring interdisciplinary research and close partnerships with food system stakeholders.
    Keywords: Focus groups, Plant breeding, Stakeholder engagement, Sustainable food systems
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04047917&r=agr
  2. By: Juliette Huguet (SayFood - Paris-Saclay Food and Bioproduct Engineering - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Christophe Chassard (UMRF - Unité Mixte de Recherche sur le Fromage - VAS - VetAgro Sup - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche en alimentation, santé animale, sciences agronomiques et de l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UCA - Université Clermont Auvergne); René Lavigne (UMRF - Unité Mixte de Recherche sur le Fromage - VAS - VetAgro Sup - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche en alimentation, santé animale, sciences agronomiques et de l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UCA - Université Clermont Auvergne); Françoise Irlinger (SayFood - Paris-Saclay Food and Bioproduct Engineering - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Isabelle Souchon (SQPOV - Sécurité et Qualité des Produits d'Origine Végétale - AU - Avignon Université - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Stephan Marette (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Anne Saint-Eve (SayFood - Paris-Saclay Food and Bioproduct Engineering - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Caroline Pénicaud (SayFood - Paris-Saclay Food and Bioproduct Engineering - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: In the food industry, there is currently a great deal of interest in the development of plant-based alternatives to dairy products. However, little is known about the ways in which differences in formulation and/or processing affect the potential environmental benefits of such products. In this study, we investigated the environmental performance of four new fermented products created using different mixtures of plant- (pea) and animal- (cow milk) derived protein sources and prepared using a cheese-technology process (Camembert production). Life cycle assessments (LCAs) were performed that included all steps from the agricultural production of ingredients to the generation of the final ready-to-eat product. The goals were to identify the hotspots of this production system and to compare the different products to each other as well as to other common fermented or legume-based products (Camembert, tofu, hummus). The LCA results revealed that the two main hotspots for the mixed products were milk production (when used) and the ripening stage. All four products were similar with respect to the environmental impacts related to processing. Instead, with regard to the impacts of agricultural production, the products made with a higher proportion of pea protein were superior, providing clear evidence of the potential environmental benefit of pea-milk fermented foods. Overall, though, the mixed products did not present any environmental benefit compared to Camembert, hummus, and tofu due to the complex and energy-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. It is therefore critical that these processing steps be simplified and optimized in order to realize the environmental potential of such pea-based products.
    Keywords: Legumes, Dairy products, Life cycle assessment (LCA), Fermentation, Sustainable diets, Sustainable proteins
    Date: 2023–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04132788&r=agr
  3. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: BANGLADESH, SOUTH ASIA, ASIA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136655&r=agr
  4. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: HONDURAS, CENTRAL AMERICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136657&r=agr
  5. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: UGANDA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136674&r=agr
  6. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: GHANA, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136653&r=agr
  7. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: MALI, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136671&r=agr
  8. By: Oleg Nivievskyi; Pavlo Iavorskyi; Oleksandr Donchenko
    Abstract: The Ministry of Economy has an interest and demand in exploring how to increase the set of [legally registered] small family farmers in Ukraine and to examine more in details measures that could reduce the scale of the shadow agricultural market in Ukraine. Building upon the above political economy background and demand, we will be undertaking the analysis along the two separate but not totally independents streams of analysis, i.e. sustainable small scale (family) farming development and exploring the scale and measures for reducing the shadow agricultural market in Ukraine
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2307.11683&r=agr
  9. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: RWANDA, CENTRAL AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136672&r=agr
  10. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: NIGER, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136664&r=agr
  11. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Transformation of the agri-food system (AFS) is a leading pathway to achieve the USG Global Food Security Strategy Objective 1 of “Inclusive agriculture-led growth†. The AFS encompasses the primary agricultural sector, as well as all upstream and downstream agriculture-related activities. An expansion of the AFS’s off-farm components is central to the process of agricultural transformation and is strongly associated with economic development. The Percent change in value-added in the agri-food system (AgGDP+) and Employment in the agri-food system (AgEMP+) indicators are useful to track this process.
    Keywords: KENYA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, measurement, agrifood systems, food systems, agriculture, gross national product, off-farm employment, nonfarm income, economic sectors,
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:agdppb:136665&r=agr
  12. By: Toossi, Saied; Jones, Jordan W.
    Abstract: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers 15 domestic food and nutrition assistance programs that affect the lives of millions of people and account for roughly two-thirds of USDA’s annual budget. In response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, USDA launched additional temporary programs and implemented numerous policy changes that expanded the scope and coverage of existing programs. Together, these programs contributed to $183.0 billion in spending on food and nutrition assistance programs in fiscal year (FY) 2022 (October 1, 2021–September 30, 2022). This report uses preliminary data from USDA, Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to examine program trends and policy changes in USDA’s largest domestic food and nutrition assistance programs through FY 2022. It also summarizes a recent USDA, Economic Research Service (ERS) report examining the prevalence of household food insecurity in the United States in 2021 and another USDA, ERS report examining changes in food choices in the USDA Foods in Schools program.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Public Economics
    Date: 2023–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:337564&r=agr
  13. By: Rawa, Grzegorz
    Abstract: Progressive climate change triggers off phenomena that threaten agricultural production. Crop insurance makes it possible to mitigate their effects, but only a small percentage of crops in Poland is insured. Previous research into the determinants of farmers̕ participation in the production insurance system has mainly used the logit regression method. This paper presents the results of a study using a structural equation model (SEM) estimated for a sample of 600 farms in the FADN observation field, which aimed to identify factors influencing farmers’ purchase of production insurance. This research approach made it possible to describe the phenomenon in a way that has been little recognized so far, complementing the decision-making model under consideration with latent variables that could not be considered by the methods used so far. Based on the literature research, three unobservable variables were identified: willingness to purchase insurance, risk aversion and risk perception, and farming intensity, and then quantified using observable variables. The results show a directly proportional relationship between willingness to purchase insurance and risk aversion and risk perception and inversely proportional relationship with farming intensity.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2023–06–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:337447&r=agr
  14. By: Timothée Fouqueray (ESE - Ecologie Systématique et Evolution - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Julie Latune (ESE - Ecologie Systématique et Evolution - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Michel Trommetter (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Nathalie Frascaria-Lacoste (ESE - Ecologie Systématique et Evolution - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
    Abstract: The adaptive capacity of forests and foresters to overcome the adverse effects of climate change remains highly uncertain despite intense research efforts. While foresters are often invited "not to put all their eggs in one basket, " adaptation strategies to climate change mostly depend on silvicultural diversification. To explore how socioeconomic adaptive tools can complement these technical evolutions in forestry, we designed an interdisciplinary and participatory simulation of forest management combining a role-playing game, ecological models of forest evolution, and a severe climate change scenario. Participants from French natural parks and forest organizations responded positively to its multiple applications. Here, we investigate the technical and timber-focused framing of climate change by forest managers. We also analyze participants' negotiations when attempting to change the simulation rules of forest management. Drawing on this experience, we highlight how establishing a payment system for ecosystem services can reduce financial imbalance driven by climate change.
    Keywords: Participatory simulation, Interdisciplinary, Forest management, Adaptation, Climate change, Social-ecological
    Date: 2022–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03637823&r=agr
  15. By: MacDonald, James M.; Dong, Xiao; Fuglie, Keith O.
    Abstract: Market concentration, and its impact on competition, has attracted growing public scrutiny as well as several Federal policy initiatives. Critics argue that increased concentration has led to higher consumer prices, lower prices paid for farm commodities, increased corporate profits, reduced wages, less innovation, and waning productivity growth. The issues surrounding concentration extend to agribusiness, particularly to three agribusiness sectors where concentration has increased over time: seeds, meatpacking, and food retailing. This report details how consolidation proceeded in each sector—with attention to the important driving forces—and the effects on prices and innovation. Because mergers among firms have played a role in each sector’s consolidation, the report also describes Federal antitrust policy regarding mergers and its implementation in these sectors.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis, Industrial Organization, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2023–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uersib:337566&r=agr
  16. By: Kym Anderson
    Abstract: The agricultural sector’s share of GDP in growing economies typically declines but, for a century from the early 1850s, Australia’s did not. Drawing on recent structural transformation literature, this paper seeks explanations for this unusual phenomenon, which is all the more striking because agriculture’s share of employment continued to decline throughout and growth in manufacturing was being stimulated by tariff protection from imports. Several factors contributed, including a huge land frontier that took more than a century for settlers to explore, rapid declines in initially crippling domestic and ocean trade costs for farm products, the absence of a need to do any processing of the two main exports during that period (gold and wool), and innovations by farmers and via a strong public agricultural R&D system that contributed to farm labour productivity nearly doubling over those ten decades. The ban on iron ore exports from 1938 and low export prices for fuels, minerals and metals during the two world wars and in the intervening decades also contributed.
    Keywords: agricultural development, farm productivity growth, trade costs, mining booms, manufacturing protection
    JEL: F13 F63 N47 O13 Q17
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pas:papers:2023-09&r=agr
  17. By: Fluhrer, Svenja
    Abstract: Forecast-based Financing (FbF) is a new humanitarian instrument that helps vulnerable households to cope with climate shocks. While economists have posited that ex-post disaster aid decreases households’ investment in climate adaptation strategies such as agriculture insurance uptake, the effect of FbF on households’ adaptation investments is unknown. In this paper, I use a Randomized Controlled Trial approach to examine the effect of FbF on the demand for agriculture insurance among pastoralist households in Mongolia. I find that receiving FbF during an extreme weather event increases the uptake of livestock insurance for the following year, indicating that FbF crowds-in households’ investments in climate adaptation. I suggest increased risk awareness through which FbF affects insurance demand.
    Keywords: Adaptation, forecast-based financing, index-based agricultural insurance, livestock, charity hazard
    JEL: H84 O1 Q1
    Date: 2023–04–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:117975&r=agr
  18. By: Rose Deperrois (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier, GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Adélaïde Fadhuile (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Julie Subervie (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: Social learning and diffusion of innovations through peers can be a key component of the agroecological transition, as it contributes to the generalization of good practices and improves the efficiency of public policies by increasing the number of farmers reached without additional cost. We evaluated the spillover effects of a pesticide reduction scheme implemented in France during the 2010s, which was designed to train farmers in pesticide-saving farming practices and encourage knowledge diffusion beyond the scope of farms enrolled in the program. We applied a quasi-experimental approach to pseudo-panel data collected at national scale and found that doubling the proportion of participants would reduce pesticide use by about 10% within representative cohorts on average. Besides, we found an additional effect of similar magnitude on farms that report having participated to demonstration visits to the farms trained by the program. These results suggest that agricultural training programs are likely to generate spillover effects at lower cost.
    Date: 2023–07–23
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04168271&r=agr
  19. By: Pierre Mérel (UC Davis - University of California [Davis] - UC - University of California); Ariel Ortiz-Bobea (Cornell University [New York]); Emmanuel Paroissien (Université Paris-Saclay, INRAE, UR ALISS)
    Abstract: This paper provides empirical evidence on the welfare losses associated with asymmetric information about product quality in a competitive market. When consumers cannot observe product characteristics at the time of purchase, atomistic producers have no incentive to supply costly quality. We compare wine prices across administrative districts around the enactment of historic regulations aimed at certifying the quality of more than 250 French appellation wines to identify welfare losses from asymmetric information. We estimate that these losses amount to more than 7% of total market value, suggesting an important role for credible certification schemes.
    Keywords: Asymmetric information, Adverse selection, Quality uncertainty, Welfare, Wine appellation
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04148936&r=agr
  20. By: Lucie Sirieix (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Gilles Séré de Lanauze (MRM - Montpellier Research in Management - UPVD - Université de Perpignan Via Domitia - UM - Université de Montpellier); Margot Dyen (IREGE - Institut de Recherche en Gestion et en Economie - USMB [Université de Savoie] [Université de Chambéry] - Université Savoie Mont Blanc); Laurie Balbo (EESC-GEM Grenoble Ecole de Management); Erick Suarez (MRM - Montpellier Research in Management - UPVD - Université de Perpignan Via Domitia - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: The recognition of the necessity to reduce meat consumption in affluent nations is now widely acknowledged. A large body of literature examines the personal factors that lead to meat reduction or avoidance, including the motivations and profiles of individuals. While excluding meat consumption from ones' diet alone could be challenging, surprisingly, literature has sparsely examined the role of communities supporting this process, which includes both practices and convictions. This research seeks to make up for that and aims to investigate the impact of communities (both imagined and real) on the construction of vegetarian and vegan identities. To this end, nineteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with non-meat eaters, ten of whom underwent follow-up interviews. The analyses conducted focused on their practices, convictions, and interactions within communities. The findings revealed two major points: firstly, practices and convictions develop simultaneously and in relation to various types of communities; secondly, identity is constructed through both affiliation and differentiation processes. These findings offer strong theoretical and practical implications by contributing to the understanding of the impact of community-driven value-based identity built on conviction-based consumption practices. For brands, retailers and public policy makers, this research provides practical recommendations for promoting meat-free diets, not only through making information available but also by using the co-evolution of practice and convictions as leverage, and by empowering communities in the process.
    Keywords: Identity, Food marketing, Communities, Identity project, Vegetarian practices, Vegan Practices
    Date: 2023–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04150922&r=agr
  21. By: Ulrike Gisch (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, University of Potsdam = Universität Potsdam, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Margaux Robert (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Noémi Berlin (EconomiX - UPN - Université Paris Nanterre - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Antoine Nebout (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Fabrice Etilé (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PSE - Paris School of Economics - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS-PSL - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Sabrina Teyssier (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Valentina Andreeva (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Serge Hercberg (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, Département de Santé Publique [Avicenne] - Hôpital Avicenne [AP-HP] - AP-HP - Assistance publique - Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP)); Mathilde Touvier (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Sandrine Péneau (CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CRESS - U1153 - Equipe 3: EREN- Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle - Université Sorbonne Paris Nord - CRESS (U1153 / UMR_A_1125 / UMR_S_1153) - Centre de Recherche Épidémiologie et Statistique Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNAM - Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers [CNAM] - HESAM - HESAM Université - Communauté d'universités et d'établissements Hautes écoles Sorbonne Arts et métiers université - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - INSERM - Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale - UPCité - Université Paris Cité - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Mastery is a psychological resource that is defined as the extent to which individuals perceive having control over important circumstances of their lives. Although mastery has been associated with various physical and psychological health outcomes, studies assessing its relationship with weight status and dietary behavior are lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between mastery and weight status, food intake, snacking, and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in the NutriNet-Santé cohort study. Mastery was measured with the Pearlin Mastery Scale (PMS) in 32, 588 adults (77.45% female), the mean age was 50.04 (14.53) years. Height and weight were self-reported. Overall diet quality and food group consumption were evaluated with ≥3 self-reported 24-h dietary records (range: 3–27). Snacking was assessed with an ad-hoc question. ED symptoms were assessed with the Sick-Control-One-Fat-Food Questionnaire (SCOFF). Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between mastery and weight status, food intake, snacking, and ED symptoms, controlling for sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics. Females with a higher level of mastery were less likely to be underweight (OR: 0.88; 95%CI: 0.84, 0.93), overweight [OR: 0.94 (0.91, 0.97)], or obese [class I: OR: 0.86 (0.82, 0.90); class II: OR: 0.76 (0.71, 0.82); class III: OR: 0.77 (0.69, 0.86)]. Males with a higher level of mastery were less likely to be obese [class III: OR: 0.75 (0.57, 0.99)]. Mastery was associated with better diet quality overall, a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables, seafood, wholegrain foods, legumes, non-salted oleaginous fruits, and alcoholic beverages and with a lower consumption of meat and poultry, dairy products, sugary and fatty products, milk-based desserts, and sweetened beverages. Mastery was also associated with lower snacking frequency [OR: 0.89 (0.86, 0.91)] and less ED symptoms [OR: 0.73 (0.71, 0.75)]. As mastery was associated with favorable dietary behavior and weight status, targeting mastery might be a promising approach in promoting healthy behaviors. Clinical Trial Registry Number NCT03335644 at Clinicaltrials.gov .
    Abstract: La maîtrise est une ressource psychologique définie comme la mesure dans laquelle les individus perçoivent qu'ils ont le contrôle des circonstances importantes de leur vie. Bien que la maîtrise ait été associée à divers résultats en matière de santé physique et psychologique, les études évaluant sa relation avec le statut pondéral et le comportement alimentaire font défaut. L'objectif de cette étude transversale était d'évaluer la relation entre la maîtrise et le statut pondéral, la prise alimentaire, le grignotage et les symptômes de troubles alimentaires dans l'étude de cohorte NutriNet-Santé. La maîtrise a été mesurée à l'aide de l'échelle de maîtrise de Pearlin (PMS) chez 32 588 adultes (77, 45 % de femmes), dont l'âge moyen était de 50, 04 (14, 53) ans. L'âge moyen était de 50, 04 (14, 53) ans. La taille et le poids ont été autodéclarés. La qualité globale du régime alimentaire et la consommation de groupes d'aliments ont été évaluées à l'aide de ≥3 relevés alimentaires autodéclarés sur 24 heures (fourchette : 3-27). Le grignotage a été évalué à l'aide d'une question ad hoc. Les symptômes de la dysfonction érectile ont été évalués à l'aide du questionnaire "Sick-Control-One-Fat-Food" (SCOFF). Des analyses de régression linéaire et logistique ont été effectuées pour évaluer la relation entre la maîtrise et le statut pondéral, la prise alimentaire, le grignotage et les symptômes de dysfonctionnement érectile, en tenant compte des caractéristiques sociodémographiques et du mode de vie. Les femmes ayant un niveau de maîtrise plus élevé étaient moins susceptibles d'être en sous-poids (OR : 0, 88 ; 95%CI : 0, 84, 0, 93), en surpoids [OR : 0, 94 (0, 91, 0, 97)], ou obèses [classe I : OR : 0, 86 (0, 82, 0, 90) ; classe II : OR : 0, 76 (0, 71, 0, 82) ; classe III : OR : 0, 77 (0, 69, 0, 86)]. Les hommes ayant un niveau de maîtrise plus élevé étaient moins susceptibles d'être obèses [classe III : OR : 0, 75 (0, 57, 0, 99)]. La maîtrise était associée à une meilleure qualité de l'alimentation en général, à une plus grande consommation de fruits et légumes, de produits de la mer, d'aliments complets, de légumineuses, de fruits oléagineux non salés et de boissons alcoolisées, et à une plus faible consommation de viande et de volaille, de produits laitiers, de produits sucrés et gras, de desserts à base de lait et de boissons sucrées. La maîtrise était également associée à une moindre fréquence de grignotage [OR : 0, 89 (0, 86, 0, 91)] et à une diminution des symptômes de dysfonctionnement érectile [OR : 0, 73 (0, 71, 0, 75)]. La maîtrise étant associée à un comportement alimentaire favorable et au statut pondéral, cibler la maîtrise pourrait être une approche prometteuse pour promouvoir des comportements sains. Numéro d'enregistrement de l'essai clinique NCT03335644 sur Clinicaltrials.gov .
    Keywords: Mastery, Locus of control, Weight status, Diet quality, Food groups, Food consumption, Snacking, Eating disorder, Large population
    Date: 2022–05–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03779024&r=agr
  22. By: Pierre-Emmanuel Arduin (DRM - MLAB - Dauphine Recherches en Management - MLAB - DRM - Dauphine Recherches en Management - Université Paris Dauphine-PSL - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Doudja Saïdi Kabeche (AgroParisTech)
    Abstract: Throughout the world, including in developed countries, the COVID-19 crisis has revealed and accentuated food insecurity. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations clearly defines food security as a situation of not only availability and accessibility but also social acceptability (i.e., adequacy and sustainability). In developed countries, food security remains non-achieved at all. Notably, the so-called "little deprivation" leads the working poor to rely on food aid. We argue that even doing so, they remain food insecure: food aid is socially unacceptable because, despite their work, they are kept away from classical food access paths. In this article, we present the specificities of food aid in France and state some of its limits, namely those associated with the supply chain of donated foodstuffs. We propose a monographic study relying on a mix of firsthand material (six years of fieldwork from students with associations) and secondhand material (analysis of specialized, legal, and activity reports). We describe inspiring initiatives from three French associations and mobilize the recently published analysis of dignity construction in food aid in the United States of America to argue that dignity in food aid logistics is also a knowledge management and digital matter. Indeed, the initiatives of the three considered associations show concretely how knowledge management and digital systems can enhance dignity in food aid logistics.
    Keywords: food aid, food insecurity, logistics, supply chain management, knowledge management, digital systems
    Date: 2022–01–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04157030&r=agr
  23. By: Dembele, Moctar; Salvadore, E.; Zwart, Sander; Ceperley, N.; Mariethoz, G.; Schaefli, B.
    Keywords: Water accounting; Climate change; Transboundary waters; River basins; Models
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:conppr:h051890&r=agr
  24. By: Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia; Rosenbach, Gracie; Mugabo, Serge; Pauw, Karl; Spielman, David J.; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Rwanda’s impressive economic growth over the past two decades has been accompanied by significant structural change in the broad economy and the agrifood system in particular. This note summarizes key results from a recent diagnostic of Rwanda’s agrifood system transformation, examining the effectiveness of productivity-led growth in different agricultural value chains for promoting development outcomes related to poverty, growth, employment, diet quality, and hunger. The findings show that value chains differ in their effectiveness in promoting these different development outcomes. The wheat and sorghum value chain, for example, has strong anti-poverty effects and is effective at reducing hunger, but is less effective at increasing jobs. Trade-offs will emerge as no single value chain is most effective at achieving every desired outcome; therefore, promoting a few value chains jointly will diversify agrifood system growth and help achieve multiple development outcomes simultaneously.
    Keywords: RWANDA, CENTRAL AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, economic growth, agrifood systems, agricultural value chains, development, poverty, employment, diet quallity, hunger
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:rssppn:8&r=agr
  25. By: Karpavicius, Luiza (Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University (ENVS/AU)); Chimeli, Ariaster (Departamento de Economia, Universidade de São Paulo)
    Abstract: Ecosystem degradation and contact with wildlife is often linked to infectious diseases such as COVID-19 and malaria, a major cause of death and incapacitation worldwide. This paper investigates a quasi-experiment involving two forest protection policies for the Brazilian Amazon region and their consequences to malaria incidence. The first inadvertently increased forest degradation in part of the Amazon, whereas the second curbed deforestation in the entire region. Using actual malaria case data distributed across space and over 17 years, we estimate the causal link between deforestation and malaria. The results imply that effective forest protection reduced malaria incidence by over 50%.
    Keywords: Malaria; deforestation; forest protection policies
    JEL: D04 I18 Q23 Q56 Q57 Q58
    Date: 2023–08–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ris:nereus:2023_006&r=agr
  26. By: Ager, Philipp (University of Mannheim); Goñi, Marc (University of Bergen); Salvanes, Kjell G. (Norwegian School of Economics)
    Abstract: This paper studies the link between gender-biased technological change in the agricultural sector and structural transformation in Norway. After WWII, Norwegian farms began widely adopting milking machines to replace the hand milking of cows, a task typically performed by women. Combining population-wide panel data from the Norwegian registry with municipality-level data from the Census of Agriculture, we show that the adoption of milking machines triggered a process of structural transformation by displacing young rural women from their traditional jobs on farms in dairy-intensive municipalities. The displaced women moved to urban areas where they acquired a higher level of education and found better-paid employment. These findings are consistent with the predictions of a Roy model of comparative advantage, extended to account for task automation and the gender division of labor in the agricultural sector. We also quantify significant inter-generational effects of this gender-biased technology adoption. Our results imply that the mechanization of farming has broken deeply rooted gender norms, transformed women's work, and improved their long-term educational and earning opportunities, relative to men.
    Keywords: gender biased technological change, migration, intergenerational mobility
    JEL: J16 J24 J43 J61 N34 O14 O33
    Date: 2023–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iza:izadps:dp16347&r=agr
  27. By: Jana, Sebak Kumar; Pal, Barun Deb; Manna, Siddhartha
    Abstract: The decentralized procurement system of paddy from the farmers in India the was introduced by government of India in the year 1997-98. The Government of West Bengal (GoWB) had implemented electronic paddy procurement (e-procurement) system in 2015-16 and included multiple stakeholders like, state co-operatives, women self-help groups and the state essential commodities corporation to procure paddy across districts. The primary aim for the present study is to assess participation of the farmers in government e-procurement system. Applying double hurdle model this paper finds that knowledge of the farmers about government procurement system, status of registration of the farmers in the government channel, distance of the household from mundi are some of the significant factors in first hurdle of selection of market channel . Holding of KCC, total cultivable land and existence of gola (warehouse) are some significant factors in the second hurdle of quantity sale decision.
    Keywords: Paddy procurement, e-procurement Double Hurdle Model, Participation and Quantity equation, West Bengal, India
    JEL: H1
    Date: 2023–07–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:118027&r=agr
  28. By: Salomé Fournier (ONF, Office National des Forêts - Département Recherche, Fontainebleau, France - UPD7 - Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7); Thierry Sardin (National expert in silviculture - Office National des Forêts); Philippe Dreyfus (ONF - Office national des forêts); Didier Francois (ONF - Office national des forêts); Xavier Mandret (ONF - Office national des forêts); Marion Simeoni (ONF - Office national des forêts); Jean-Pierre Renaud (ONF - Office national des forêts); Emila Akroume (ONF - Office national des forêts); Alain Bouvet (FCBA - Institut Technologique Forêt Cellulose Bois-construction Ameublement); Alain Berthelot (FCBA - Institut Technologique Forêt Cellulose Bois-construction Ameublement); Holger Wernsdörfer (SILVA - SILVA - AgroParisTech - UL - Université de Lorraine - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Miguel Riviere (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - AgroParisTech - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) Mulhouse - Colmar - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Julien Sainte-Marie (SILVA - SILVA - AgroParisTech - UL - Université de Lorraine - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Sandrine Breteau-Amores (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - AgroParisTech - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) Mulhouse - Colmar - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Christine Deleuze (ONF - Office national des forêts); François de Coligny (UMR AMAP - Botanique et Modélisation de l'Architecture des Plantes et des Végétations - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: We provide a database of 52 silvicultural scenarios recommended in French public forests including relevant dendrometric variables and metrics for carbon accounting. The dataset is available at https://doi.org/10.57745/QARRFS . Associated metadata are available at https://metadata-afs.nancy.inra.fr/geonetwork/srv/fre/catalog.search#/metadata/f76ed27f-325d-493b-8731-0995dcaa7805 . Special attention was paid to offer carbon metrics required for the French Label Bas Carbone offset projects.
    Keywords: Forest management, Silviculture, Simulation, Forest dynamics, Carbon, Mitigation
    Date: 2022–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03919731&r=agr
  29. By: Olipra, Jakub
    Abstract: Only 20 years ago, Poland was self-sufficient in pig production, being one of the key players in the European pig market. Since then a growing specialization of Poland in pig finishing and meat processing has been observed, while the domestic production of piglets has declined. As a consequence, Poland has lost its self-sufficiency in pig production and become strongly dependent on imports of piglets, mainly from Denmark. The aim of this paper is to summarize the evolution of the Polish pig industry and specify the main determinants of the Polish imports of Danish piglets. The results of the estimates using the vector error correction model (VECM) show that the volume of the Polish imports of piglets from Denmark may be explained by a degree of specialization of Poland in pig finishing, the phase of pig cycle, and the competitiveness of Polish pork. The results may be helpful in understanding the evolution of the Polish pig industry and its growing dependence on imports of piglets.
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2023–06–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:337445&r=agr
  30. By: Masagca, Macario B. Jr.
    Abstract: This policy brief is based on a study supported by the World Bank through the Department of Agriculture’s Philippine Rural Development Project (PRDP). The study entitled “Study on Pest and Diseases of Calamansi: Paving Ways for the Sustainability of Calamansi in Oriental Mindoro” is a one-year project that aims to help accelerate the institutionalization of mechanism that will sustain the production of disease-free calamansi products in Oriental Mindoro and to help advance the province’s reputation in the national calamansi market as prime producer and supplier of this product. Relevant activities in this study include field surveys, farmers' interviews, software development, greenhouse and scion grove establishment, and pest clinic via the web forum. This policy brief focuses on the (1) status of calamansi pests and diseases infestation in Oriental Mindoro; (2) the capacity of the farmers to address the calamansi pests and diseases problem; and (3) policy recommendations to address the calamansi pests and diseases problem and protect the calamansi industry of Oriental Mindoro.
    Date: 2023–07–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:osf:osfxxx:6zwhb&r=agr
  31. By: Linsenmeier, Manuel
    Abstract: This study examines the effects of temperature variability on long-run economic development. To identify causal effects, a novel econometric strategy is employed, based on spatial first-differences. Economic activity is proxied by satellite data on nightlights. Drawing on climate science, the study distinguishes between temperature variability on three time scales: day-to-day, seasonal, and interannual variability. The results indicate that day-to-day temperature variability has a statistically significant, negative effect on economic activity, while seasonal variability has a smaller but also negative effect. The effect of interannual variability is positive at low temperatures, but negative at high temperatures. Furthermore, the results suggest that daily temperature levels have a non-linear effect on economic activity with an optimal temperature around 15 degrees Celsius. However, most of the estimated effects of variability cannot be explained with this non-linearity and instead seem to be due to larger uncertainty about future temperature realisations. The empirical effects can be found in both urban and rural areas, and they cannot be explained by the distribution of agriculture. The results indicate that projected changes of temperature variability might add to the costs of anthropogenic climate change especially in relatively warm and currently relatively poor regions.
    Keywords: climate; temperature; nightlights; day-to-day variability; seasonal variability; interannual variability; 2300776; UKRI fund
    JEL: Q54 Q56 R11 R12 R14 O13
    Date: 2023–09–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:119485&r=agr
  32. By: Daniel Aronoff; Will Rafey
    Abstract: We introduce an empirical framework for valuing markets in environmental offsets. Using newly-collected data on wetland conservation and offsets, we apply this framework to evaluate a set of decentralized markets in Florida, where land developers purchase offsets from a small number of long-lived producers that restore wetlands over time. We find that offsets led to substantial private gains from trade, creating about $2.2 billion of net surplus from 1995–2018 relative to a historical conservation mandate. Offset trading also led to large differences in hydrological outcomes, driven by significant differences between restored and existing wetlands in terms of area and location. A locally differentiated Pigouvian tax on offset transactions would have prevented $1.3 billion of new flood damage while preserving more than two-thirds of the private gains from trade.
    JEL: L0
    Date: 2023–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:31495&r=agr
  33. By: Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Pradesha, Angga; Randriamamonjy, Josee; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Bangladesh experienced strong annual economic growth of 6.6 percent between 2009 and 2019 (BBS 2021). While the global COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant growth slowdown in 2020, growth started to recover in 2021. However, the recovery was hampered by global commodity market disruptions related to the war in Ukraine beginning in 2022 and the global recession in 2023 (Arndt et al. 2023; Diao and Thurlow 2023). The World Bank (2023) projects growth of 5.2 percent for 2023 and 6.2 percent for 2024, which is slower than the country’s pre-pandemic growth rate. Rapid growth in the past has already led to significant structural shifts in Bangladesh’s economy along with a transformation within the agrifood system (AFS). In this brief, we unpack these trends and future projections further to understand how Bangladesh’s AFS is contributing to growth and transformation in the country.
    Keywords: BANGLADESH, SOUTH ASIA, ASIA, agrifood systems, value chains, markets, agriculture, labour productivity, off-farm employment, poverty, diet quality, jobs, development, gross national product, maize, cattle, gross domestic product (GDP),
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:afsdcs:1&r=agr
  34. By: Mansi Kedia (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)); Rajat Kathuria (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER)); Abhishek Raj; Richa Sekhani; Srishti Sinha
    Abstract: Digital inclusion implies that individuals and communities can access and adopt technology to improve their socio-economic status. India, like most emerging markets, has benefitted immensely from the diffusion of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) diffusion. In rural areas, communication services can often compensate for other infrastructural deficits, catalysing growth. However, market failures in rural areas, magnified by poor connectivity and lack of digitalization, demand policy intervention. Following customary global practice, the Indian government, has made universal broadband a priority objective.
    Keywords: Digital Inclusion, Rural ICT Skills, Digital Literacy, Case Studues, icrier, BIF
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:bdc:report:21-r-03&r=agr
  35. By: Rama, Ruth
    Abstract: Purpose. This research examines the possibility of food and beverage (F&B)-processing multinational corporations serving as a viable conduit for the international diffusion of technology. Methodology. This study utilizes existing literature to analyse three potential avenues through which technology transfer occurs from these corporations to host sectors: contract farming, domestic collaboration for innovation, and spillover effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). Findings. In specific instances, these firms might provide support to local innovators through financial assistance or complementary resources. Additionally, they may actively facilitate technology transfers to particular types of local partners and they may generate demonstration effects. Nevertheless, the prevailing evidence consistently indicates that the impact of FDI on the host sector is generally limited or selective. Practical implications. The findings of this study cast doubt on the overly optimistic views held by international organizations and host governments regarding FDI in the food sector as a major source of cutting-edge technology for host countries. The incentives offered to food and beverage multinationals should be carefully calibrated to strike a balance between acknowledging potential benefits to the sector's innovation system and maintaining a realistic perspective on the actual outcomes. Originality. This study combines and analyses three separate empirical lines of research in parallel to offer factual elements for a policy debate. By integrating these different research approaches, the study aims to contribute to a well-informed discussion on relevant policy matters.
    Keywords: Innovation, internationalisation of R&D, FDI policy, food and beverage sector, contract farming, spillovers of knowledge, cooperation for innovation.
    JEL: F6 F63 F69 O3 O33
    Date: 2023–08–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:118162&r=agr
  36. By: Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josee; Thurlow, James; Diao, Xinshen; Ellis, Mia
    Abstract: Burkina Faso experienced strong annual economic growth of 6.0 percent between 2009 and 2019 (NISD 2021). However, the global COVID-19 pandemic caused a significant slowdown in economic growth in 2020, while an increase in armed insurgencies by domestic terrorist groups also had an adverse effect on the economy. Burkina Faso’s GDP growth is projected to reach 5.0 percent in 2023 and 5.3 percent in 2024 (World Bank 2023), suggesting the economy is unlikely to return to its pre-pandemic growth trajectory. Agriculture remains an important sector, accounting for one-fifth of GDP and nearly half of employment in Burkina Faso. The agriculture sector also performed well, growing at around 5 percent annually in the 2009 to 2019 period (NISD 2021). In this brief, we look beyond primary agriculture to understand how Burkina Faso’s broader agrifood system (AFS) is contributing to growth and transformation in the country.
    Keywords: BURKINA FASO, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, agrifood systems, value chains, markets, agriculture, labour productivity, off-farm employment, poverty, diet quality, jobs, development, gross national product, root crops, livestock, cattle, rice, gross domestic product (GDP),
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:afsdcs:2&r=agr
  37. By: Benfica, Rui; Diao, Xinshen; Pauw, Karl; Thurlow, James; Ellis, Mia
    Abstract: Mozambique was one of the fastest-growing countries in sub-Saharan Africa between 2009 and 2014, with annual growth averaging about 7 percent (INE 2020; World Bank 2023a). However, adverse economic circumstances resulted in a significant weakening of economic growth, which averaged only 4.6 percent over the period 2014 to 2019 (INE 2020; World Bank 2023a). Restrictive COVID-19 policymeasures introduced in 2020 further stifled the economy, resulting in negative growth in 2020 and low growth in 2021. Like many other countries, Mozambique was adversely affected by global commodity market disruptions resulting from the onset of Russia-Ukraine war in 2022 and the global recession in 2023 (Arndt et al. 2023; Diao and Thurlow 2023). Mozambique’s growth is expected to recover in the coming years, with projections of 5.0 percent growth in 2023 and 8.0 percent in 2024 (World Bank 2023b), suggesting the economy is inching back toward its pre-pandemic growth trajectory.
    Keywords: agrifood systems, value chains, markets, agriculture, labour productivity, off-farm employment, poverty, diet quality, jobs, development, gross national product, maize, fish, horticulture, livestock, gross domestic product (GDP),
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:afsdcs:10&r=agr
  38. By: Nora Pankratz; Christoph M. Schiller
    Abstract: This paper examines how physical climate risks affect firms' financial performance and operational risk management in global supply-chains. We document that weather shocks at supplier locations reduce the operating performance of suppliers and their customers. Further, customers respond to perceived changes in suppliers' climate-risk exposure: When realized shocks exceed ex-ante expectations, customers are 6-11% more likely to terminate existing supplier-relationships. Consistent with models of experience-based learning, this effect increases with signal strength and repetition, is insensitive to long-term climate projections, and increases with industry competitiveness and decreases with supply-chain integration. Customers subsequently choose replacement suppliers with lower expected climate-risk exposure.
    Keywords: adaptation; production networks; firm performance; climate change
    JEL: F64 G15 G30 Q54
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2022-56&r=agr
  39. By: Gilles Grolleau (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier, ESSCA Research Lab - ESSCA - Ecole Supérieure des Sciences Commerciales d'Angers); Naoufel Mzoughi (ECODEVELOPPEMENT - Unité de recherche d'Écodéveloppement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: We posit that, once scandals become unavoidable, they can be considered for transformation into opportunities for research institutions, scientific communities and science regulators to implement in-depth changes and policies they would otherwise oppose. Research institutions and scientific communities can take advantage of scandals by participating proactively in constructing their consequences. We develop four mechanisms by which scandals can be used to bring positive change in research institutions and scientific communities. These are nullifying the high-status protection of almost untouchable researchers, ‘resetting' the system that was conducive to scandals, changing the reference point upon which the entity is judged to emphasize progress and offering a learning opportunity to involved parties.
    Date: 2022–12–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03908837&r=agr
  40. By: Nguyen, Peter; Barajas, Jesus M
    Abstract: A variety of web-based mapping and quantitative analysis tools can help planners evaluate whether a given land use efficiency strategy can meet goals, but there has been limited information about the coverage, breadth, and availability of these tools. These tools can assist in the regional implementation of greenhouse gas reduction strategies through land use development. As such, decisionmakers would benefit from knowing which of these tools could serve their needs. Researchers at UC Davis studied methods and tools available to regional and local governments to evaluate the land use efficiency and equity of their policies and plans. The research team then conducted a workshop with regional and local government representatives to identify efficacy, gaps, and potential improvements for these tools. View the NCST Project Webpage
    Keywords: Engineering, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Equity (justice), land use, sustainable development, transportation planning, vehicle miles of travel
    Date: 2023–08–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cdl:itsdav:qt7xv7x65k&r=agr
  41. By: Ligon, Ethan
    Abstract: The hallmark of full risk sharing is that agents' marginal utilities of expenditure (MUEs) have a simple factor structure; a Pareto weight is divided by an aggregate price. Take logarithms and full risk-sharing can be easily tested using panel data with two-way fixed effects. The catch is that we don't directly observe MUEs, and must infer these using data on consumption expenditures. The standard approach to this inference problem is to assume some form of homothetic utility, in which case the MUE is a function of total expenditures and a single price index, and all demands have unit price elasticities. This approach works well when the shocks being tested affect agents' budgets without changing prices; i.e., when the shocks are idiosyncratic. But "covariate" shocks may change relative prices, in which case the standard risk-sharing tests which assume that no demands are inelastic will deliver apparently perverse results. What is the class of utility structures that allow one to test risk-sharing using only panel data on expenditures and two-way fixed effects, and does this class included non-homothetic preferences which are consistent with more realistic demand responses to changes in relative prices? We obtain this class, which happens to be semi-parametric and nests the usual homothetic specification, but which allows for highly flexible Engel curves, with $n$ parameters corresponding to the income elasticities of $n$ goods. We provide a simple algorithm to infer both these parameters and the agents' MUEs. We compute these using panel data from Uganda, and show that risk-sharing tests of covariate shocks using our computed MUEs deliver sensible results while the standard tests do not.
    Keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences, Risk sharing, covariate shocks, Constant Frisch Elasticity demands, Uganda
    Date: 2023–07–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cdl:agrebk:qt2zr503fq&r=agr
  42. By: Diao, Xinshen; Pauw, Karl; Raouf, Mariam; Siddig, Khalid; Thurlow, James; Ellis, Mia
    Abstract: Since the secession of South Sudan in 2011, the Sudanese economy has faced an unprecedented economic downturn caused by the loss of around 75 percent of oil revenue, civil strife, and political instability (Alhelo, Siddig, and Kirui 2023), and more recently, by the impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic and the Russia-Ukraine war (Abay et al. 2023). The political conflict between the civilians and military entities after the fall of the Inghaz regime and the ongoing conflict between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) are driving further deterioration of the economy (Abushama et al. 2023).
    Keywords: REPUBLIC OF THE SUDAN, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, agrifood systems, value chains, markets, agriculture, labour productivity, off-farm employment, poverty, diet quality, jobs, development, gross national product, cereals, cotton, fruits, vegetables, gross domestic product (GDP),
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:afsdcs:17&r=agr

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