nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2023‒05‒08
twenty-two papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. The Impact of CSR on Rural Women Custodians of Seed, Food and Climate Change Resilience in Nigeria’s Niger Delta Region By Joseph I. Uduji; Elda N. Okolo-Obasi
  2. Digital agriculture in Europe and in France: which organisations can boost adoption levels? By Véronique Bellon-Maurel; Isabelle Piot-Lepetit; Nina Lachia; Bruno Tisseyre
  3. Evaluating the Prediction Performance of the International Food Security Assessment's Production Models: A Cross-Validation Approach By Zereyesus, Yacob Abrehe; Baquedano, Felix; Morgan, Stephen
  4. Political constraints and opportunities for agricultural investment in Sudan By D'Silva, Brian; Hassan, Rashid; Hutur, Abdelrahman; Ibrahim, Sami; Abushama, Hala; Siddig, Khalid; Kirui, Oliver K.
  5. ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF POLICIES UNDER SPATIAL INTERFERENCE. THE CASE OF CAP SUPPORT TO ORGANIC FARMING. By Edoardo Baldoni; Roberto Esposti
  6. Locus of Control and Economic Decision-Making: A Field Experiment in Odisha, India By Ahsan Jansson, Cecilia; Patil, Vikram; Vecci, Joe; Chellattan Veettil , Prakashan; Yashodha, Yashodha
  7. Rotational Grazing Adoption by Cow-Calf Operations By Whitt, Christine; Wallander, Steven
  8. Services provided by multifunctional agroecosystems By Alexia Stokes; Géraldine Bocquého; Pascal Carrere; Raphaël Conde Salazar; Marc Deconchat; Léo Garcia; Antoine Gardarin; Christian Gary; Cédric Gaucherel; Mamadou Gueye; Mickael Hedde; Françoise Lescourret; Zhun Mao; Nicolas Quérou; Gabrielle Rudi; Jean-Michel Salles; Raphael Soubeyran; Julie Subervie; Aude Vialatte; Fabrice Vinatier; Marielle Thomas
  9. Factors of formation of customer loyalty to the baby food brand By Alieva Arzu
  10. African economic integration and its effects on climate change adaptation and hunger By Simola, Antti; Boysen, Ole; Ferrari, Emanuele; Nechifor, Victor
  11. Dependency of commercial fisheries on kelp forests for valuation of ecosystem services By Johanna Zimmerhackel; Cristina Piñeiro-Corbeira; Kjell Magnus; Norderhaug; Karen Filbee-Dextera; Thomas Wernberg; GEAK network
  12. The climate change challenge and fiscal instruments and policies in the EU By Avgousti, Aris; Caprioli, Francesco; Caracciolo, Giacomo; Cochard, Marion; Dallari, Pietro; Delgado-Téllez, Mar; Domingues, João; Ferdinandusse, Marien; Filip, Daniela; Nerlich, Carolin; Prammer, Doris; Schmidt, Katja; Theofilakou, Anastasia
  13. Cooperation, Fairness, and Rational Altruism in the Making of the Modern Living Standards. The Case of Maresme (1853-2022) By Jose Luis Martinez-Gonzalez
  14. Green Technology Adoption, Complexity, and the Role of Public Policy: A Simple Theoretical Model By Sanjit Dhami
  15. Policy Responses to High Energy and Food Prices By David Amaglobeli; Mr. Gee Hee Hong; Emine Hanedar; Celine Thevenot; Mengfei Gu
  16. Who Is in and Who Is out in Ocean Economies Development? By Marianna Cavallo; Alicia Bugeja Said; José A Pérez Agúndez
  17. Carbon costs and industrial firm performance: Evidence from international microdata By Arjan Trinks; Erik Hille
  18. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING STRATEGY AND EXPORT PERFORMANCE IN SPANISH WINE FIRMS By Rául Serrano; Juan R. Ferrer; Silvia Abella; Vicente Pinilla
  19. Climate Stress Testing By Viral V Acharya; Richard Berner; Robert Engle; Hyeyoon Jung; Johannes Stroebel; Xuran Zeng; Yihao Zhao
  20. Make ethical marketing happen: a performative approach to managers’ identity work in the food industry By Laetitia Condamin; Valérie-Inès de La Ville
  21. Nonparametric Identification of Differentiated Products Demand Using Micro Data By Steven Berry; Philip Haile
  22. Biodiversity Risk By Giglio, Stefano; Kuchler, Theresa; Stroebel, Johannes; Zeng, Xuran

  1. By: Joseph I. Uduji (University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria); Elda N. Okolo-Obasi (University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria)
    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the multinational oil companies’ (MOCs) corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in Nigeria. Its special focus is to investigate the impact of the global memorandum of understanding (GMoU) on development of enterprising rural women as custodians of seed, food and traditional knowledge for climate change resilience in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach – This paper adopts a survey research technique, aimed at gathering information from a representative sample of the population, as it is essentially cross-sectional, describing and interpreting the current situation. A total of 768 rural women respondents were sampled across the rural areas of the Niger Delta region in Nigeria. Findings - The results from the use of a combined propensity score matching and logit model indicated that the meagre interventions of MOCs’ CSR targeted at the empowerment of rural women in custodians of seed, food and traditional knowledge for climate change resilience recorded significant success in improving the role of women in agricultural production, especially in women involvement across value chains. Practical implications - This suggests that any increase in the MOCs’ CSR targeted at increasing rural women’s access to seed preservation facilities, food processing facilities, extension system that impact strong body of knowledge and expertise that can be used in climate change mitigation, disaster reduction and adaptation strategies, will enhance women’s responsibilities in households and communities, stewards of natural and household resources, and will position them well to contribute to livelihood strategies adapted to changing environmental realities. Social implications – This implies that MOCs’ GMoUs’ policies and practices should enhance women’s participation; value and recognise women’s knowledge; and enable women, as well as men farmers to participate in decision-making process in agriculture, food production, land and governance; as women need to be acknowledged and supported, as the primary producers of food in the region, able to both cultivate healthy food and climate change resilience through small scale agro-ecological farming system. Originality/value – This research contributes to gender debate in agriculture from a CSR perspective in developing countries and rational for demands for social projects by host communities. It concludes that business has an obligation to help in solving problems of public concern.
    Keywords: Environmental justice, custodians of seed, climate change resilience, gender equality, corporate social responsibility, multinational oil companies, sub-Saharan Africa
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:agd:wpaper:23/025&r=agr
  2. By: Véronique Bellon-Maurel (UMR ITAP - Technologies et Méthodes pour les Agricultures de demain - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Institut Convergences Agriculture Numérique #DigitAg - IRSTEA - Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies pour l'Environnement et l'Agriculture); Isabelle Piot-Lepetit (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Institut Convergences Agriculture Numérique #DigitAg - IRSTEA - Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies pour l'Environnement et l'Agriculture); Nina Lachia (UMR ITAP - Technologies et Méthodes pour les Agricultures de demain - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Institut Convergences Agriculture Numérique #DigitAg - IRSTEA - Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies pour l'Environnement et l'Agriculture); Bruno Tisseyre (UMR ITAP - Technologies et Méthodes pour les Agricultures de demain - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Institut Convergences Agriculture Numérique #DigitAg - IRSTEA - Institut National de Recherche en Sciences et Technologies pour l'Environnement et l'Agriculture)
    Abstract: This paper presents the way the digital transformation of the agricultural sector is implemented in Europe and in France. It describes the main European and national strategies, the structure of research and innovation initiatives, and the investment in capacity building to foster innovation, adoption and use. More specifically, the French research and innovation ecosystem on digital agriculture is described. The actors involved come from different organisations, such as research and higher educational institutes, government agencies, agricultural technology (AgTech) companies, farmer unions etc., and work together by means of associations (e.g. Robagri), networks (e.g. RMT Naexus, DigiFermes, Fermes Leader), or living labs (e.g. Occitanum) on both digital technology assessment and co-design. Additionally, support is devoted to capacity building (e.g. Le Mas numérique, Mobilab) and a better understanding of the drivers of adoption and use of digital technologies (e.g. FrOCDA). Among these various organisations, #DigitAg, the Digital Agriculture Convergence Lab, has been created to foster interdisciplinary research on digital agriculture. All these initiatives aim to use digital technologies to support the European Green Deal, Farm-to-Fork and Biodiversity strategies as well as the French orientation towards more agroecological practices for safer and more sustainable food systems. Even though this organisational ecosystem is developing fast, the objective of encouraging the coevolution of both digital and green transformations is not without challenges that still need to be overcome, either through new research, innovations, initiatives or collaborations between the actors involved.
    Keywords: #DigitAg, digital agriculture, digitalisation, Farm-to-Fork, green deal, innovation adoption, innovation ecosystems, innovation use, Digital agriculture Innovation ecosystems Green deal Farm-to-Fork Innovation adoption Innovation use Digitalization #DigitAg, Digital agriculture, Innovation ecosystems, Green deal, Innovation adoption, Innovation use, Digitalization
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04067148&r=agr
  3. By: Zereyesus, Yacob Abrehe; Baquedano, Felix; Morgan, Stephen
    Abstract: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Economic Research Service (ERS) International Food Security Assessment (IFSA) model was developed to help USDA and its stakeholders evaluate the food security status of 76 low- and middle-income countries. The IFSA model provides an estimate of total food demand and food production, both elements in measuring food security. The demand side of the IFSA model is used to estimate the prevalence of country-level food insecurity based on an aggregate food consumption threshold of 2, 100 calories per capita per day. The gap between aggregate domestic food production and food demand is used to estimate the implied additional supply required for each of the 76 countries in the IFSA, which is an indication of potential import needs, including food aid. The primary objective of the IFSA’s supply-side modeling work is to project production. This research evaluates the production model to determine the best performing prediction model specification. This report advances previous research by using a data-driven approach to select the best performing model specification.
    Keywords: International Development, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–11–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:333530&r=agr
  4. By: D'Silva, Brian; Hassan, Rashid; Hutur, Abdelrahman; Ibrahim, Sami; Abushama, Hala; Siddig, Khalid; Kirui, Oliver K.
    Abstract: This note reviews Sudan’s contemporary political landscape and how it affects the viability of much needed investments central to the country’s agricultural transformation. It specifically focuses on livestock and horticulture value chains in Greater Khartoum and natural resource management in the Blue Nile and South Kordofan States. Successive governments have largely neglected the agriculture sector even though it is the largest employment sector in Sudan and contributes about 56 percent to total exports (CBoS, 2020). Moreover, the sector has a high potential for tackling the twin challenges of food insecurity and improving the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. These two are critical priorities given high food price inflation and restricted access to agricultural inputs exacerbated by the Ukraine war. An enabling political and governance environment is essential for adopting and implementing the policies required for agricultural transformation, especially in fragile states like Sudan. This Political Economy Assessment (PEA) exercise has highlighted that the military and paramilitary structures occupy a large market share of the State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs), private company partnerships, and land leases to foreign companies in the agriculture sector. Thus, this study forms a basis for deeper PEA and an opportunity for the exploration of the role of intermediaries and the rent seeking activities at the subsequent levels of agricultural value chains, and the extent to which they are linked to both formal and informal economic structures. We have highlighted how smallholder farmers are largely disadvantaged given the current distribution of economic rents.
    Keywords: REPUBLIC OF THE SUDAN, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, politics, investments, agricultural transformation, livestock, value chains, natural resource management, employment, exports, food insecurity, livelihoods, smallholder farmers, inflation, policies
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:sssppn:4&r=agr
  5. By: Edoardo Baldoni (European Commission, Joint Research Centre); Roberto Esposti (Department of Economics and Social Sciences, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM))
    Abstract: This paper deals with the identification and estimation of a policy impact taking spatial interference explicitly into account. Most literature on treatment-effect estimation excludes this spatial interference by assumption but in several policies spatial interference is very likely to occur as well-known economic forces make contiguity affect both treatment assignment and effect. The paper develops two alternative spatially explicit estimation approaches to take these economic forces into account. These approaches are applied to the support for the adoption of organic farming within the Common Agricultural Policy. The Italian 2008-2020 Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) sample is considered. Results suggest that spatial interference occurs and it is relevant in both treatment assignment and impact. Propensity Score Matching approaches seem more suitable to capture this interference.
    Keywords: Spatial Interference, Treatment effect, Agro-Environmental Policy, Organic Farming.
    JEL: C21 Q15 Q51
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:anc:wpaper:475&r=agr
  6. By: Ahsan Jansson, Cecilia (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University); Patil, Vikram (International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), India); Vecci, Joe (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University); Chellattan Veettil , Prakashan (International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), India.); Yashodha, Yashodha (International Water Management Institute (IWMI), India)
    Abstract: We study psychological impediments that make it difficult to change be- haviour. In particular, we evaluate the impact of a randomised psychological intervention designed to target locus of control–an individual’s belief in their own ability to influence their outcomes – on the adoption of climate resilient technologies. In the control farmers receive a standard agricultural education. Treatment farmers are assigned to one of three treatments where they receive agricultural training and either: a psychological information treatment providing tools to change belief about one’s sense of control, a crop simulation app – al- lowing farmers to simulate their agricultural decisions and a treatment with both combined. Our sample consists of 1674 farmers from 252 villages in Odisha, India. We find that at baseline, the majority do not believe they can influence their agri- cultural outcomes. However, the interventions have little impact on agricultural behaviour, locus of control or aspirations. We then study explanations.
    Keywords: Psychological Impediments; Locus of Control; Agriculture
    JEL: D01 D91 O13
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0833&r=agr
  7. By: Whitt, Christine; Wallander, Steven
    Abstract: Rotational grazing is a management practice in which livestock are cycled through multiple fenced grazing areas (paddocks) in order to manage forage production, forage quality, animal health, and environmental quality. USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and other organizations promote rotational grazing as an important grazing practice for providing improved environ-mental outcomes, relative to continuous grazing, in which livestock are not cycled between grazing areas. USDA, NRCS provides financial assistance for rotational grazing and related management practices through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), and technical assistances through the Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA) program. Despite the breadth of support for rotational grazing, only limited information is available on the prevalence of rotational grazing and the variation in how producers implement the practice, including details on how frequently or “intensively” grazing operations rotate livestock between paddocks and how outcomes such as stocking density and cost relate to system characteristics. This study uses data from the 2018 Agricultural Resource Management Survey Cattle and Calves Cost and Returns Report to fill this information gap. The study finds that about 40 percent of cow-calf operations use rotational grazing, but adoption rates vary by production regions. Most rotational grazing systems are relatively simple. Only 40 percent of cow-calf operations that report using rotational grazing operations use an intensive rotational grazing schedule.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Industrial Organization, Land Economics/Use, Livestock Production/Industries, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–11–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:333532&r=agr
  8. By: Alexia Stokes (AMAP Lab [Saint-Pierre - La réunion] - UMR AMAP - Botanique et Modélisation de l'Architecture des Plantes et des Végétations - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Géraldine Bocquého (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - AgroParisTech - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) - Université de Haute-Alsace (UHA) Mulhouse - Colmar - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Pascal Carrere (UREP - Unité Mixte de Recherche sur l'Ecosystème Prairial - UMR - VAS - VetAgro Sup - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur et de recherche en alimentation, santé animale, sciences agronomiques et de l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Raphaël Conde Salazar (UMR AMAP - Botanique et Modélisation de l'Architecture des Plantes et des Végétations - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Marc Deconchat (DYNAFOR - Dynamiques et écologie des paysages agriforestiers - École nationale supérieure agronomique de Toulouse [ENSAT] - Toulouse INP - Institut National Polytechnique (Toulouse) - UT - Université de Toulouse - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Léo Garcia (UMR ABSys - Agrosystèmes Biodiversifiés - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Antoine Gardarin (Agronomie - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Christian Gary (UMR ABSys - Agrosystèmes Biodiversifiés - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Cédric Gaucherel (UMR AMAP - Botanique et Modélisation de l'Architecture des Plantes et des Végétations - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Mamadou Gueye (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris Dauphine-PSL - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Mickael Hedde (UMR Eco&Sols - Ecologie fonctionnelle et biogéochimie des sols et des agro-écosystèmes - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Françoise Lescourret (PSH - Unité de recherche Plantes et Systèmes de Culture Horticoles - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Zhun Mao (UMR AMAP - Botanique et Modélisation de l'Architecture des Plantes et des Végétations - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Nicolas Quérou (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Gabrielle Rudi (AgroParisTech); Jean-Michel Salles (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Raphael Soubeyran (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Julie Subervie (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Aude Vialatte (DYNAFOR - Dynamiques et écologie des paysages agriforestiers - École nationale supérieure agronomique de Toulouse [ENSAT] - Toulouse INP - Institut National Polytechnique (Toulouse) - UT - Université de Toulouse - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Fabrice Vinatier (UMR LISAH - Laboratoire d'étude des Interactions Sol - Agrosystème - Hydrosystème - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Marielle Thomas (URAFPA - Unité de Recherches Animal et Fonctionnalités des Produits Animaux - UL - Université de Lorraine - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Agroecosystems are facing new challenges in the context of a growing and increasingly interconnected human population, and a paradigm shift is needed to successfully address the many complex questions that these challenges will generate. The transition to providing multiple services within an agroecosystem is a starting point for heightened multifunctionality, however, there is still hesitation among stakeholders about moving towards multi-service systems, largely because of the lack of knowledge linking productivity and multifunctionality. We reason that much of this reticence could be overcome through a better understanding of stakeholder requirements and innovative transdisciplinary research extended in the dimensions of time and space. We assembled experts in France to identify priority research questions for co-constructing projects with stakeholders. We identified 18 key questions, as well as the obstacles that hinder their resolution and propose potential solutions for tackling these obstacles. We illustrate that research into agroecosystem multifunctionality and service production must be a hugely collaborative effort and needs to integrate knowledge from different sectors and communities. Promoting dialogue, standardization and data-sharing would enhance transdisciplinary progress. Biodiversity is highlighted as a key factor to explore and incorporate into modelling approaches, but major advances must be made in the understanding of dynamic changes in the biodiversity-function-service nexus across landscapes. Resolving these research questions will allow us to translate knowledge into decision objectives, identify adaptation and tipping points in agroecosystems and develop social-ecological economic pathways that are adaptive over time.
    Keywords: Biodiversity, Economics, Ecosystem services, Farm, Social-ecological system, Model
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04056486&r=agr
  9. By: Alieva Arzu (Department of Economics, Lomonosov Moscow State University)
    Abstract: Loyalty management is a prerequisite for maintaining the competitiveness of companies and brands. The specifics of loyalty formation significantly depend on the characteristics of customer behavior in a particular market. This article is aimed at empirical identification of factors of customer loyalty in the baby food market. Based on a series of in-depth interviews and a quantitative online survey, the main factors of forming loyalty to the baby food brand are identified, among which expert recommendations occupy a special place and trust. Based on the results obtained, recommendations on loyalty management for players in the baby food industry have been developed.
    Keywords: baby food, customer loyalty, brand loyalty, consumer behavior
    JEL: M30 M31 M37
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:upa:wpaper:0050&r=agr
  10. By: Simola, Antti; Boysen, Ole; Ferrari, Emanuele; Nechifor, Victor
    Abstract: We study the effects of the African Continental Free Trade Area on climate change adaptation and mitigation. We also estimate the consequent effects on African economic prospects and food security. We apply a global CGE model that incorporates with several representative concentration pathways on its baseline.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:pugtwp:333394&r=agr
  11. By: Johanna Zimmerhackel; Cristina Piñeiro-Corbeira; Kjell Magnus; Norderhaug; Karen Filbee-Dextera; Thomas Wernberg; GEAK network
    Abstract: The world’s kelp forests cover over a third of the world’s coastlines and provide numerous benefits to humans. Understanding the values associated with kelp forests is essential for meeting international initiatives concerning ocean accounting and ecosystem assessments. The GEAK network is an international group of expert kelp forest ecologists and environmental economists working to synthesize the values and functions of kelp forests globally. The network has developed a common data collection approach and protocol to quantify the different ecosystem services (e.g., provisioning, regulating, biodiversity, and cultural) provided by kelp forests. This manuscript presents the guidelines for attributing proportional value of kelp dependent commercial and subsistence fisheries to different target species.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2023–04–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uwauwp:334183&r=agr
  12. By: Avgousti, Aris; Caprioli, Francesco; Caracciolo, Giacomo; Cochard, Marion; Dallari, Pietro; Delgado-Téllez, Mar; Domingues, João; Ferdinandusse, Marien; Filip, Daniela; Nerlich, Carolin; Prammer, Doris; Schmidt, Katja; Theofilakou, Anastasia
    Abstract: Fiscal policy plays a prominent role in climate change mitigation and adaptation. An optimal combination of revenue policies, in particular taxes, and expenditure policies, such as subsidies and investment, is essential in order to achieve greenhouse gas emissions targets. This paper analyses the main fiscal instruments in place in European Union Member States, focusing on specific issues, such as the fiscal impact of extreme weather events, the interaction between debt sustainability and climate change, the green investment gap and the distributional impact of climate policies. The paper aims to provide an overview of existing fiscal policies and of the main fiscal challenges for a comprehensive European climate change strategy. JEL Classification: H2, H5, H6, Q54, Q58, D63
    Keywords: carbon tax, climate change, debt sustainability, extreme weather events, green investment, redistribution
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ecb:ecbops:2023315&r=agr
  13. By: Jose Luis Martinez-Gonzalez (Universitat de Barcelona – Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain)
    Abstract: Can attitudes and beliefs within each community, as well as their social capital, explain some of the differences in their development? Conducting a macro study in the Maresme region using data from the Contribution Territorial, which includes 5, 412 agricultural farms, 2, 537 owners, and 13 municipalities (1853-1864), we find levels of rational altruism approaching 50%, confirming recent evidence from experimental economics studies. A particularly interesting finding is the correlation between the most altruistic municipalities 160 years ago and those today with higher levels of human capital and per capita family income, as well as the influence of certain study variables on the prosocial behavior of local oligarchies. This result suggests that the attitudes, beliefs, values, and informal rural rules of the past are factors that complement the quality of national institutions today. Economic history not only helps to explain the origins and different trajectories of local economic development, but, more importantly, informs us that investing in regional policies that promote community spirit is a worthwhile endeavor for the future.
    Keywords: Altruism, peasant communities, human capital, informal institutions, development, social change, collective action
    JEL: B52 D03 D64 N33 O43
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ahe:dtaehe:2304&r=agr
  14. By: Sanjit Dhami
    Abstract: We consider technology choices between green and brown technologies by firms. We use insights from complexity theory and also take account of true uncertainty in designing public policy. The green technology offers relatively higher returns to scale from adoption, and there are type-contingent differences among firms in their suitability for the green technology. We show that the long-run outcome is unpredictable despite there being no fundamental uncertainty in the model; small accidents of history can lead to large effects; and the final outcome is an ‘emergent property’ of the system. We describe the role of taxes and subsidies in facilitating adoption of the green technology. We also consider issues of the conflict between optimal Pigouvian taxes and green technology adoption; optimal temporal profile of subsidies; and the desirability of an international fund to provide technology assistance to poorer countries. Despite the simplicity of the framework, several novel results are demonstrated that typically do not arise in the standard analysis of the problem.
    Keywords: technology choice, climate change, complexity, lock-in effects, increasing returns, green subsidies, public policy, Pigouvian taxes, stochastic dynamics
    JEL: D01 D21 D90 H32
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_10364&r=agr
  15. By: David Amaglobeli; Mr. Gee Hee Hong; Emine Hanedar; Celine Thevenot; Mengfei Gu
    Abstract: The surge in energy and food prices, which was amplified by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, has prompted a flurry of policy responses by countries during 2022. The aim of these policy responses was to mitigate social and economic impact of higher prices. In this paper we document announcements of policy measures based on the Database of Energy and Food Price Actions (DEFPA), which was developed based on two rounds of survey responses of IMF country teams conducted in March/April and June/July of 2022. The paper also provides discussion on policy trade-offs when considering appropriate policy responses both for countries with strong and weak social safety nets. Key policy message is that providing targeted support to households in the form of cash transfers is the most cost-effective way of alleviating the burden on vulnerable households and have to be preferred over broad-based mechanisms that prevent international prices to pass through to domestic consumers.
    Keywords: Energy prices; food Prices; cost of living; social policy
    Date: 2023–03–24
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:imf:imfwpa:2023/074&r=agr
  16. By: Marianna Cavallo (LEMAR - Laboratoire des Sciences de l'Environnement Marin (LEMAR) - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - IFREMER - Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer - UBO - Université de Brest - IUEM - Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INSU - CNRS - Institut national des sciences de l'Univers - UBO - Université de Brest - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Alicia Bugeja Said (Agrikoltura - Ministry for Agriculture, Food, Fisheries and Animal Rights); José A Pérez Agúndez (IFREMER - Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer, AMURE - Aménagement des Usages des Ressources et des Espaces marins et littoraux - Centre de droit et d'économie de la mer - IFREMER - Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer - UBO - Université de Brest - IUEM - Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - INSU - CNRS - Institut national des sciences de l'Univers - UBO - Université de Brest - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
    Abstract: This review engages with the ongoing blue economy debate to decipher old and emerging forms of economic, institutional, physical and social exclusions of local communities and vulnerable societies that may result from the development of ocean projects and policies across the globe. The results of this scientific and policy review show that, whereas for some traditional maritime activities such as fisheries, the drivers of exclusion are well studied and somehow addressed in policies, for other emerging sectors, such as ocean energies or deep-sea mining, there is a lack of understanding on how to recognise and prevent the different forms of exclusion. Exclusion is likely to occur when decisions are taken at the highest level of governance to achieve national or international targets of economic growth, food safety, clean energy or leisure, with little consideration of the effects on local economic, social and environmental contexts. On the other hand, when the principles of inclusiveness are given due consideration, they prove to be beneficial for the societies' well-being, increasing the chance of long-term social acceptability. We conclude that, to embrace inclusiveness, both governments and industries have to (a) go beyond the capitalist commodification of nature and recognise benefits other than the economic ones, namely, emotional, cultural and spiritual; (b) promote initiatives that fulfil local needs in the first place and are adapted to local contexts; (c) cooperate with local institutions and stakeholders to promote the co-management of resources and adaptive development. Likewise, research institutions, funding organisations and governmental agencies have to engage in new ways to assess the effects of ocean development that go beyond the quantitative approach and seek to integrate qualitative information, traditional knowledge and local perceptions.
    Keywords: blue economy blue growth inclusiveness local communities marine governance, blue economy, blue growth, inclusiveness, local communities, marine governance
    Date: 2023–02–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-04044150&r=agr
  17. By: Arjan Trinks (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis); Erik Hille (HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management)
    Abstract: Entrepreneurs seem to be adapting their business operations to climate policy, instead of relocating their business to countries without or with less stringent climate policies. There is little to no evidence that climate policy has depressed the profit, productivity or turnover of an average industrial firm. This follows from a CPB study into the effect of carbon costs for approximately 3 million firms in 32 countries between 2000 and 2019.
    JEL: D22 H23 Q41 Q48 Q52 Q58
    Date: 2023–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cpb:discus:445&r=agr
  18. By: Rául Serrano (Department of Business Administration, Universidad de Zaragoza and Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón); Juan R. Ferrer (Department of Agricultural Economics, Statistics and Business Administration, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid); Silvia Abella (Department of Business Administration, Universidad de Zaragoza); Vicente Pinilla (Department of Applied Economics, Universidad de Zaragoza and Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón)
    Abstract: The objective of this paper is to study the importance that adjustments between the marketing mix of the company and the characteristics of the destination market have in improving export performance. Four adjustments have been analysed: channel, positioning, price and knowledge. The most novel aspect of this research is the use of exports on a firm level, basing their explanation on a combination of the internal decisions of the companies and the characteristics of the destination markets. The results reveal the importance of strategic positioning adjustment between the origin and destination as a key factor that favours exports.
    JEL: F14 M21 Q13 Q17
    Date: 2023–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2023-03&r=agr
  19. By: Viral V Acharya; Richard Berner; Robert Engle; Hyeyoon Jung; Johannes Stroebel; Xuran Zeng; Yihao Zhao
    Abstract: We explore the design of climate stress tests to assess and manage macro-prudential risks from climate change in the financial sector. We review the climate stress scenarios currently employed by regulators, highlighting the need to (i) consider many transition risks as dynamic policy choices; (ii) better understand and incorporate feedback loops between climate change and the economy; and (iii) further explore “compound risk” scenarios in which climate risks co-occur with other risks. We discuss how the process of mapping climate stress scenarios into financial firm outcomes can incorporate existing evidence on the effects of various climate-related risks on credit and market outcomes. We argue that more research is required to (i) identify channels through which plausible scenarios can lead to meaningful short-run impact on credit risks given typical bank loan maturities; (ii) incorporate bank-lending responses to climate risks; (iii) assess the adequacy of climate risk pricing in financial markets; and (iv) better understand and incorporate the process of expectations formation around the realizations of climate risks. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of using market-based climate stress tests that can be conducted using publicly available data to complement existing stress testing frameworks.
    Keywords: climate finance
    JEL: G00
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_10345&r=agr
  20. By: Laetitia Condamin (Métis Lab EM Normandie - EM Normandie - École de Management de Normandie); Valérie-Inès de La Ville (Axe 1 (2022-2027) : "Vulnérabilités et risques" (MSHS Poitiers) - MSHS - Maison des sciences de l'homme et de la société de Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CEREGE - Centre de Recherche en Gestion - IAE Poitiers - Institut d'Administration des Entreprises (IAE) - Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - ULR - La Rochelle Université - Excelia Group | La Rochelle Business School)
    Abstract: Although it claims a growing involvement in sustainable development, the marketing profession suffers from a negative image because it is accused of stimulating overconsumption and greenwashing. In order to analyze how marketing managers deal with these ethical tensions in their identity work, this article mobilizes theories of performativity. The aim is to understand how managers' discourses on the marketing profession shape their practices and their processes of subjectivation. Based on 15 in-depth interviews, this work identifies five registers of performativity through which marketing managers discursively construct their professional identities: i) reflexive realist, ii) reflexive destabilized, iii) reflexive detached, iv) voluntarist defensive and v) conquering utilitarian. This article shifts the literature on ethics in marketing from positive (what marketers do) and normative (what marketers should do) approaches to a performative approach (how marketers construct their profession). This research highlights that the relationship between discourse and practice is not antagonistic in nature, but must be understood as mutually constitutive, which opens up a reflection on how to bring about ethical marketing within organizations.
    Abstract: Bien qu'elle revendique une participation croissante au développement durable, la profession marketing souffre d'une image négative parce qu'elle est accusée de stimuler la surconsommation et le greenwashing. Afin d'analyser comment les managers marketing font face à ces tensions éthiques dans leur travail identitaire, cet article mobilise les théories de la performativité. Il s'agit de comprendre comment les discours des managers sur la profession marketing façonnent leurs pratiques et leurs processus de subjectivation. Fondé sur 15 entretiens en profondeur, ce travail identifie cinq registres de performativité par lesquels les managers-marketing construisent discursivement leurs identités professionnelles : i) réflexif réaliste, ii) réflexif déstabilisé, iii) réflexif détaché, iv) volontariste défensif et v) conquérant utilitariste. Cet article opère un déplacement de la littérature sur l'éthique en marketing des approches positives (ce que font les marketeurs) et normatives (ce que devraient faire les marketeurs) vers une approche performative (comment les marketeurs construisent leur profession). Cette recherche souligne que la relation entre discours et pratiques n'est pas de nature antagoniste, mais doit être comprise comme mutuellement constitutive, ce qui ouvre une réflexion sur les manières de faire advenir un marketing éthique au sein des organisations.
    Keywords: Identity work, Professionalization, Ethics, Performativity theories, Managers marketing, Travail identitaire, Profession, Ethique, Performativité
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-04003393&r=agr
  21. By: Steven Berry (Cowles Foundation, Yale University); Philip Haile (Cowles Foundation, Yale University)
    Abstract: We examine identification of differentiated products demand when one has Òmicro dataÓ linking the characteristics and choices of individual consumers. Our model nests standard specifications featuring rich observed and unobserved consumer heterogeneity as well as product/market-level unobservables that introduce the problem of econometric endogeneity. Previous work establishes identification of such models using market-level data and instruments for all prices and quantities. Micro data provides a panel structure that facilitates richer demand specifications and reduces requirements on both the number and types of instrumental variables. We address identification of demand in the standard case in which non-price product characteristics are assumed exogenous, but also cover identification of demand elasticities and other key features when these product characteristics are endogenous and not instrumented. We discuss implications of these results for applied work.
    Date: 2022–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2357&r=agr
  22. By: Giglio, Stefano; Kuchler, Theresa; Stroebel, Johannes; Zeng, Xuran
    Abstract: We explore the effects of physical and regulatory risks related to biodiversity loss on economic activity and asset values. We first develop a news-based measure of aggregate biodiversity risk and analyze how it varies over time. We also construct and publicly release several firm-level measures of exposure to biodiversity risk, based on textual analyses of firms' 10-K statements, a large survey of financial professionals, regulators, and academics, and the holdings of biodiversity-related funds. Exposures to biodiversity risk vary substantially across industries in a way that is economically sensible and distinct from exposures to climate risk. We find evidence that biodiversity risks already affect equity prices: returns of portfolios that are sorted on our measures of biodiversity risk exposure covary positively with innovations in aggregate biodiversity risk. However, our survey indicates that market participants do not perceive the current pricing of biodiversity risks to be adequate.
    Date: 2023–04–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:osf:socarx:n7pbj&r=agr

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