nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2023‒03‒06
27 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. The role of market concentration in the agrifood industry By Hernandez, Manuel A.; Espinoza, Alvaro; Berrospi, Maria Lucia; Deconinck, Koen; Swinnen, Johan; Vos, Rob
  2. MODELLING SCENARIOS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE LIVESTOCK SECTOR By Strokov Anton S; Potashnikov Vladimir Yu
  3. The Ukraine war and its food security implications in Sri Lanka By Thibbotuwawa, Manoj; Dissanayake, Nimesha; Niwarthana, Sachini
  4. Internal Migration as a Response to Soil Degradation: Evidence from Malawi By Keiti Kondi; Stefanija Veljanoska
  5. ECONOMICS AND HUMAN DIMENSION OF ACTIVE MANAGEMENT OF FOREST-GRASSLAND ECOTONE IN SOUTH-CENTRAL USA UNDER CHANGING CLIMATE By Mishra, Bijesh
  6. Impact of climate change beliefs on farm households’ adaptation behaviors: the case of Ivory Coast. By Louise Ella Desquith
  7. RUSSIANS’ FOOD-CONSUMPTION PRACTICES UNDER THE RISING PRICES By Trotsuk Irina V; Shagaida Nataliya I.
  8. Climate Change in Developing Countries: Global Warming Effects, Transmission Channels and Adaptation Policies By Olivier R de Bandt; Luc Jacolin; Thibault Lemaire
  9. Distortions, Producer Dynamics, and Aggregate Productivity: A General Equilibrium Analysis By Stephen Ayerst; Loren Brandt; Diego Restuccia
  10. The Economic and Environmental Benefits of Insects as a Sustainable Food Source By Han, YouAI
  11. Do Contribution of Agriculture Procedures Differ Across States? A Survey of Methodological Approaches Used by Economists By English, Leah; Popp, Jennie; Miller, Wayne
  12. ONLINE WINE PURCHASING IN SPAIN AND PORTUGAL DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC By Katrin Simón-Elorz; Tânia Gonçalves; Raúl Compés; Samuel Faria; Vicente Pinilla; João Rebelo
  13. Performances of innovative agricultural cooperatives: the case of Nopaltec for the development of prickly pear in Algeria By Noure El Imene Boumali; Fateh Mamine; Cheriet Foued; Etienne Montaigne
  14. Analysis of the effect of crop diversification on food security in Burkina Faso By Zalissa Sanfo
  15. To understand climate change adaptation we must characterize climate variability. Here’s how. By Pisor, Anne; Touma, Danielle; Singh, Deepti; Jones, James Holland
  16. Discrete and Smooth Scalar-on-Density Compositional Regression for Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Rice Yield in Vietnam. By Thomas-Agnan, Christine; Simioni, Michel; Trinh, Thi-Huong
  17. The effect of the 7R allele at the DRD4 locus on risk tolerance is independent of background risk in Senegalese fishermen By Gwen-Jirō Clochard; Aby Mbengue; Clément Mettling; Birane Diouf; Charlotte Faurie; Omar Sene; Emilie Chancerel; Erwan Guichoux; Guillaume Hollard; Michel Raymond; Marc Willinger
  18. Papua New Guinea food price bulletin: January 2023 By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  19. "Color on Food Packaging as Brand Visibility and Value Creation: A Systematic Review " By Wirania Swasty
  20. Long-term effects of rainfall shocks on foundational cognitive skills: Evidence from Peru By Nicolas Pazos; Marta Favara; Alan Sánchez; Douglas Scott; Jere Behrman
  21. Mitigating poverty and undernutrition through social protection: A simulation analysis of the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh and Myanmar By Ecker, Olivier; Alderman, Harold; Comstock, Andrew R.; Headey, Derek D.; Mahrt, Kristi; Pradesha, Angga
  22. Risk averse policies foster bio-economic sustainability in mixed fisheries By Eric Tromeur; Luc Doyen; Violaine Tarizzo; L. Richard Little; Sarah Jennings; Olivier Thébaud
  23. Animal Protection and Information Avoidance By Völker, Richard; Gruener, Sven
  24. Efficient Adaptation to Flood Risk By Winston P. Hovekamp; Katherine R. H. Wagner
  25. Climate Change and Energy Security: The Dilemma or Opportunity of the Century? By Mr. Serhan Cevik
  26. Idiosyncratic Dynamic Capabilities and Institutional Blockchain-driven Land Information Management in Developing Countries By Nonso Ewurum; Kenechi Ifeanacho; Okwuchi Juliet Akalemeaku; Ezinne Onyekwelu
  27. Reviewing the Success Factors of Adaptive Reuse Strategy in Practice; A Case Study of Fenix Food Factory By Fatemeh Vafaie; Hilde Remøy

  1. By: Hernandez, Manuel A.; Espinoza, Alvaro; Berrospi, Maria Lucia; Deconinck, Koen; Swinnen, Johan; Vos, Rob
    Abstract: The role of market concentration and potential market power exertion in the agri-food industry is a topic of longstanding interest and concern to policymakers, stakeholders, and researchers. This study provides a comprehensive overview of recent trends in market concentration upstream, midstream, and downstream the agri-food industry at the global, regional, and country level, and assesses how and to what extent concentration could be affecting market conduct and performance of food systems in developed and developing countries. The analysis additionally discusses, to the extent detectable, implications of concentration, including vertical and horizontal integration that favor concentration, for food security and nutrition and environmental sustainability. While market concentration in the agri-food industry has increased across most segments, the evidence on market power exertion is inconclusive. Several knowledge and data gaps are identified and additional research is necessary to derive more general conclusions and policy recommendations.
    Keywords: agricultural economics; agrifood sector; environment; food security; nutrition; sustainability; market concentration
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:2168&r=agr
  2. By: Strokov Anton S (The Russian Presidential Academy Of National Economy And Public Administration); Potashnikov Vladimir Yu (The Russian Presidential Academy Of National Economy And Public Administration)
    Abstract: The relevance of the study is determined by the need to analyze the consequences of the concentration of livestock farms, not only from an economic point of view, but also from an environmental one. The objective of the research is to develop ways for sustainable development of animal husbandry in Russia, taking into account the possibilities of continuous growth in production and export of meat and milk, balanced by current environmental problems (growth of farm waste) and the possibilities of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The subject of the research is the environmental indicators characterizing the externalities arising from the production of livestock products (meat, milk, eggs). The work uses traditional scientific methods - descriptive, analytical, statistical and methods of economic and mathematical modeling. The sources of information were Russian and foreign scientific publications, official publications of regulatory documents and statistical data of state authorities of Russia, as well as foreign databases on agricultural statistics. The reported results conclude that the concentration of livestock production facilities leads to different environmental consequences. Among the leading regions specializing in livestock products, the highest concentration is in the Central Black Earth Region: the Belgorod and Kursk regions account for almost 30% of all agricultural waste in Russia. The greenhouse gas emissions were estimated using the GLOBIOM partial equilibrium model. The calculation results showed that Belgorod region has one of the lowest carbon footprint indicators in livestock production: 8 tons of СО2 equiv. per one ton of protein, which is associated with the low-carbon development of poultry farming. In other regions, which specialize in dairy and beef cattle breeding, the carbon footprint is at least twice as high, for example, in the Krasnodarsky krai; however, the indicators of waste output per unit of production, on the contrary, are lower there. Thus, the scientific novelty of the research lies in the development of scientific and analytical tools for the correct identification of local, regional and global environmental risks when assessing the efficiency of meat, milk and eggs production. So, in our study, local risks were assessed through the concentration of manure (nitrogen) elements per unit of agricultural land and cultivated area at the level of municipalities. Regional risks were assessed through the indicator of waste from agricultural products. And global risks were assessed through an indicator of greenhouse gas emissions, which also allowed us to estimate the so-called cumulative carbon footprint of each region per unit of animal protein produced. Based on the results of the study, recommendations were developed to improve statistical reporting on production waste in the agricultural sector; to differentially collect and publish data on various types of feeding of farm animals in different categories of farms, which will subsequently help to better calculate animal diets and their potential waste and greenhouse gas emissions, in order to identify the most "wasteful” and “sustainable” animal husbandry practices.
    Keywords: externalities, livestock production, production concentration, greenhouse gas emissions, carbon footprint, agricultural policy, environmental policy
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rnp:wpaper:w2022035&r=agr
  3. By: Thibbotuwawa, Manoj; Dissanayake, Nimesha; Niwarthana, Sachini
    Abstract: The Ukraine War has had major implications for food security and food systems across the world given the important role both Russia and Ukraine play in global food, fertilizer, and energy markets. Russia and Ukraine together supply about 12% of global agricultural exports on a caloric basis and over 30% of global wheat exports.1 Fertilizer and energy markets experienced rising prices and supply disruptions as well. The Russia-Ukraine conflict heavily impacted food security in Sri Lanka which is dependent on imports from the Caspian region. The impact of this shock has been compounded for Sri Lanka which has been suffering from a severe economic crisis due to a lack of foreign reserves, a debt default, high inflation, import restrictions, and shortages of critical goods and services. These compound crises have halted Sri Lanka’s progress on economic development and its achievement of the SDGs. Progress had been significant with the share of undernourished population declining from 16.7% in 2001 to 3.4% in 2020.2 During the same period the prevalence of stunting declined from 20.6% to 16%.3 The prevalence of wasting among children under age five declined from 15.9% in 2000 to 15.1% in 2016. Sri Lanka was ranked 65th out of 116 countries on the Global Hunger Index and 77th out of 113 countries on the Global Food Security Index in 2022 suggesting the need for some improvements in the food system. The latest food security assessment by the World Food Program (WFP) notes that about 30% of the population of 22 million (6.26 Mn people) are food insecure.4 Further, most households are regularly employing food-based coping strategies such as eating less preferred and less nutritious food and reducing the amount of food they eat. Further, an estimated 200, 000 households are using emergency livelihood coping strategies that are likely to severely impact their income-generating activities and it is anticipated that more people are turning to these coping strategies as the crisis deepens. Against this backdrop, this policy brief explores the impacts of the evolving crisis in Ukraine on the nexus of poverty, agriculture, and food security in Sri Lanka and the possible avenues for mitigating the negative implica-tions of export restrictions, rising import costs, and inflation.
    Keywords: SRI LANKA; agriculture; armed conflicts; economic development; foreign trade; fertilizer industry; exports; food security; imports; inflation; war
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:resapn:24&r=agr
  4. By: Keiti Kondi (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES)); Stefanija Veljanoska (CREM, Université de Rennes)
    Abstract: We study how the slow deterioration of soil, caused by climate change, affects internal migration and household resettlement. Rural households are expected to move when they face worsening soil conditions, as soil degradation is detrimental to agricultural productivity. The other possibility is that they can get stuck in a poverty trap. We use the Integrated Household Survey in Malawi for the years 2010-2016. Soil depletion is not a random process and to account for its endogeneity, we instrument soil degradation by using distant climate shocks and controlling for recent weather conditions. We find that severe soil nutrient constraints push households to send their members away. The underlying mechanism is that soil degradation is harmful to agricultural productivity, and therefore food security, which incentivizes households to seek better opportunities by pushing their members to migrate.
    Keywords: land degradation, migration, internal migration, resettlement, land quality, climate change, soil nutrition
    JEL: J1
    Date: 2023–01–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ctl:louvir:2023004&r=agr
  5. By: Mishra, Bijesh
    Abstract: The south-central ecotone of the USA, characterized by a mix of forest, savanna, and grasslands, previously maintained by fire, is changing towards closed-canopy forest due to exclusion of fire. The management is complicated by the encroachment of species such as eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) and changing climate such as drought and more sporadic rainfall. Active management using prescribed fire and thinning can restore the ecosystem services, generate revenue, and motivate landowners to manage their land, but the cost is a major barrier. However, economic benefit from actively managed ecosystem under changing climate is not well known in this region. I estimated benefits of various ecosystems maintained using prescribed fire and thinning under changing climate scenarios. I further studied the willingness to pay (WTP), and intentions of landowners to actively manage their land for deer habitat management. I found that sawlog generally increased with the increase in rainfall, but pulpwood growth varied by management regime. The change in net future value (NFV) from timber was relatively stable in non-burned stands compared to frequently burned stands with increasing rainfall. The change in timber volume was greater in harvested and thinned stands. Stands burned in two- and three-year intervals the supported the greatest number of cattle and deer. The willingness to pay for deer hunting was higher in hunting sites with opportunities to observe more deer per visit. The WTP to observe 10 and 6 deers per visit instead of 1 deer per visit are about $11 and $9, respectively. The WTP for deer hunting was higher for deer habitats with food plots and deer sanctuaries. Forest canopy cover had non-significant impact on WTP for deer hunting, providing flexibility for landowners to change canopy and manage land for multiple objectives such as hunting, wildlife management, cattle grazing, and timber production. Landowners had positive intentions, social pressure, but the negative attitude toward actively managing their land. Financial burden, potential reasons for negative attitude, can be offset by revenue generated by managing land for multiple objectives.
    Keywords: Benefit cost analysis; Best worst choice; Ecosystem valuation; Theory of planned behavior; Theory of reasoned action; Wildlife management
    JEL: Q15 Q23 Q26 Q30 Q51 Q54 Q57
    Date: 2022–07–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:116200&r=agr
  6. By: Louise Ella Desquith
    Abstract: This paper examines how climate beliefs influence the climate change adaptation decisions of Ivorian farmers. Two regions (Bouaké and Bonoua) were selected for data collection and 658 households were surveyed according to the level of exposure to climate shocks and the type of farming practiced. Using a multivariate probit model, we analyze the impact of climate beliefs on decisions to implement an adaptation strategy. Our results indicate that the impact of beliefs on adaptation decisions differs according to the region considered. In Bouaké, religious and traditional beliefs, and subjective predictions about temperature and rainfall trends are the determining factors in farmers' adaptation decisions. In the Bonoua locality, however, concerns about climate change and confidence in scientific studies on the worsening of CC determine farmers' adaptation decisions. Based on our results, we develop policy guidelines.
    Keywords: Climate change, beliefs, climate adaptation, behavior, multivariate Probit, farm households
    JEL: Q54 C13 D81
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:drm:wpaper:2023-5&r=agr
  7. By: Trotsuk Irina V (THE RUSSIAN PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY OF NATIONAL ECONOMY AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION); Shagaida Nataliya I. (THE RUSSIAN PRESIDENTIAL ACADEMY OF NATIONAL ECONOMY AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION)
    Abstract: The relevance of the study is explained by its design to constantly monitor the state and risks of food security in Russia, the importance of such monitoring ever increasing with the pandemic and a resulting decrease in household incomes. The objective of the study is to examine the degree to which the Russian society has achieved food security, not according to government programs and strategies of national development, but regarding the economic affordability of food for the population. The subject of the research is the Russians’ everyday food practices and their perception of personal and family risks in food consumption. By 2020, a sociological monitoring model was developed and successfully tested, which is a combination of two methods – a representative telephone survey (nationwide sampling) and ‘expert’ interviews (the longest conversations of interviewers with respondents are transcribed in order to identify explanations in respondents’ answers to the questions of the standardized formalized interview). The results of the study (sociological data) supplement the statistical and economic assessments of the possibilities and limitations of the stable functioning of the internal market given the global economy shocks. The study allows a more accurate assessment of the state of the domestic market under the rising prices and the government’s attempts to limit them. Thus, we can make the following conclusions: the Russians’ inconsistent self-assessments of food practices can be explained by two factors – Russians not only assess their past and present food-consumer practices, but also compare their life situation with those around them; before the pandemic, the food assortment began to expand, and in the difficult social-economic conditions, exacerbated by the pandemic restrictions, food became almost the only source of a sense of ‘normality’ and of bright exceptions in the routine. In recent years, Russians have developed a stable model of food consumption, primarily due to the objective factors – the expansion and strengthening of retail chains, the rise in food prices and the exhaustion of households’ self-supplying strategies. Financial constraints, i.e. economic access to food, are the main threat to the food security situation in Russia. The scientific novelty of the study is the proposed interdisciplinary nature at the theoretical level (a combination of economic and sociological approaches) and methodological triangulation (quantitative and qualitative survey methods) at the empirical level. The proposed approach and the results of its application allow to recommend that the country’s leadership abandon its calls and attempts to stop the rise in food prices, which is somewhat late and ineffective, especially under the pandemic, and focus on a differentiated approach to increasing the economic access to food, instead of punitive measures restricting price growth.
    Keywords: Food security, physical access to food, economic access to food, consumer practices, family budget of Russian households, sociological monitoring
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rnp:wpaper:w2022004&r=agr
  8. By: Olivier R de Bandt (Banque de France - Banque de France - Banque de France); Luc Jacolin (Banque de France - Banque de France - Banque de France); Thibault Lemaire (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Banque de France - Banque de France - Banque de France)
    Abstract: Using panel data covering 126 low- and middle-income countries over 1960-2017, we find that sustained positive temperature deviations from their historical norms have a non-linear negative effect on economic growth and growth per capita. A sustained 1°C temperature increase lowers real GDP per capita annual growth by 0.74–1.52 percentage points, irrespective of levels of development. We also find that temperature rise affects the households' intertemporal trade-off between consumption and investment, since the share of private consumption in total value-added increases while the share of investment declines. A sectoral decomposition shows that the share of industrial value-added also declines. While the share of agricultural value-added increases, agricultural output and productivity declines. Taken together, our results suggest that global warming will reinforce development traps, hindering further adaptation to climate change, particularly in the countries with the lowest levels of income given their lower resilience and higher socioeconomic vulnerability.
    Keywords: Climate Change, Economic Growth, Adaptation, Developing Countries
    Date: 2021–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-03948704&r=agr
  9. By: Stephen Ayerst; Loren Brandt; Diego Restuccia
    Abstract: The expansion in farm size is an important contributor to agricultural productivity in developed countries, but the reallocation process is hindered in less developed economies. How do distortions to factor reallocation affect farm dynamics and agricultural productivity? We develop a model of heterogeneous farms making cropping choices and investing in productivity improvements. We calibrate the model using detailed farm-level panel data from Vietnam, exploiting regional differences in agricultural institutions and outcomes. We focus on south Vietnam and quantify the effect of higher measured distortions in the North on farm choices and agricultural productivity. We find that the higher distortions in north Vietnam reduce agricultural productivity by 46%, accounting for around 70% of the observed 2.5-fold difference between regions. Moreover, two-thirds of the productivity loss is driven by farms' choice of lower productivity crops and reductions in productivity-enhancing investment, which more than doubles the productivity loss from factor misallocation.
    Keywords: Farm dynamics, productivity, size, distortions, misallocation, Vietnam.
    JEL: O11 O14 O4
    Date: 2023–02–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-748&r=agr
  10. By: Han, YouAI
    Abstract: The Economic and Environmental Benefits of Insects as a Sustainable Food Source.
    Date: 2023–01–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:osf:osfxxx:xmvqr&r=agr
  11. By: English, Leah; Popp, Jennie; Miller, Wayne
    Abstract: Contribution analyses performed using IMPLAN data and software are an increasingly popular method for illustrating the importance of agriculture to state and local economies. Over the past decade, at least 24 states have used IMPLAN to conduct contribution of agriculture analyses at some level. In many cases, methods for conducting these analyses are described, however most descriptions aren’t presented in sufficient detail to allow an effective comparison of procedures used between studies. To further analyze methodological variations between contribution of agriculture studies, an online survey was developed and distributed to agricultural economists across the country. Survey questions focused on respondents’ choices related to trade flow models, multipliers, model customization procedures, and agricultural sector selection. Results of the survey show that, although there are general similarities in methodologies between researchers, no two agricultural economics researchers appear to perform contribution of agriculture analyses the same way. These results suggest a need for the development of standard procedures for use in conducting contribution of agriculture analyses, as this would function to increase transparency and comparability between studies.
    Keywords: Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uarksp:330473&r=agr
  12. By: Katrin Simón-Elorz (Department of Business Administration, Universidad Pública de Navarra and INARBE); Tânia Gonçalves (Department of Economics, Sociology and Management (DESG), Centre for Transdisciplinary Development Studies (CETRAD), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro); Raúl Compés (Department of Economics and Social Sciences. Universitat Politècnica de València); Samuel Faria (PhD student and fellowship of project SUDOE VINCI SOE3/P2/F0917); Vicente Pinilla (Department of Applied Economics, Universidad de Zaragoza and Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Facultad de Economia y Empresa); João Rebelo (Department of Economics, Sociology and Management (DESG), Centre for Transdisciplinary Development Studies (CETRAD), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD))
    Abstract: This paper assesses the impact of Covid-19 on the online wine purchasing patterns. This extraordinary situation has accelerated the online trend in wine purchasing. An analysis of the behaviour of online wine consumers before and during the pandemic period shows changes in purchasing patterns. Based on a survey carried out for Spain and Portugal, we find differences between the two countries. The results suggest that the online wine purchasing trend prior to the lockdown was been modified by the pandemic situation. It is therefore important to identify whether these changes are still in place and whether they are here to stay perspective. On the one hand, the culmination of the modern nutritional transition. On the other hand, high-income countries have presented two kinds of food consumption models. The first model is featured by an increasing mass agro-industrial food intake, while the second one consisted of a decrease in caloric intakes jointly with rising consumption of transformed and differentiated products. Focusing on Spain as our case study, the objective of this paper is to unveil to what extent the diffusion of these two consumption patterns have affected inequalities by levels of income and by regions.
    Keywords: online wine purchases, wine consumer behaviour, wine industry.
    JEL: D12 Q13
    Date: 2023–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2023-01&r=agr
  13. By: Noure El Imene Boumali (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Fateh Mamine (Accompagnement Stratégie); Cheriet Foued (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Etienne Montaigne (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement)
    Abstract: This study highlights the impact of innovation on the market orientation and performance of a cooperative for the valorization of prickly pear co-products in Algeria. While the collective entrepreneurship outcomes have been widely discussed, it has been much less so for innovative cooperatives. In this paper, we focus on the performance of this model of entrepreneurship based on the reappropriation of technical innovations. In this sense, our analysis seeks to extend previous empirical research on the performance of agricultural cooperatives by introducing market orientation and a more comprehensive assessment of the socioeconomic performance of innovative cooperatives like Nopaltec. Our results on « alternatives » performances – role in collective appropriation and dissemination of innovation, sector structuration, socio-political and territorial functions of the cooperative – argue for a broader conception of the performances of agricultural cooperative structures.
    Abstract: Cette étude met en lumière l'impact de l'innovation sur l'orientation-marché et les performances d'une coopérative de valorisation des coproduits du figuier de barbarie en Algérie. Alors que la question des performances de l'entreprenariat collectif a été largement débattue, elle l'a été beaucoup moins pour des coopératives innovantes. Dans ce travail, nous mettons l'accent sur les performances de ce modèle d'entreprenariat fondé sur la réappropriation d'innovations techniques. Dans ce sens, notre analyse cherche à étendre la recherche empirique antérieure sur les performances des coopératives agricoles en introduisant l'orientation vers le marché et une évaluation plus globale des performances socioéconomiques des coopératives innovantes comme Nopaltec. Nos résultats portant sur les « autres » performances – rôle dans l'appropriation collective et la diffusion de l'innovation, structuration de la filière, fonctions socio-politique et territoriale de la coopérative – plaident pour une lecture élargie des performances des structures coopératives agricoles.
    Keywords: cooperative, innovation, performance assessment, prickly pear, Algeria, coopérative, évaluation de la performance, figue de Barbarie, Algérie, cooperative innovation performance assessment prickly pear Algeria
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03956075&r=agr
  14. By: Zalissa Sanfo (CEDRES - Université de Ouaga II)
    Abstract: The purpose of this article is to analyze the effect of crop diversification on the food security of agricultural households in Burkina Faso. The Simpson index of diversification has been used to measure crop diversification and the "endogenous switching model" to correct the existing selection bias between diversification and food security. Our findings show that diversifying households are more food insecure than non-diversifying households. These findings support that crop diversification should be backed up by the use of fertilizers. Thus, if the government wants to improve the food security of agricultural households through crop diversification, it is necessary to put particular emphasis on input policies.
    Abstract: Le présent article a pour objectif d'analyser l'effet de la diversification des cultures sur la sécurité alimentaire des ménages agricoles au Burkina Faso. L''indice de Simpson de la diversification a été utilisé pour mesurer la diversification des cultures et l'« endogenous switching model » pour corriger le biais de sélection existant entre la diversification et la sécurité alimentaire. Nos résultats montrent que les ménages diversifiants sont plus en insécurité alimentaire que les ménages non diversifiants. Ces résultats soutiennent que la diversification des cultures doit être soutenue par une utilisation des engrais. Ainsi, si le gouvernement veut améliorer la sécurité alimentaire des ménages agricoles à travers la diversification des cultures, il est nécessaire de mettre un accent particulier sur les politiques d'intrants.
    Keywords: Diversification, Food security, SANFO Zalissa, Sécurité alimentaire, Burkina Faso
    Date: 2022–09–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03869599&r=agr
  15. By: Pisor, Anne (Washington State University); Touma, Danielle; Singh, Deepti; Jones, James Holland (Stanford University)
    Abstract: Climate change adaptation involves the management of the climate-related risks, and the IPCC says we must prioritize adaptation immediately. However, researchers and policymakers have little systematic understanding of which adaptations actually reduce risks, including under different climate conditions. Drawing on data from human communities past and present, we review how features of climate variability—temporal autocorrelation, frequency, and severity—may predict which candidate climate change adaptations communities innovate or adopt. Using a case study of climate and remittances in Africa, we outline how researchers can characterize climate data by their autocorrelation, frequency, and severity, and then qualitatively compare these data to candidate adaptations. We include suggestions for how to involve communities in these explorations, from setting climate thresholds to identifying impactful hazards. By better understanding the relationship between climate variability and common solutions used by communities, researchers and policymakers can better support communities as they adapt to contemporary climate change.
    Date: 2023–02–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:osf:osfxxx:r382h&r=agr
  16. By: Thomas-Agnan, Christine; Simioni, Michel; Trinh, Thi-Huong
    Abstract: We compare several approaches to scalar-on-density regression. With a discrete point of view, the densities can be viewed as histograms whose frequency vectors belong to a simplex ${\cal S}^D$ and then classical compositional regression can be used. An alternative with a functional point of view is to consider density functions as infinite dimensional compositional objects, elements of the so-called Bayes space ${\cal B}^2$, and then compositional scalar-on-density regression can be performed. In the second approach, since the density covariate data is originally available as an histogram, these first need to be sent to ${\cal B}^2$ using a smoothing step performed by CB-splines smoothing. It is then interesting to investigate the potential advantage of the smooth approach with respect to the discrete one. We compare them through an application about the assessment of the impact of climate change on rice yield in Vietnam, where density covariates are the distributions of maximum daily temperatures during 30 years, from 1987 to 2016, in $63$ Vietnamese provinces. Additional covariates such as precipitation, regional dummies and a time trend are added to both models. Scenarios of climate change are modelled with perturbations of the initial density by a chosen change direction producing a shift of the densities towards higher temperatures. The impact on rice yield is then obtained in both models by computing a simple inner product, in ${\cal S}^D$ and respectively ${\cal B}^2, $ of the parameter of the density covariate with the change direction. The comparison shows that the smooth approach outperforms the discrete one by a better evaluation of the phenomenon scale which the discrete approach may fail to uncover.
    Keywords: Compositional Scalar-on-Density Regression;; Bayes Space;; Compositional Splines;; Climate Change;; Rice Yield;; Vietnam.
    JEL: C14 C16 C39 Q19 Q54
    Date: 2023–02–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tse:wpaper:127847&r=agr
  17. By: Gwen-Jirō Clochard (CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - ENSAI - Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Analyse de l'Information [Bruz] - X - École polytechnique - ENSAE Paris - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, University of Chicago); Aby Mbengue (UGB - Université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis Sénégal); Clément Mettling (IGH - Institut de génétique humaine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier, UMR ISEM - Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution de Montpellier - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - EPHE - École pratique des hautes études - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - Institut de recherche pour le développement [IRD] : UR226 - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier); Birane Diouf (UGB - Université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis Sénégal); Charlotte Faurie (UMR ISEM - Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution de Montpellier - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - EPHE - École pratique des hautes études - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - Institut de recherche pour le développement [IRD] : UR226 - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier); Omar Sene (UADB - Université Alioune Diop de Bambey); Emilie Chancerel (BioGeCo - Biodiversité, Gènes & Communautés - UB - Université de Bordeaux - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Erwan Guichoux (BioGeCo - Biodiversité, Gènes & Communautés - UB - Université de Bordeaux - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Guillaume Hollard (CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - ENSAI - Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Analyse de l'Information [Bruz] - X - École polytechnique - ENSAE Paris - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Michel Raymond (UMR ISEM - Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution de Montpellier - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - EPHE - École pratique des hautes études - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - Institut de recherche pour le développement [IRD] : UR226 - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier); Marc Willinger (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: It has been shown that living in risky environments, as well as having a risky occupation, can moderate risk-tolerance. Despite the involvement of dopamine in the expectation of reward described by neurobiologists, a GWAS study was not able to demonstrate a genetic contribution of genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway in risk attitudes and gene candidate studies gave contrasting results. We test the possibility that a genetic effect of the DRD4-7R allele in risk-taking behavior could be modulated by environmental factors. We show that the increase in risk-tolerance due to the 7R allele is independent of the environmental risk in two populations in Northern Senegal, one of which is exposed to a very high risk due to dangerous fishing.
    Keywords: Local adaptation, dopamine receptor, population genetics, economic games, behaviour
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03954770&r=agr
  18. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Users can download time series food price data, and build graphs and tables for over 20 different food crops at our food price database webpage: https://www.ifpri.org/project/freshfood-price-analysis-papua-newguinea. The average (nominal) price of staple foods in Port Moresby was 22 percent less (in nominal terms) in the 4th quarter of 2022 compared to quarter 4 of 2021. The 2022 quarter 4 price of sweet potato and taro in Kokopo was 22 percent greater compared to the same quarter in 2021. In addition green leafy vegetables price increased, in part due to unseasonably dry weather in East New Britain. Despite a rising global food price trend in 2022 as a result of the Russia-Ukraine crisis, increasing fuel prices, and weather stress, the price of imported rice in PNG remains relatively stable, with an average annual (nominal) price variation of 10 percent across 4 markets. In December 2022 a kilo of rice (Roots rice) cost 4.03 PGK/kg, compared to 5.07 PGK/kg in Port Moresby.
    Keywords: PAPUA NEW GUINEA, OCEANIA, prices, food prices, markets, sweet potatoes, taro, leaf vegetables, inflation
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:pngfpb:january2023&r=agr
  19. By: Wirania Swasty (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia Author-2-Name: Muhizam Mustafa Author-2-Workplace-Name: Telkom University, Indonesia Author-3-Name: Author-3-Workplace-Name: Author-4-Name: Author-4-Workplace-Name: Author-5-Name: Author-5-Workplace-Name: Author-6-Name: Author-6-Workplace-Name: Author-7-Name: Author-7-Workplace-Name: Author-8-Name: Author-8-Workplace-Name:)
    Abstract: " Objective - systematically review the role of colors within branding and value creation in food packaging and offer a novelty overview related to brand identification and value creation. Methodology - The literature review is adopted by collecting data from three main databases addressing color and packaging in a food context. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) 2020 Protocols guidelines. This paper aims to benefit the knowledge by analyzing 37 eligible articles in thematic analysis using the software NVivo12. Finding - The main two themes identified are message communication and taste perception or expectation. Consumers evaluate color on food packaging and associate it with tasting or other communication. Consumers' buying decisions of food products should be informed by packaging color. Color on food packaging conveys product properties and can be applied to make a healthy product more appealing. The finding has shown that visual cues are more essential compared to informational cues if considering healthy and low-fat nutrients. Novelty - This paper shows the important contributions to the literature on food packaging color and emphasizes the multidisciplinary nature. It highlights the crucial theories, themes, and perspectives. Type of Paper - Review"
    Keywords: Color; Packaging; Food; Brand; Value; Systematic Review
    JEL: D02 M31
    Date: 2023–12–31
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:gtr:gatrjs:gjbssr630&r=agr
  20. By: Nicolas Pazos (University of Nottingham); Marta Favara (University of Oxford); Alan Sánchez (Grupo de Análisis para el Desarrollo (GRADE)); Douglas Scott (University of Oxford); Jere Behrman (University of Pennsylvania)
    Abstract: Global warming is changing precipitation patterns, harming communities strongly tied to agricultural production, particularly in low-and-middle income countries (LMICs). Whilst the long-term effects of being exposed to rainfall shocks early in life on school achievement tests are well-established, there is little population-based evidence from LMICs on the mechanisms through which these shocks operate. This paper analyses the effects of early exposure to rainfall shocks on four foundational cognitive skills (FCSs), including executive functions (EF) that have been found to be key predictors of educational success. These skills were measured via a series of tablet-based tasks administered in Peru as part of the Young Lives longitudinal study (YLS). We combine the YLS data with gridded data on monthly precipitation to generate monthly, community-level rainfall estimates. The key identification strategy relies on temporary climatic shocks being uncorrelated with other latent determinants of FCS development. Our results show significant negative effects of early life exposure to rainfall shocks on EF. We also find evidence of rainfall shocks decreasing households’ abilities to invest in human capital, which may affect both FCS and domain-specific test scores. Interestingly, social policies providing affected households with additional resources partially offset the effects of the rainfall shocks.
    Keywords: Skills formation, Human capital, Rainfall, Peru, Early childhood
    JEL: J24 Q54 I24 I14
    Date: 2022–02–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pen:papers:23-001&r=agr
  21. By: Ecker, Olivier; Alderman, Harold; Comstock, Andrew R.; Headey, Derek D.; Mahrt, Kristi; Pradesha, Angga
    Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in severe income losses, but little is known about its impacts on diets and nutritional adequacy, or the effectiveness of social protection interventions in mitigating dietary and nutritional impacts. We first assess the likely impacts of COVID-19 shocks in Bangladesh and Myanmar on poverty and food and nutrient consumption gaps. We then analyze the estimated mitigating effects of five hypothetical social protection interventions of a typical monetary value: (1) cash transfers; (2) in-kind transfers of common rice; (3) in-kind transfers of fortified rice enriched with multiple essential micronutrients; (4) vouchers for a diversified basket of rice and non-staple foods; and (5) food vouchers with fortified rice instead of common rice. The simulation results suggest modest effectiveness of the cash transfers for mitigating poverty increases and little effectiveness of all five transfers for preventing increasing food and nutrient consumption gaps among the poorest 40%. Rice fortification is, however, effective at closing key micronutrient consumption gaps and could be a suitable policy instrument for averting ‘hidden hunger’ during economic crises.
    Keywords: BANGLADESH; SOUTH ASIA; ASIA; MYANMAR; BURMA; SOUTHEAST ASIA; cash transfers; Coronavirus; coronavirus disease; Coronavirinae; COVID-19; food consumption; diet; nutrition; poverty; poverty alleviation; simulation; social protection; nutrient consumption gaps
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:2170&r=agr
  22. By: Eric Tromeur; Luc Doyen (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Violaine Tarizzo; L. Richard Little (CSIRO Ocean & Atmosphere, CSIRO); Sarah Jennings (UTAS - University of Tasmania [Hobart, Australia]); Olivier Thébaud (IFREMER - Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer)
    Date: 2021–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-03913035&r=agr
  23. By: Völker, Richard; Gruener, Sven
    Abstract: Social scientists are increasingly interested in information avoidance (IA)—the active decision to refrain from information. However, processing information on animal protection in German livestock systems has not been systematically studied before. We close this gap by conducting a web-based survey in Germany with a focus on abdicating responsibility as a potential predictor of IA. As suggested in psychology, we measure IA with the help of several items to reduce measurement error. In our study, both the “sense of responsibility for animal protection” and the “consciousness of animal protection issues” were negatively associated with IA. This contradicts previous studies (e.g., in medicine, food consumption) in which people avoid information that they expect to trigger negative emotions. Our results help to better understand possible market failures (e.g., asymmetric information, moral hazard) and indicate that providing people with more information may have the potential to further increase legal animal pro-tection standards.
    Date: 2023–02–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:osf:osfxxx:cgj6w&r=agr
  24. By: Winston P. Hovekamp; Katherine R. H. Wagner
    Abstract: This paper studies whether private adaptation to flood risk is economically efficient. We estimate the return to elevating houses, one of the most significant private defensive investments against flooding, using two decades of microdata on the universe of houses and flood damages in high-risk flood zones in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast United States. We find that undertaking adaptation is socially optimal in the highest risk areas over a house’s lifetime, but that individual homeowners may under-invest in flood protection because the benefits do not accrue over their average tenure. We identify conditions under which adaptation yields the highest returns.
    JEL: H54 Q54 Q58
    Date: 2023
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_10243&r=agr
  25. By: Mr. Serhan Cevik
    Abstract: This paper investigates the connection between climate change and energy security in Europe and provides empirical evidence that these issues are the two faces of the same coin. Using a panel of 39 countries in Europe over the period 1980–2019, the empirical analysis presented in this paper indicates that increasing the share of nuclear, renewables, and other non-hydrocarbon energy and improving energy efficiency could lead to a significant reduction in carbon emissions and improve energy security throughout Europe. Accordingly, policies and reforms aimed at shifting away from hydrocarbons and increasing energy efficiency in distribution and consumption are key to mitigating climate change, reducing energy dependence, and minimizing exposure to energy price volatility.
    Keywords: Climate change; energy security; carbon emissions; energy efficiency; Europe; transition economies; mitigating climate change; energy dependence; climate change adaptation; financing climate change mitigation; Greenhouse gas emissions; Energy conservation; Carbon tax; Global; Baltics
    Date: 2022–09–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:imf:imfwpa:2022/174&r=agr
  26. By: Nonso Ewurum; Kenechi Ifeanacho; Okwuchi Juliet Akalemeaku; Ezinne Onyekwelu
    Abstract: Empiricism on institutional land administration in developing countries have historically and currently conveyed an anthology of process delays, database mismanagement, titling irregularities and data falsification encumbrances to real estate investment. In spite of these lingering information management deficiencies, a common argument does appear in extant research that the plethora of scholarly and cross-industry demonstrations of blockchain data management and security capacities and propensities are seemingly overlooked by land information managers in this region, especially in the focus area of Sub-Saharan Africa. The paper offers an instantiation for the validation of the Dynamic Capabilities Theory as predictor for blockchain-driven re-engineering of land information management processes in the area. The objectives of the study were to identify encumbrances of blockchain adoption in land information management in the study area, and to examine idiosyncratic dynamic capabilities which can be deployed in their attenuation. The methodology was a systematic review of related indexed studies which premised the theorizing of nexuses between idiosyncratic dynamic capabilities and organizational performance hindrances. From the findings of the study, pathways to a research agenda were established using 5 testable propositions for land information management. The paper promotes a theoretical framework for better understanding of the prospects of dynamic capabilities theory in engendering an improved and sustainable land information management system in the developing countries.
    Keywords: Blockchain technology; Disruptive technologies; Dynamic capabilities theory; Land information management system
    JEL: R3
    Date: 2022–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arz:wpaper:2022_136&r=agr
  27. By: Fatemeh Vafaie; Hilde Remøy
    Abstract: Purpose – “The revitalisation of the Deliplein has enabled Katendrecht to shed its longstanding reputation as one of the worst districts in Rotterdam. It is now one of the most sought-after neighbourhoods in the city”. The Fenix food factory is located near Deliplein in the Katendrecht neighbourhood, and plays an essential role for the success of this regeneration project. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the success of the adaptive reuse project of the Fenix food factory, as part of a case study research of several adaptive reuse projects in the Netherlands. Accordingly, this paper seeks to answer the following questions: What are the factors that lead to the success of adaptive reuse projects? How can the success factors of adaptive reuse be implemented in the Dutch redevelopment practice?Design Methodology/approach – The case study approach has been adopted to evaluate the success factors for adaptive reuse of heritage real estate as found through previous literature review. As part of the case study, interviews are held with the stakeholders of Fenix Food Factory, for better understanding the overall framework of the project, such as stakeholder partnerships, reuse regulations and limitations determined by the municipality, financial and social viability. The case study material furthermore includes project documentation and written sources about the project. Findings – The findings show how success factors are applied in the decision making process of adaptive reuse projects. Furthermore, new factors that are not found in existing literature but are considered effective for the success of the Fenix food factory will be added to the body of knowledge on this topic. Originality/value- This research contributes to providing more comprehensive data as input for decision making models for successful adaptive reuse projects. This study reviews the classification of success factors that was revealed in previous studies. The final result of this study will contribute to develop knowledge for the management of heritage real estate.
    Keywords: Adaptive Reuse; case study; Industrial heritage real estate; The Netherlands
    JEL: R3
    Date: 2022–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arz:wpaper:2022_214&r=agr

This nep-agr issue is ©2023 by Angelo Zago. It is provided as is without any express or implied warranty. It may be freely redistributed in whole or in part for any purpose. If distributed in part, please include this notice.
General information on the NEP project can be found at http://nep.repec.org. For comments please write to the director of NEP, Marco Novarese at <director@nep.repec.org>. Put “NEP” in the subject, otherwise your mail may be rejected.
NEP’s infrastructure is sponsored by the School of Economics and Finance of Massey University in New Zealand.