nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2022‒09‒05
83 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. American Agriculture, Water Resources, and Climate Change By Gary D. Libecap; Ariel Dinar
  2. Does Agricultural Innovation Accelerate Agricultural Export Growth? By Jeong, Hyunju; Suh, Dong Hee
  3. Competition and Price Transmission along Supply Chains of Perishable Agricultural Commodities By Cui, Xiurui; Guan, Zhengfei
  4. Five-Year Plans and Chinese Provincial Agricultural Productivity By Tian, Yongxia; Shaik, Saleem
  5. Economic effects of plant-based milk introduction on consumers and dairy industry By Lee, Sangwon; Sumner, Daniel A.
  6. Tenure Status and Land Investment in South Korea By Choi, Jiseon; Jodlowski, Margaret C.
  7. Dairy States Have More Women Dairy Farm Operators By Fraysse, Elizabeth A.; Sumner, Daniel A.
  8. The Impact of Agricultural Support and Protection Subsidies on Grain Production in China By Fan, Pengfei; Mishra, Ashok K.
  9. Minnesota beginning dairy farmers financial performance and outlook By Weir, Rebecca; Hadrich, Joleen C.
  10. The Impacts of Food Safety Certification on Producers’ Safety Outcomes By Hu, Lijiao; Zheng, Yuqing
  11. Does Herbicide Drift Exacerbate Input Supplier Concentration in the Market for U.S. Soybean Seed? By McCarty, Tanner; Young, Jeffrey S.
  12. Assessing the Role of Estates on Smallholder Household Labor Allocation in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of Malawi By Edobor, Edeoba W.
  13. Sources of Bias in USDA International Baseline Projections By Chandio, Rabail; Katchova, Ani
  14. Diet costs by level of food processing in 177 countries, 2011 and 2017 By Martinez, Elena M.; Masters, William A.
  15. Multi-horizon Forecasts of Agricultural Commodity Prices using Deep Learning By Bora, Siddhartha S.; Katchova, Ani
  16. LABOR DYNAMICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTION IN THE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES SECTORS By Sun, Zhaochen; Goodwin, Barry K.
  17. The Impact of COVID-19 and Associated Policy Responses on Global Food Security By Edward Balistreri (UNL); Felix Baquedano (USDA ERS); John Beghin (UNL)
  18. Information Rigidities in USDA Forecasts By Goyal, Raghav; Adjemian, Michael K.
  19. Are Agricultural Corporations More Efficient Than Peasant Households in Agricultural Production: Evidence from regional panel data in Japan By Dong, Qi
  20. Market Power in the U.S. Dairy Industry By Bolotova, Yuliya V.
  21. Engaging Information Technology in Farmland Rental Market: An Empirical Study from Rural China By Zou, Baoling; Mishra, Ashok K.
  22. A nonlinear asymmetric model of lumber price transmission By Davis, James D.; Adjemian, Michael K.
  23. The evolution of symbiotic innovation, water, and agricultural supply chains By Zilberman, David; Huang, Alice; Reardon, Thomas A.
  24. The Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Household Averting Expenditure By Liu, Yanan; Klaiber, Allen
  25. Food System Summit Country Transformation Pathways: What we learned and what is next? By Fabi, Carola; Gerits, Hannah; Ospina, Christian A. Mongeau; Cullen, Maximo Torero
  26. When quality management helps agri-food firms to export By Emlinger, Charlotte; Latouche, Karine
  27. Decomposing the GMO regulation impact on bilateral trade By Hedoui, Mohamed Amine; Beghin, John C.
  28. Taste Renaissance, Tax Reform, and Industrial Organization of the Beer Industry By Luckstead,, Jeff; Devadoss, Stephen
  29. Unit Pricing Regulation and Non-Price Responses of Retailers: Evidence from the U.S. Yogurt Market By Qin, Fei; Ma, Meilin
  30. The Role of USDA Reports on Extreme Volatility Coexceedances: An Application to the Soybean Complex By Yang, Yao; Karali, Berna
  31. Gender, tenure security, and landscape governance: Synthesis of studies of PIM’s Governance of Natural Resources Flagship Program, 2013–2020 By Kristjanson, Patricia
  32. An Economic Analysis of a “Portion Size Reduction” Policy By Hosni, Hanin; Giannakas, Konstantinos
  33. Citrus Growers’ Willingness to Pay and Perceptions of Cover Crops By Chakravarty, Shourish; Wade, Tara
  34. Farmers’ perceptions of water management in Jemna oasis, Southern Tunisia By Stefano Farolfi; Emmanuelle Lavaine; Sylvie Morardet; Oumaima Lfakir; Faten Khamassi; Marc Willinger
  35. The organic food price premium and its susceptibility to news media coverage: Evidence from the U.S. milk industry By Gayle, Philip; Wang, Jin; Fang, Shengnan
  36. Climate adaptation and technical efficiency of rice production in Central China By Liu, Yong; Ruiz-Menjivar, Jorge
  37. Produce Tracing from Farm to Wholesale and Food Safety in the U.S. By Horeh, Marziyeh Bahalou; Elbakidze, Levan
  38. Household Food Waste, Food Shopping Behavior and Time Use By Yenerall, Jackie; Jensen, Kimberly L.
  39. Agricultural Labor and Bargaining Power By Richards, Timothy J.; Rutledge, Zachariah
  40. Retail Food Price Vulnerability to Extreme Weather Events By Venkat, Aishwarya; Masters, William A.
  41. Beef Production and Climate Change By Etumnu, Chinoso E.; Wang, Tong; Kreuter, Urs; Davis, Christopher; Cheye, Stephen
  42. Evaluating Agricultural Baselines: Projection Revisions and Information Rigidity By Ding, Kexin; Katchova, Ani
  43. Localized Urbanization and Agricultural Industrialization at the Micro-Scale By Dong, Zekuan; Schaefer, K. Aleks
  44. Irrigation-as-a-service for smallholder farmers By Lal, Ishani; Brozovic, Nick
  45. The joint effects of financial literacy and women’s empowerment training, and financial inclusion on food security: Evidence from Ghana By Nyanzu, Frederick
  46. The Impact of Local Heat Extremes on the Performance of Dairy Processing Firms in Europe By Dalhaus, Tobias; Zhang, Yujie
  47. Assessment of Calories Purchased After Calorie Labeling of Prepared Foods in a Large Supermarket Chain By Joshua Petimar; Anna H. Grummon; Fang Zhang; Steven L. Gortmaker; Alyssa J. Moran; Michele Polacsek; Eric B. Rimm; Christina A. Roberto; Anjali Rao; Lauren P. Cleveland; Denise Simon; Rebecca L. Franckle; Sue Till; Julie Greene; Jason P. Block
  48. Socioeconomic impacts of land restoration in agriculture: A systematic review By Malan, Mandy; Berkhout, Ezra; Duchoslav, Jan; Voors, Maarten; van der Esch, Stefan
  49. The nutritional and environmental impacts of food consumption: Evidence from increasing gasoline prices. By Berland, Ondine
  50. The impact of climate change on economic output in Chile: past and future By Karla Hernández; Carlos Madeira
  51. A Dynamic Analysis of Food Waste: Implications for Waste Management of Local Government By Park, Jinseon; Suh, Dong Hee
  52. Overseas Impact of USDA Reports: Evidence from Chinese Soybean Complex Futures By Hu, Zhepeng; Mallory, Mindy L.
  53. Aging out of Food Security By Berning, Joshua P.; Wilde, Parke E.
  54. Nonlinear Aspects of Integration of the US Corn Market By Choe, Kyoungin; Goodwin, Barry K.
  55. Ex-Post Evaluation of The Algerian SWRO Desalination PPP Program By Mikhail Miklyaev; Glenn P. Jenkins; Precious P. Adeshina
  56. Valuing mangrove conservation attributes in Red River Delta, Vietnam: a choice experiment approach By Thanh Viet Nguyen; Michel Simioni; Hung Trung Vo
  57. Frost exposure can predict national apple prices By Dalhaus, Tobias; Oostrom, Edith Van
  58. Measuring The Impact of Transaction Costs on Profitability of Farmers: Empirical Evidence from India By Vishnu, Kedar; Rai, Ruchika
  59. The UN Food Systems Summit 2021: Lessons of the Gender and Finance Levers By Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio; McNamara, Brian; Njuki, Jemimah; Swinnen, Johan; Vos, Rob
  60. The COVID-19 Shock and Dynamics of Price Adjustment in the U.S. Beef Sector By Erol, Erdal; Saghaian, Sayed H.
  61. A meta-analysis of the total economic impact of climate change By Richard S. J. Tol
  62. Mitigating Shocks Through Credit Market: Evidence from Rural Bangladesh By Ijaz, Arusha; Yu, Jisang
  63. The Effect of Cross-Category Learning on Product Innovation and Market Expansion of Plant-Based Food By Zhou, Pei; Liu, Yizao
  64. Are Agro-clusters Pro-Poor? Evidence from Ethiopia By Tabe-Ojong, Jr., Martin Paul; Godana, Guyo
  65. The economic determinants of Venezuela’s hunger crisis By Rodriguez, Francisco
  66. Exploring the Impact of Agricultural Investment on Economic Growth in France By Bakari, Sayef; El Weriemmi, Malek
  67. Drivers of the Labor Share Decline in U.S. Food Manufacturing By Lopez, Rigoberto A.; Li, Mengjie
  68. Comparative Analysis of the Softwood Lumber Agreement (2006) and the 2017 Countervailing and Anti-dumping Duties By Robinson,, John W.
  69. Examining the Carbon Emission Technical Efficiency: A Stochastic Frontier Approach By Kang, Hyonyong; Suh, Dong Hee
  70. Climate Change and Financial Policy: A Literature Review By Benjamin Dennis
  71. Comparison of Agricultural Baseline Projections for the United States, the European Union, and China By Fang, Xiaoyi; Katchova, Ani
  72. Does climate change news inform flood insurance take? By Xu, Yilan; Huang, Yi
  73. Productivity Growth from Genetic Improvement: Estimates from Soybean Experiment Station Data By Hutchins, Jared P.; Irwin, Scott H.
  74. Assessing the Affordability of Nutrient-Adequate Diets By Kate R. Schneider; Luc Christiaensen; Patrick Webb; William A. Masters
  75. Good Co-ops, Bad Co-ops : Financing Cooperatives in Asymmetric Information By Cadot, Julien; Féral, Arnaud
  76. Fish to fight: does catching more fish increase conflicts in Indonesia? By Lu, Yifan; Yamazaki, Satoshi
  77. Revisiting the Solow-Swan model of income convergence in the context of coffee producing and re-exporting countries in the world By Kadigi, Reuben M.J.; Robinson, Elizabeth; Szabo, Sylvia; Kangile, Joseph; Mgeni, Charles P.; De Maria, Marcello; Tsusaka, Takuji; Nhau, Brighton
  78. Missing Markets for Some: Testing for Intra-Household Separability By Posey, Sean; Dorfman, Jeffrey H.
  79. Increasing minimum wages and farmers’ hiring decisions By Huang, Kuan-Ming; Guan, Zhengfei
  80. Estimating Consumer Segments and Choices from Limited Information: The Application of Machine Learning Methods By Qin, Fei; Wu, Steven Y.
  81. Determinants of Community & Agricultural Bank Consolidations: A Rare Event Study By Kim, Kevin N.; Katchova, Ani
  82. Chinese Trade Competition and Mexican Farm Labor Supply By Rutledge, Zachariah; Mayorga, Joaquin
  83. The Effect of Logo Visibility on Brand Recognition and Willingness to Pay By Gabrielyan, Gnel; Just, David R.

  1. By: Gary D. Libecap; Ariel Dinar
    Abstract: This paper highlights the role of agriculture in the American economy and society over time and points to farmer historical and contemporary responses to varying climatic conditions. It indicates the importance of water as an input to agricultural production and identifies possible impacts of climate change on access to water. It then summarizes a set of eleven papers from an NBER research project on water, climate change, and the agricultural sector.
    JEL: N5 Q1 Q15
    Date: 2022–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:30290&r=
  2. By: Jeong, Hyunju; Suh, Dong Hee
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322123&r=
  3. By: Cui, Xiurui; Guan, Zhengfei
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322505&r=
  4. By: Tian, Yongxia; Shaik, Saleem
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322436&r=
  5. By: Lee, Sangwon; Sumner, Daniel A.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322573&r=
  6. By: Choi, Jiseon; Jodlowski, Margaret C.
    Keywords: International Development, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322476&r=
  7. By: Fraysse, Elizabeth A.; Sumner, Daniel A.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322499&r=
  8. By: Fan, Pengfei; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322474&r=
  9. By: Weir, Rebecca; Hadrich, Joleen C.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322106&r=
  10. By: Hu, Lijiao; Zheng, Yuqing
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322330&r=
  11. By: McCarty, Tanner; Young, Jeffrey S.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322230&r=
  12. By: Edobor, Edeoba W.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322345&r=
  13. By: Chandio, Rabail; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322469&r=
  14. By: Martinez, Elena M.; Masters, William A.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural Finance, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322288&r=
  15. By: Bora, Siddhartha S.; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322557&r=
  16. By: Sun, Zhaochen; Goodwin, Barry K.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322333&r=
  17. By: Edward Balistreri (UNL); Felix Baquedano (USDA ERS); John Beghin (UNL)
    Abstract: We analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated policy responses on the global economy and food security in 80 low- and middle-income countries. We use a global economy-wide model with detailed disaggregation of agricultural and food sectors and develop a business as usual baseline for 2020 and 2021 called “But-for-COVID” (BfC). We then shock the model with aggregate income shocks derived from the IMF World Economic Outlook for 2020 and 2021. We impose total-factor productivity losses in key sectors as well as consumption decreases induced by social distancing. The resulting shocks in prices and incomes from the CGE model simulations are fed into the USDA-ERS International Food Security Assessment model to derive the impact of the pandemic on food security in these 80 countries. The main effect of the pandemic was to exacerbate the existing declining trend in food security. Food insecurity increases considerably in countries in Asia through income shocks rather than prices effects. We also review trade policies that were put in place to restrict imports and exports of food, and we evaluate their potential for further disruption of markets focusing on the food-security implications.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2022–08–21
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nbaesp:323973&r=
  18. By: Goyal, Raghav; Adjemian, Michael K.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322339&r=
  19. By: Dong, Qi
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322067&r=
  20. By: Bolotova, Yuliya V.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322754&r=
  21. By: Zou, Baoling; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Productivity Analysis, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322265&r=
  22. By: Davis, James D.; Adjemian, Michael K.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322608&r=
  23. By: Zilberman, David; Huang, Alice; Reardon, Thomas A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322753&r=
  24. By: Liu, Yanan; Klaiber, Allen
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322117&r=
  25. By: Fabi, Carola; Gerits, Hannah; Ospina, Christian A. Mongeau; Cullen, Maximo Torero
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2022–08–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322752&r=
  26. By: Emlinger, Charlotte; Latouche, Karine
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322407&r=
  27. By: Hedoui, Mohamed Amine; Beghin, John C.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322156&r=
  28. By: Luckstead,, Jeff; Devadoss, Stephen
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322138&r=
  29. By: Qin, Fei; Ma, Meilin
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322243&r=
  30. By: Yang, Yao; Karali, Berna
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322104&r=
  31. By: Kristjanson, Patricia
    Abstract: Gender relations shape women’s and men’s identities, norms, rules, and responsibilities. They influence people’s access to, use, and management of land and other natural resources, including ownership, tenure, and user rights to land and forests. A substantial body of research on these issues comes from the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM), through its Flagship 5 research theme. Flagship 5 focused on gender and social inclusion in relation to land and natural resource tenure and to landscape governance, and analyzed how tenure security affects sustainable management of land, water, fish stocks, and forests. This Food Policy Report reviews the scientific contributions from Flagship 5 to the broader wealth of related literature, including key lessons about gender from these studies with respect to outcomes and impacts on natural resource management, food security, and poverty alleviation.
    Keywords: WORLD; gender; tenure; tenure security; governance; landscape; land governance; natural resources; women; gender norms
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:fprepo:136299&r=
  32. By: Hosni, Hanin; Giannakas, Konstantinos
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322331&r=
  33. By: Chakravarty, Shourish; Wade, Tara
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322606&r=
  34. By: Stefano Farolfi (UMR G-EAU - Gestion de l'Eau, Acteurs, Usages - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - AgroParisTech - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Cirad-ES - Département Environnements et Sociétés - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement); Emmanuelle Lavaine (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier); Sylvie Morardet (UMR G-EAU - Gestion de l'Eau, Acteurs, Usages - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - AgroParisTech - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Oumaima Lfakir (UMR G-EAU - Gestion de l'Eau, Acteurs, Usages - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - AgroParisTech - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Faten Khamassi (Institut National Agronomique de Tunis (TUNISIE)); Marc Willinger (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - UM - Université de Montpellier)
    Abstract: Groundwater resources are a crucial driver of development. Since the 1970s, the expansion of irrigated land on the margins of the existing 'traditional' oases has been encouraged by the Tunisian authorities to enhance local development. As a result, oases in Southern Tunisia are currently facing sustainability concerns. This situation requires alternative water management approaches, in which local actors collaborate and contribute to the design of new rules. To understand Tunisian oasis farmers' perceptions of water rules and public organisations, in 2021, we conducted an online survey in Jemna, an oasis in the Kebili region in Southern Tunisia. The picture that emerged from the online survey is that farmers in extension areas have distinctive characteristics but also similarities with farmers in the traditional oasis. Both types of farmers mainly cultivate date palm (monoculture), and, like farmers in the extensions, many farmers in the traditional oasis have a private borehole. All farmers in the Jemna oasis clearly perceive the limited availability and poor quality of the groundwater resource. However, they do not believe these problems cause conflict among farmers. They consider that, to solve possible conflicts and to ensure better water management in the oasis, collaboration among farmers is more effective than changes to rules issued by existing organisations. These preliminary results, if confirmed, can have important policy implications, as the farmers' perceptions of water rules and organisations, as well as farmers' willingness to collaborate, are crucial for a possible new approach to water management in the oasis.
    Keywords: Farmers' perceptions,Public organisations,Rules,Tunisia
    Date: 2022–07–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03726258&r=
  35. By: Gayle, Philip; Wang, Jin; Fang, Shengnan
    Abstract: This paper investigates the extent to which media coverage on organic dairy issues influences consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for the organic attribute of milk. We find that news with contents most often viewed as negative toward organic dairy are more powerful in decreasing consumers’ WTP for the organic attribute of milk compared to the positive WTP impact of news articles with contents most often viewed as positive toward organic dairy. Interestingly, consumers' increasing exposure to organic dairy news that even take a neutral stance on the organic attribute also increases their WTP for the organic attribute.
    Keywords: Organic Food; Organic Price Premium; Newspaper Coverage; Milk Industry
    JEL: D10 L13 L15 L82 M30 Q00
    Date: 2022–07–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:113924&r=
  36. By: Liu, Yong; Ruiz-Menjivar, Jorge
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Community/Rural/Urban Development, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322521&r=
  37. By: Horeh, Marziyeh Bahalou; Elbakidze, Levan
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322357&r=
  38. By: Yenerall, Jackie; Jensen, Kimberly L.
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322304&r=
  39. By: Richards, Timothy J.; Rutledge, Zachariah
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322101&r=
  40. By: Venkat, Aishwarya; Masters, William A.
    Keywords: International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322603&r=
  41. By: Etumnu, Chinoso E.; Wang, Tong; Kreuter, Urs; Davis, Christopher; Cheye, Stephen
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:323980&r=
  42. By: Ding, Kexin; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Marketing, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322276&r=
  43. By: Dong, Zekuan; Schaefer, K. Aleks
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Production Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322264&r=
  44. By: Lal, Ishani; Brozovic, Nick
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322274&r=
  45. By: Nyanzu, Frederick
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322160&r=
  46. By: Dalhaus, Tobias; Zhang, Yujie
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural Finance, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322126&r=
  47. By: Joshua Petimar; Anna H. Grummon; Fang Zhang; Steven L. Gortmaker; Alyssa J. Moran; Michele Polacsek; Eric B. Rimm; Christina A. Roberto; Anjali Rao; Lauren P. Cleveland; Denise Simon; Rebecca L. Franckle; Sue Till; Julie Greene; Jason P. Block
    Abstract: Calorie labels for prepared (i.e., ready-to-eat) foods are required in large chain food establishments in the US. Large evaluations in restaurants suggest small declines in purchases of prepared foods after labeling.
    Keywords: calories, calorie labeling, supermarket, nutrition
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:mpr:mprres:a9bc59311f724f368cedb37605653827&r=
  48. By: Malan, Mandy; Berkhout, Ezra; Duchoslav, Jan; Voors, Maarten; van der Esch, Stefan
    Abstract: At the onset of the United Nations' decade of ecosystem restoration, lessons from well-designed impact evaluations on land restoration programs are crucial for improving policymaking. This study presents findings from a systematic review of research on the socioeconomic impact of such interventions, namely within agroforestry, conservation agriculture, integrated soil fertility management and soil and water conservation. We focus on identifying rigorous impact assessments, and after careful methodological assessment select only 29 relevant publications. We identify three key knowledge gaps. First, we retained no studies on agroforestry, suggesting a need for impact evaluations in this domain. Second, most studies look solely at farm-level outcomes instead of socioeconomic outcomes. Third, two-thirds of studies report positive on farm- or socioeconomic outcomes, but impact does not appear ubiquitous and may emerge under certain circumstances only. Overall, we conclude that there is a lack of well-designed impact assessments in this field. Promises on land restoration leading to improvements in the socioeconomic situation of households cannot yet be backed up by existing studies and it remains unclear which interventions work under which conditions.
    Keywords: Land restoration,systematic review,impact evaluation,rural development
    JEL: O13 O33 Q15 Q24 Q32
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:rwirep:951&r=
  49. By: Berland, Ondine
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Environmental Economics and Policy, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322433&r=
  50. By: Karla Hernández; Carlos Madeira
    Abstract: We study the impact of some weather variables (precipitation and temperatures) on GDP by using a region-industry panel data for Chile over the period 1985-2017. We find no effect of precipitation changes on GDP, but the results confirm a negative impact of higher summer temperatures on Agriculture-Silviculture and Fishing. An increase of one Celsius degree in January implies a 3% and 12% GDP reduction in Agriculture and Fishing, respectively, plus a negative effect on Construction, Electricity, Gas, and Water. Substantial uncertainty can be argued around these results due to the unavailability of region-industry GDP at a quarterly or monthly frequency and the assumption of fixed-coefficients over time. Stress test exercises for 2050 and 2100 that use all the industry coefficients estimated from our model or from an USA model imply a small effect of climate change on the overall Chilean GDP relative to a scenario without further climate change. However, these results should be taken with caution due to the overall fitness of the model. Indeed, under some parameter settings of the model, our stress test implies that the Chilean GDP would fall between -14.8% and -9% in 2050 and between -29.6% and -16.8% in 2100 relative to a scenario without further climate change. t further climate change. We also review several studies for the future impact of climate change during the 21st century. Some studies suggest that Chile is likely to suffer mild effects in terms of GDP growth, labor productivity and mortality costs. However, the studies of Kahn et al. (2019), Kalkuhl and Wenz (2020) and Swiss Re (2021) predict that Chile may suffer significant GDP costs due to the adaptation difficulties in a warmer weather. Furthermore, several studies find that Chile is facing non-GDP related problems from climate change, such as air pollution, drought, water stress, migration and changes in land classification.
    Date: 2021–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:chb:bcchwp:933&r=
  51. By: Park, Jinseon; Suh, Dong Hee
    Keywords: Marketing, Consumer/Household Economics, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322119&r=
  52. By: Hu, Zhepeng; Mallory, Mindy L.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322090&r=
  53. By: Berning, Joshua P.; Wilde, Parke E.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322387&r=
  54. By: Choe, Kyoungin; Goodwin, Barry K.
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, International Relations/Trade, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322158&r=
  55. By: Mikhail Miklyaev (Department of Economics, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6 and Cambridge Resources International Inc.); Glenn P. Jenkins (Department of Economics, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L3N6 and Cambridge Resources International Inc.); Precious P. Adeshina (Cambridge Resources International Inc.)
    Abstract: The ever-increasing population and a decrease in available fresh water resources have resulted in continued water scarcity globally. The situation is worse in certain areas than others, especially in countries and regions with limited water resources. Being a desert country that lacks many rivers and other natural water resources together with continuous increase in population, Algeria faces significant challenges in accessing fresh water. The gap in the demand and supply of water affects households and agriculture, which significantly depends on irrigation for successful operations. The impact of the water supply deficit is being felt across the country and in major cities, such as Algiers and Oran. Although Algeria has employed desalination technology to meet the water shortage challenge in the past, most of the water produced using the technology has only been able to meet the water needs in the oil and steel industries. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of some of these large-scale investments and assess them in light of their effectiveness in teams of their cost and their ability to meet the water supply shortages in Algeria.
    Keywords: Algeria, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Water Desalination, Public Private Partnership (PPP), Water Shortage
    JEL: D61 I38 L95 O55 Q25
    Date: 2022–08–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:qed:dpaper:4595&r=
  56. By: Thanh Viet Nguyen (University of Akureyri); Michel Simioni (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Hung Trung Vo (Thu Dau Mot University - Partenaires INRAE)
    Abstract: The study aims at valuing mangrove ecosystem services in Xuan Thuy National Park, Red River Delta, Vietnam. A discrete choice experiment was employed to elicit household willingness to pay (WTP) for a community project to protect mangroves against climate change. A conditional logit model and a random parameter logit model were estimated to identify the relationships between WTP and the different attributes of the mangrove conservation project. The results suggested that local households exhibited strong preferences for mangrove coverage area and storm prevention capacity whereas biodiversity benefits were not greatly perceived by most respondents. High level of heterogeneity in household preferences was found for the high mangrove coverage, and high management level of biodiversity. Furthermore, marginal household WTPs were computed given a change in each attribute level. Hence, the findings will aid in the development of a comprehensive payment for mangrove preservation policy in Vietnam.
    Keywords: Mangrove preservation,Environmental services valuation,Discrete choice experiment,Xuan Thuy National Park,Vietnam
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03708264&r=
  57. By: Dalhaus, Tobias; Oostrom, Edith Van
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322124&r=
  58. By: Vishnu, Kedar; Rai, Ruchika
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322593&r=
  59. By: Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio; McNamara, Brian; Njuki, Jemimah; Swinnen, Johan; Vos, Rob
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322751&r=
  60. By: Erol, Erdal; Saghaian, Sayed H.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322057&r=
  61. By: Richard S. J. Tol
    Abstract: Earlier meta-analyses of the economic impact of climate change are updated with more data, with three new results: (1) The central estimate of the economic impact of global warming is always negative. (2) The confidence interval about the estimates is much wider. (3) Elicitation methods are most pessimistic, econometric studies most optimistic. Two previous results remain: (4) The uncertainty about the impact is skewed towards negative surprises. (5) Poorer countries are much more vulnerable than richer ones. A meta-analysis of the impact of weather shocks reveals that studies, which relate economic growth to temperature levels, cannot agree on the sign of the impact whereas studies, which make economic growth a function of temperature change, differ an order of magnitude in effect size, but do agree on the sign. The former studies posit that climate change has a permanent effect on economic growth, the latter that the impact is transient. The impact on economic growth implied by studies of the impact of climate change is close to the growth impact estimated as a function of weather shocks.
    Date: 2022–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2207.12199&r=
  62. By: Ijaz, Arusha; Yu, Jisang
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, International Development, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322190&r=
  63. By: Zhou, Pei; Liu, Yizao
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322137&r=
  64. By: Tabe-Ojong, Jr., Martin Paul; Godana, Guyo
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, International Development, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322432&r=
  65. By: Rodriguez, Francisco
    Abstract: This paper argues that Venezuela’s hunger crisis was caused by the collapse of the country’s import capacity. I show evidence supporting the hypothesis that the key driver of the decrease in caloric intake was the decline of more than nine-tenths in oil revenues, which sparked an economic contraction and forced the economy to undertake massive cuts in imports of food and agricultural inputs. Econometric estimates using cross-national panel data show that Venezuela’s performance in health and nutrition indicators is in line with, and in many cases significantly better, than what we should expect given the magnitude of its contraction in per capita incomes over the past two decades.
    Keywords: Venezuela; Food policies; Economic crises
    JEL: I15 I38 O54
    Date: 2022–06–23
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:113669&r=
  66. By: Bakari, Sayef; El Weriemmi, Malek
    Abstract: According to the World Bank (2021), agriculture is the main source of income for 80% of the world's poor. This sector therefore plays a key role in reducing poverty, increasing incomes, and improving food security. The aim of this paper is to study the impact of agricultural investment on economic growth in France. To attempt our goal, annual data was collected during the period 1978 – 2020 and was estimated by ARDL model. Empirical results indicate that in the long run and in the short run agricultural investment has a positive impact on France’s economic growth. These results argue that investments in the agricultural sector are an essential determinant of economic growth in France and motivate the need to adopt sound policies to further strengthen this sector.
    Keywords: Agricultural Investment, Economic Growth, Cointegration, ARDL Model, France.
    JEL: O47 O52 Q10 Q18
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:113970&r=
  67. By: Lopez, Rigoberto A.; Li, Mengjie
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322092&r=
  68. By: Robinson,, John W.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322597&r=
  69. By: Kang, Hyonyong; Suh, Dong Hee
    Keywords: Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322121&r=
  70. By: Benjamin Dennis
    Abstract: This article reviews the rapidly proliferating economic literature on climate change and financial policy. We find: (1) enduring challenges in estimating the statistical properties of a changed climate; (2) emerging evidence of financial markets pricing in climate-related risks; and (3) a range of significant institutional distortions preventing such pricing from being complete. Finally, we argue that geographic regions may be an especially fruitful unit of analysis for understanding the financial impact of climate change.
    Keywords: Climate change; Climate-finance; Climate-related risk
    JEL: G20 Q54 G10
    Date: 2022–07–29
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2022-48&r=
  71. By: Fang, Xiaoyi; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322358&r=
  72. By: Xu, Yilan; Huang, Yi
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322178&r=
  73. By: Hutchins, Jared P.; Irwin, Scott H.
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Agribusiness, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322202&r=
  74. By: Kate R. Schneider; Luc Christiaensen; Patrick Webb; William A. Masters
    Abstract: The cost and affordability of least-cost healthy diets by time and place are increasingly used as a proxy for access to nutrient-adequate diets. Recent work has focused on the nutrient requirements of individuals, although most food and anti-poverty programs target whole households. This raises the question of how the cost of a nutrient-adequate diet can be measured for an entire household. This study identifies upper and lower bounds on the feasibility, cost, and affordability of meeting all household members' nutrient requirements using 2013-2017 survey data from Malawi. Findings show only a minority of households can afford the nutrient-adequate diet at either bound, with 20% of households able to afford the (upper bound) shared diets and 38% the individualized (lower bound) diets. Individualized diets are more frequently feasible with locally available foods (90% vs. 60% of the time) and exhibit more moderate seasonal fluctuation. To meet all members' needs, a shared diet requires a more nutrient-dense combination of foods that is more costly and exhibits more seasonality in diet cost than any one food group or the individualized diets. The findings further help adjudicate the extent to which nutritional behavioral change programs versus broader agricultural and food policies can be relied upon to improve individual access to healthy diets.
    Date: 2022–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arx:papers:2207.07240&r=
  75. By: Cadot, Julien; Féral, Arnaud
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322550&r=
  76. By: Lu, Yifan (Tasmanian School of Business & Economics, University of Tasmania); Yamazaki, Satoshi (Tasmanian School of Business & Economics, University of Tasmania)
    Abstract: To what extent do marine-based economic activities influence the onset of violent conflict? Despite ongoing debate over several decades around the relationship between natural resources and violent conflict, little of the relevant research has addressed the marine environment. Based on satellite data in Indonesia, this paper provides new evidence on the relationship between fisheries and violent conflict. From a sample of 757 cells representing the spatial interaction of conflict and catch landings in 2015 and employing ocean productivity as an exogenous instrument, both industrial and non-industrial catches were found to have a statistically significant positive effect on the number of conflict events. Additionally, increased illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) catches are more likely than legal catches to cause violent conflict. An increase in fish catches in Indonesian waters fuels conflict of every kind, among which protests and riots are most sensitive to fisheries while fighting and terrorism are least sensitive. Overall, these empirical findings support the hypothesis that increased competition for common-pool resources contributes to the onset of violent conflict.
    Keywords: conflict, illegal fishing, marine resources, ocean productivity, satellite data, Indonesia
    JEL: D74 O13 Q22
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tas:wpaper:46656&r=
  77. By: Kadigi, Reuben M.J.; Robinson, Elizabeth; Szabo, Sylvia; Kangile, Joseph; Mgeni, Charles P.; De Maria, Marcello; Tsusaka, Takuji; Nhau, Brighton
    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Solow-Swan's proposition that poorer countries grow faster than richer countries causing declining income disparities across countries. The role of coffee trade in income convergence is also analyzed to enrich our understanding of whether traditional cash export crops, like coffee, contribute significantly to income convergence. We found that, GDP per capita was growing faster among coffee producers than coffee re-exporters, supporting the Solow-Swan's model. However, coffee export values and shares decreased with convergence for green coffee producers while increasing among re-exporters, implying unequal distribution of benefits along the global coffee value chain.
    Keywords: coefficient variation; coffee; GDP per capita convergence; Solow-Swan model; β-convergence; σ-convergence; Trade; Development and the Environment Hub Project (Project number ES/S008160/1) financed by the United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI) - represented by the Research Councils UK (RCUK) Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) with funds from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF); A UKRI Collective Fund.
    JEL: R14 J01 J1
    Date: 2022–05–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:115636&r=
  78. By: Posey, Sean; Dorfman, Jeffrey H.
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, International Development, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322498&r=
  79. By: Huang, Kuan-Ming; Guan, Zhengfei
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322556&r=
  80. By: Qin, Fei; Wu, Steven Y.
    Keywords: Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322473&r=
  81. By: Kim, Kevin N.; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322375&r=
  82. By: Rutledge, Zachariah; Mayorga, Joaquin
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, International Relations/Trade, International Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322515&r=
  83. By: Gabrielyan, Gnel; Just, David R.
    Keywords: Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322354&r=

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