nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2022‒08‒15
110 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. IFAD Research Series 84: Farmed animal production in tropical circular food systems By Oosting, Simon; van der Lee, Jan; Verdegem, Marc; de Vries, Marion; Vernooij, Adriaan; Bonilla-Cedrez, Camila; Kabir, Kazi
  2. IFAD Research Series 83: The future of farming: who will produce our food? By Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens; Delaune, Thomas; Silva, João Vasco; Descheemaeker, Katrien; van de Ven, Gerrie; Schut, Antonius G.T.; van Wijk, Mark; Hammond, Jim; Hochman, Zvi; Taulya, Godfrey; Chikowo, Regis; Narayanan, Sudha; Kishore, Avinash; Bresciani, Fabrizio; Mancini Teixeira, Heitor; van Ittersum, Martin
  3. IFAD Research Series 81: Food and water systems in semi-arid regions – case study: Egypt By Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Catharien; de Miguel Garcia, Angel; Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Wolters, Wouter; Heesmans, Hanneke; Dankers, Rutger; Smit, Robert; Smaling, Eric
  4. Assessment of Traditional Rice-Based Farming Systems for Adaptation to Climate Change in the Mekong Delta By Nguyen Van Kien; Vo Phu Qui; Vo Van Oc; Pham Tran Lan Phuong; Le Thi Phuong Dong; Lam Quoc Phuong; Pham Duy Tien; Truong Ngoc Thuy; Le Thanh Phong
  5. Water management in agriculture under growing water scarcity: Comparing policy options and listening to stakeholders across Europe, Israel and China By Haensch, Juliane; Bergmann, Holger; Quaranta, Gianni; Salvia, Rosanna; Sun, Dingqiang; Zhong, Funing; Plaas, Elke
  6. Understanding farmer perceptions of precision agriculture profitability in the U.S. Midwest By Wang, Tong; Jin, Hailong; Sieverding, Heidi L.; Rao, Xudong; Miao, Yuxin; Kumar, Sandeep; Redfearn, Daren; Nafchi, Ali
  7. Can collective property rights foster development? Evidence from a quasi-natural experiment in Colombia By Joaquín Daniel Ramírez-Cabarcas
  8. Global food price surge, in-kind transfers, and household welfare evidence from India By Digvijay S. Negi
  9. Impacts of pre-harvest and post-harvest treatments on reducing aflatoxin contamination in smallholder farmers’ maize By Jovanovic, Nina; Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob; Ketiem, Patrick; Bauchet, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Vivian
  10. Sustainable food systems for food security. Need for combination of local and global approaches By Alban Thomas; Arlène Alpha; Aleksandra Barczak; Nadine Zakhia-Rozis
  11. Climate change and weather variability in crop modelling: Evidence from rice yield trials in India using LSTM model By Reddy, Mallidi P.S.R.; Mathur, Ayush K.; Jain, Rohit K.; Agarwal, Sandip K.; Singh, Sriramjee
  12. Climate change adaptation and productive efficiency of subsistence farming: A bias-corrected panel data stochastic frontier approach By Asmare, Fissha; Jaraitė, Jūratė; Kažukauskas, Andrius
  13. Land tenure and profitability outcomes for U.S. beginning farmers and ranchers By Bauman, Allison; Jablonski, Becca B. R.; Key, Nigel D.; Hadrich, Joleen C.
  14. Farm exits and competition on the land market: Evidence from spatially explicit data By Dieter Pennerstorfer
  15. NASS Data Visualizations By Harris, Virginia
  16. IFAD Research Series 80: How can different types of smallholder commodity farmers be supported to achieve a living income? By Waarts, Yuca; Janssen, Valerie; Aryeetey, Richmond; Onduru, Davies; Heriyanto, Deddy; Tin Aprillya, Sukma; N’Guessan, Alhi; Courbois, Laura; Bakker, Deborah; Ingram, Verina
  17. Unintended costs of climate change adaption: Agricultural wells and access to drinking water By Bruno, Ellen; Hadachek, Jeffrey; Hagerty, Nick; Jessoe, Katrina K.
  18. On the economic value of the agronomic effects of crop diversification for farmers: Estimation based on farm cost accounting data By Sodjahin, Romaric; Carpentier, Alain; Koutchade, Obafèmi Philippe; Femenia, Fabienne
  19. Heterogeneous land supply responses in U.S. agriculture: Exploring changes in land use from reductions in biofuel mandates By Villoria, Nelson B.; Cisneros-Pineda, Alfredo; Haqiqi, Iman; Chakravarty, Shourish; Delgado, Michael; Hertel, Thomas W.
  20. Trade in agricultural and food products By Carl Gaigne; Christophe C. Gouel
  21. Agricultural production diversity and market access increase dietary diversity and reduce mortality in rural China By Wang, Xiaoxi; Xuan, Jiaqi; Chen, Hui; Jin, Songqing; Tian, Xu; Lin, Bin; Yuan, Changzheng
  22. Determinants and trajectories of federal expenditures on SNAP: The role of food prices By Hoang, Hoa K.; Westhoff, Patrick; Thompson, Wyatt; Madison, Daniel; Whistance, Jarrett
  23. Government Restrictions on Food Available to Consumers: Economics of Regulations that Limit Farming Practices for Products Sold within Jurisdictions, with Application to California’s 2022 Pork Rules By Lee, Hanbin; Sexton, Richard J.; Sumner, Daniel A.
  24. Response of climate-smart agriculture to weather shocks By Vyas, Shalika; Dalhaus, Tobias; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; Aggarwal, Pramod; Kropff, Martin; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian
  25. Quantifying the effect of social networks in the context of agricultural climate change mitigation By Kreft, Cordelia; Huber, Robert; Schäfer, David; Finger, Robert
  26. County-level USDA Crop Progress and Condition data, machine learning, and commodity market surprises By Cao, An N.Q.; Gebrekidan, Bisrat Haile; Heckelei, Thomas; Robe, Michel A.
  27. Climate change, technology adoption, and field crop farm productivity in the United States: Short-term vs. long-term By Wang, Sun Ling; Olver, Ryan; Bonin, Daniel; Dodson, Laura L.; Williams, Ryan C.
  28. Analysis of the impacts of agricultural incentives on the performance of agricultural value chains By Kassie, Girma T.; Martin, Will; Tokgoz, Simla
  29. Willingness to pay for bundled agricultural insurance products – results from a discrete choice experiment in Bihar, India By Mitra, Archisman; Bouwer, Roy; Balasubramanya, Soumya; Taron, Avinandan
  30. Bargaining Power in the Agricultural Land Rental Market By Kionka, Marlene; Kuethe, Todd H.; Musshoff, Oliver; Odening, Martin; Ritter, Matthias
  31. Effectiveness of farmer-led extension that combines demonstration plots and free trial packs: A field experiment in Tanzania By Maredia, Mywish K.; Farris, Jarrad G.; Mason, Nicole M.; Morgan, Stephen N.; Çakir, Metin
  32. COVID-19 and extreme weather: Impacts on food security and migration attitudes in rural Guatemala By Ceballos, Francisco; Hernandez, Manuel A.; Paz, Cynthia
  33. CRISPR Gene Editing Drivers, Barriers and Prospects: A Comparative Study among Plant Scientists Globally By De Lange, Job; Nalley, Lawton Lanier; Shew, Aaron M.; Steur, Hans De
  34. Agricultural Credit Conditions By Cowley, Cortney
  35. Urban-Rural Differences in Consumer Demand for Local and Organic Food By Jaenicke, Edward C.; Liu, Yizao; Dong, Xiao; Reed, Joshua J.; Huang, Chiu-Lin
  36. Vertical Structure, Price Spread, and Demand in the Organic Milk Market: A Structural Analysis By Tian, Guang; Du, Xiaodong; Stevens, Andrew W.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Barham, Bradford L.
  37. Payment for carbon mitigation reduces riskiness of bioenergy crop production By Majeed, Fahd; Khanna, Madhu; Miao, Ruiqing; Betes, Elena Blanc; Hudiburg, Tara; DeLucia, Evan
  38. The Impact of No-Till Production on Agricultural Land Values in the US Midwest By Chen, Le; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Aglasan, Serkan; Hagen, Stephen; Salas, William
  39. The Struggle to Intensify Cocoa Production in Ghana: Making a Living from the Forest in Western North By Yaro, Joseph A.; Teye, Joseph Kofi; Wiggins, Steve
  40. Precipitation causes quality losses of economic relevance in wheat production By Bucheli, Janic; Visse, Margot; Herrera, Juan; Häner, Lilia Levy; Tack, Jesse; Finger, Robert
  41. DOMESTIC OR IMPORTED? AN ANALYSIS OF RICE DEMAND IN SENEGAL By Faye, Ndèye Fatou; Faye, Amy; Sy, Mouhamed Rassoul; Lee, Seungmin; McPeak, John
  42. Revealing the fundamental parameters of a food demand system using estimated elasticities By Jeon, Younghyeon; Hoang, Hoa K.; Thompson, Wyatt; Abler, David; Miller, J. Isaac
  43. Improving Co-Benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program for Air Pollution and Biodiversity By Chen, Chen-Ti; Rudik, Ivan; Kling, Catherine L.; Rodewald, Amanda; Johnston, Alison
  44. Examining Joint Influence of Agricultural and Urban Factors on Texas Rural Land Values By Su, Tian; Dharmasena, Senarath; Leatham, David J.; Gilliland, Charles E
  45. Using Machine Learning to Test the Consistency of Food Insecurity Measures By Aveiga, Alexis H. Villacis; Badruddoza, Syed; Mayorga, Joaquin; Mishra, Ashok K.
  46. Farmers’ Heterogeneous Preferences for Selecting Attributes of Farmland Management Right Mortgages: Evidence from Western China By Peng, Yanling; Ren, Yanjun; Zhong, Yu; Jiang, Yuansheng
  47. The Future of Vertical Farming By Buelow, Roger
  48. Consumers Preferences for Eco-Labels and the Impact of Information: A Choice Experiment on Aquatic Food Products in China By Shi, Longzhong; Chen, Xuan; Qiu, Jingran; Li, Li
  49. Agricultural innovations on a microscopic scale: investigating determinants of farmers’ intention to try innovations based on soil microbes By Ploll, Ursula; Yeh, Ching-Hua; Huettel, Silke; Hartmann, Monika
  50. Bridging the intrahousehold dietary gap – the role of economic growth and women’s nutritional empowerment: Evidence from India By Gupta, Soumya; Vemireddy, Vidya; Seth, Payal; Pingali, Prabhu L.
  51. Are German farmers ready for ‘warm restructuring’ of the pig sector? By Thiermann, Insa; Schroeer, Daniel; Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe
  52. Consumer Expectations, Priorities, and Purchases of Healthy Food in the U.S. By Gerber, Suzannah; Reedy, Julia; O'Hearn, Meghan; Cruz, Sylara Marie; Mozaffarian, Dariush
  53. Trends in Farmland Values By Kuethe, Todd H.
  54. Changes in pumping times associated with irrigation best management practices: Empirical evidence from eastern Arkansas By Huang, Qiuqiong; Askey, Jacob; Henry, Christopher; Runkle, Benjamin R.K.
  55. Agricultural shocks, coping policies and deforestation: evidence from the coffee leaf rust epidemic in mexico By Isabelle Chort; Berk Öktem
  56. Does Date Label Matter for Aquacultural Food Product Waste? Evidence from a Best-Worst Discrete Choice Experiment By Nian, Yefan; Cruz, Julio C.; Asselt, Joanna Van; Gao, Zhifeng; Morgan, Stephen N.
  57. An analysis of how immigrants use time and money to manage household food insecurity By Zhou, Siwen; Berning, Joshua P.; Bonanno, Alessandro; Bayham, Jude
  58. Distance to destination and export price variation within agri-food firms By Fiankor, Dela-Dem Doe
  59. IFAD Research Series 85: Financing climate adaptation and resilient agricultural livelihoods By Lipper, Leslie; Cavatassi, Romina; Symons, Ricci; Gordes, Alashiya; Page, Oliver
  60. Aligning Bt Maize Planting with Pest Incidence and Efficacy Erosion Risk Suggests the Need for Paradigm Shifts By Ye, Ziwei; Krupke, Christian; DiFonzo, Christina; Hennessy, David A.; Wu, Felicia
  61. Exports and domestic prices: an instrumental variables approach applied to Mexican exports of fruits and vegetables to the U.S. By Juarez-Torres, Miriam; Arellano-Gonzalez, Jesus; Salcedo-Cisneros, Alejandrina; Zazueta-Borboa, Francisco
  62. Ethiopia: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Kedir Jemal, Mekamu; Smart, Jenny; Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum; Thurlow, James
  63. Nonclassical Measurement Error and Farmers’ Response to Information Reveal Behavioral Anomalies By Abay, Kibrom; Barrett, Christopher B.; Kilic, Talip; Moylan, Heather; Ilukor, John; Vundru, Wilbert
  64. Conservation and Insurance Policy Interactions: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Groundwater Policy and Implications for the Distribution of Costs By Goemans, Christopher; Manning, Dale; Sloggy, Matthew R.; Bryan, Calvin
  65. Assessing the carbon footprint of fresh produce assembly and distribution in the U.S. By Ge, Houtian; Baker, Quinton J.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy; Yi, Jing
  66. Issues in Pest Management: Citrus Greening By Fleites, Laura
  67. Tanzania: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  68. Zambia: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Chapoto, Antony; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Subakanya, Mitelo; Thurlow, James
  69. Producers Willingness to Adopt Best Management Practices in Upper Floridan Aquifer Region By He, Fei; Lai, John; Court, Christa D.; Borisova, Tatiana; Athearn, Kevin R.
  70. Agricultural trade impacts on biodiversity under heterogeneous endowments, technologies and regulatory regimes By Baylis, Kathy; Heckelei, Thomas; Latka, Catharina; Blomqvist, Linus
  71. Bangladesh: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  72. Irrigation Best Management Practices: Influencing Factors in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi By Day, Merri E.; Huang, Qiuqiong; Henry, Christopher; Krutz, Jason
  73. The triple differential vulnerability of female entrepreneurs to climate risk in sub-Saharan Africa: gendered barriers and enablers to private sector adaptation By Gannon, Kate; Castellano, Elena; Eskander, Shaikh; Agol, Dorice; Diop, Mamadou; Conway, Declan; Sprout, Liz
  74. Consumers' Wiliness to Pay for Locally Sourced Meat By Brouk, Matthias R.; Featherstone, Allen M.; Ifft, Jennifer; Tonsor, Glynn T.; Young, Sabrina K.
  75. Uganda: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  76. Nigeria: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Andam, Kwaw S.; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pradesha, Angga; Thurlow, James
  77. Echo of the Cannons ? Economic Impact of the Ukraine War on Pakistan -A macro-Micro Simulation Analysis By Muhammad Ayaz; Charlotte Fontan Sers; Hélène Maisonnave; Mazhar Mughal
  78. Online food delivery platform contributed to the resilience of urban food system in China during COVID-19 pandemic By Wang, Xiaobing; Zhao, Fangxiao; Tian, Xu; Min, Shi; Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan Von; Huang, Jikun; Fan, Shenggen
  79. Nepal: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Deb Pal, Barun; Smart, Jenny; Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Thurlow, James
  80. Mali: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  81. Private Sector Promotion of Climate-Smart Technologies: Experimental Evidence from Nigeria By Bloem, Jeffrey R.; Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda; Adjognon, Serge G.; Dillon, Andrew
  82. Senegal: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  83. Soil carbon, the blind spot of European national greenhouse gas inventories By Valentin Bellassen; Denis Angers; Tomasz Kowalczewski; Asger Olesen
  84. Niger: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  85. Kenya: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Breisinger, Clemens; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Mbuthia, Juneweenex; Omune, Lensa; Oseko, Edwin Ombui; Pradesha, Angga; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  86. Evaluating Factors Influencing Tennessee and Kentucky Farmers’ Willingness to Sell Produce Through Fresh Stop Markets By Velandia, Margarita; Denton, Riley; DeLong, Karen L.; Trejo-Pech, Carlos O.; Tanaka, Keiko; Rignall, Karen; Chen, Xuqi; Yenerall, Jackie
  87. Malawi: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Duchoslav, Jan; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  88. Ghana: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James; Asante, Seth; Patil, Pranav
  89. The Impact of Foreign Acquisitions on Employment, Output, and Wages in the U.S. Agrifood Industry By Kandilov, Ivan T.; Richards, Hannah; Zhou, Xi; Yasar, Mahmut; Rejesus, Roderick M.
  90. Weather shocks and components of Bennet-Lowe productivity: Evidence from the European vegetable-processing sector By Dalhaus, Tobias; Ang, Frederic; Merckelbach, Karl; Hirsch, Stefan
  91. Cambodia: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Thurlow, James; Smart, Jenny
  92. Consumer Trends: Global Animal Partnership By Malleau, Anne
  93. Rwanda: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Thurlow, James; Spielman, David J.; Smart, Jenny; Benimana, Gilberthe; Mugabo, Serge; Rosenbach, Gracie
  94. Anatomy of a Price Spike By Neeper, Jarral
  95. Myanmar: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Mahrt, Kristi; Minten, Bart; Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
  96. How Communication Affects the Adoption of Technologies in Agriculture in the United States By Colussi, Joana; Schnitkey, Gary D.; Morgan, Eric; Padula, Antonio Dmingos
  97. Organic Farming Transitions: A Dynamic Model By Meneses, Michael A.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Just, David R.; Kanbur, Ravi; Lee, David R.; Lawell, C.Y. Cynthia Lin
  98. Consumer willingness to pay for products derived from diversified forests: the case of tree syrups By Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Atallah, Shadi S.; Kalaitzandonakes, Maria H.; Ellison, Brenna
  99. The Information Communication Technology and Off-farm Employment of Rural Laborers: An Analysis Based on the Micro Data of China Family Panel Studies By Fang, Lan; Quan, Yurong; Mao, Hui; Chen, Shaojian
  100. Biofuels induced land use change emissions: The role of implemented emissions factors in assessing terrestrial carbon fluxes By Taheripour, Farzad; Steffen, Muller; Karami, Omid; Sajedinia, Ehsanreza; Emery, Isaac; Kwon, Hoyoung
  101. Does soybean cultivation impact local deforestation in Brazilian Amazon? By Rocha, Jr., Adauto B.; Pinto, Bruno Chaves Morone; Tavares, Paulo A.; Fendrich, Arthur N.
  102. Dairy Outlook for 2022 By Liebrand, Carolyn
  103. Democratic Republic of the Congo: Impacts of the Ukraine and global crises on poverty and food security By Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Thurlow, James; Ulimwengu, John M.
  104. Buying groups formation: what effects on competition in the retail industry? By Marie-Laure Allain; Rémi Avignon; Claire Chambolle; Hugo Molina
  105. Rational Addiction to Food by Obesity Status By Reed, Joshua J.; Jaenicke, Edward C.; Liu, Yizao; Wang, Emily; Zeballos, Eliana
  106. Food package information and the success of processed potato products in The UK By Costa-Font, Montserrat; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar
  107. Can an environmental policy contribute to the reduction of land conflict? Evidence from the Rural Environmental Registry (CAR) in the Brazilian Amazon By Shinde, Nilesh N.; Do Valle, Stella Z. Schons; Maia, Alexandre Gori; Amacher, Gregory S.
  108. A network analysis of research on African agricultural development By von Fintel, Dieter; Vink, Nick
  109. Climate change heterogeneity: a new quantitative approach By Gadea Rivas, Marta Dolores; Gonzalo, Jesús
  110. The Quality of Lunches Brought from Home to School: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis By Song, Siwan; Villarreal, Elizabeth N.A. Tabares; Melo, Grace; Ishdorj, Ariun

  1. By: Oosting, Simon; van der Lee, Jan; Verdegem, Marc; de Vries, Marion; Vernooij, Adriaan; Bonilla-Cedrez, Camila; Kabir, Kazi
    Abstract: For farmed animal production in the tropics, there are two important food system outcomes: supplying animal-sourced food to ensure healthy diets for all; and contributing to climate change mitigation and minimizing pollution. In this review, the role of farmed animals in circular food systems in the tropics is presented in four case studies. The impacts of circularity on food security and environmental impact mitigation are discussed. Farmed animals are important in circular food systems because they use land unsuited to crop production, they upgrade crop residues, and they supply manure for crop production. However, their increased demand puts pressure on important aspects of circularity, such as minimizing food-feed competition, maximizing use of waste streams in feed, and the value of manure for fertilization.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management
    Date: 2022–06–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadrs:322018&r=
  2. By: Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens; Delaune, Thomas; Silva, João Vasco; Descheemaeker, Katrien; van de Ven, Gerrie; Schut, Antonius G.T.; van Wijk, Mark; Hammond, Jim; Hochman, Zvi; Taulya, Godfrey; Chikowo, Regis; Narayanan, Sudha; Kishore, Avinash; Bresciani, Fabrizio; Mancini Teixeira, Heitor; van Ittersum, Martin
    Abstract: Achieving zero hunger means food systems must deliver nutritious diets for all. These systems must be sustainable—providing farmers with sufficient livelihoods while protecting natural ecosystems. Concurrently, the economic viability of farms is coming into question, while changing patterns of land ownership, rental, and exchange mean that the concept of what a farm is becoming increasingly fluid. In this report, we highlight past trends and explore possible future trajectories of smallholder farming to predict who the farmers of the future are. Smallholder farms will remain an important source of food and income, and a social safety net in the absence of alternative livelihood security. Therefore, pro-poor policies and investments are needed to stimulate small-scale agriculture and rural development.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2022–06–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadrs:322005&r=
  3. By: Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Catharien; de Miguel Garcia, Angel; Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Wolters, Wouter; Heesmans, Hanneke; Dankers, Rutger; Smit, Robert; Smaling, Eric
    Abstract: Water is a major driver of food systems in arid and semi-arid countries. This paper explores the role of water in Egypt’s food system and the dilemma the country faces: raise food self-sufficiency by allocating freshwater resources from the Nile to food production, or rely on food imports from water-abundant regions worldwide. Using a food system analysis approach, the main drivers and outcomes in Egypt’s food system are described, followed by two examples of food system trade-offs where water plays an important role: wheat and chicken. The paper concludes with a reflection on the role of water in the food system and gives suggestions on how the role of water in the food system can be addressed systematically.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2022–06–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadrs:322002&r=
  4. By: Nguyen Van Kien; Vo Phu Qui; Vo Van Oc; Pham Tran Lan Phuong; Le Thi Phuong Dong; Lam Quoc Phuong; Pham Duy Tien; Truong Ngoc Thuy; Le Thanh Phong
    Abstract: Climate change has brought enormous challenges to human lives, livelihoods, and the environment. Temperature increase, abnormal floods, and water pollution have negatively impacted on socioeconomic and agricultural systems in the Vietnamese Mekong delta. The aims of this study are to assess the readiness of traditional rice farming systems in the Vietnamese Mekong delta in adapting to climate change conditions and select traditional rice genetic materials for supporting breeding programs in the future. The research was conducted from April 2016 to December 2017 in the upper part of the Vietnamese Mekong delta, including An Giang, Kien Giang, and Long An provinces where the cultivation of traditional rice varieties or TRV thrive with the conditions brought by the climate change such as drought and salinity. Social research methods were used to assess farmers’ socioeconomic status, indigenous farming knowledge, and the alternative farming models in the context of climate change. Sampling seeds were also analyzed based on morphological and yield-related indicators. TRVs are distributed mainly in Kien Giang and Long An provinces and some mountainous areas of Tri Ton district in An Giang province. Yield varies from four to seven t/ha and these rice varieties are well adapted to unfavorable soil and adverse weather conditions such as drought, salinity, and alum toxicity. These rice varieties can tolerate submergence of
    Keywords: Vietnam, Mekong Delta, climate change adaptation, rice-based farming system, traditional farming, TRV
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:sag:seadps:2022:518&r=
  5. By: Haensch, Juliane; Bergmann, Holger; Quaranta, Gianni; Salvia, Rosanna; Sun, Dingqiang; Zhong, Funing; Plaas, Elke
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Farm Management
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321231&r=
  6. By: Wang, Tong; Jin, Hailong; Sieverding, Heidi L.; Rao, Xudong; Miao, Yuxin; Kumar, Sandeep; Redfearn, Daren; Nafchi, Ali
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322502&r=
  7. By: Joaquín Daniel Ramírez-Cabarcas
    Abstract: I estimate the effect of collective property rights on development in rural Colombia in the context of a case study. In the 1990s, the Colombian government started one of the most ambitious land re-orderings in Latin America, which titled collective property rights to Afro-Colombian communities throughout the Colombian Pacific. I take advantage of a historical accident in these titling processes, which delayed the collective land titling of one community for 16 years until November 2015, one year after the Colombian National Agricultural Census 2014 (CNA). With the CNA data, I use the delayed community as counterfactual for its titled neighbours, and use spatial regression discontinuity with the borders between communities, largely determined by proximity to river basins. In the context of this case study, I find that farms in collectively titled communities have higher agricultural yield by 6 percentage points, devote more farm area share to perennial crops by 28 percentage points, and have 18 percentage points higher school attendance. I suggest these results could be a consequence of a higher motivation of farmers in titled territories to invest in their land, along with collective forms of production to provide labor among poor farmers.
    Keywords: Property rights, Communal lands, Land reform
    JEL: P48 P32 Q15
    Date: 2022–07–22
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:col:000089:020327&r=
  8. By: Digvijay S. Negi (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)
    Abstract: This paper studies the impact of high global food prices on household welfare in India. I use the 2007-08 surge in global food prices and household share of area under rice and wheat at the baseline to show that food cultivating households gain from high prices. These welfare gains mainly accrue to net food producers. I observe that net food producer households were able to maintain their per capita spending and consumption of rice and wheat by decreasing consumption of market purchased rice and wheat and increasing consumption of government- subsidized rice and wheat. Net consumer households, on the other hand, experienced a decline in the total per capita consumption of rice and wheat even though they substituted their market purchases with homegrown produce and subsidized grains. The role of in-kind food transfers in insulating households from high prices was evident for both net producers and consumers. Finally, high prices induced working-age adult males in net food-producing households to increase work days and hours worked per day on their own farm and reallocated labor from market wage work to labor on their own farm.
    Keywords: Global food prices, net producers, in-kind transfers, welfare, India
    JEL: O12 I38 Q18
    Date: 2022–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2022-006&r=
  9. By: Jovanovic, Nina; Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob; Ketiem, Patrick; Bauchet, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Vivian
    Keywords: International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322257&r=
  10. By: Alban Thomas (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Arlène Alpha (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement, Cirad-ES - Département Environnements et Sociétés - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement); Aleksandra Barczak (SAE2 - Département Sciences Sociales, Agriculture et Alimentation, Espace et Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Nadine Zakhia-Rozis (Cirad-Dgdrs - Direction Générale Déléguée à la Recherche et à la Stratégie - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement)
    Abstract: Food and nutritional security refers to the challenge of providing sustainable, healthy and accessible food to all people. It has four interconnected dimensions: availability, access, utilization and stability. Tackling this tremendous challenge means transforming our food systems and mobilizing key stakeholders and decision-makers to leverage intersectoral knowledge and scientific evidence. From 2014 to 2020, CIRAD and INRAE led an ambitious interdisciplinary flagship programme on the transitions for global food security called GloFoodS. Authored by principal investigators and contributors to research projects funded by GloFoodS, this book is representative of the programme's interdisciplinary research but does not claim to provide exhaustive coverage of topics and approaches of food security. It presents recent research findings from many disciplines, including the life, engineering and social sciences. The findings were drawn from different analysis scales as well as from the combination of local and global food security approaches. The various chapters explore issues such as food system governance, balance and discrepancies between agricultural supply and food needs, the role of innovations in providing high-quality foods and promoting resilient value chains, and the role of local resource management in achieving food security. This book will be of interest to a broad scientific audience of researchers, academics, food systems professionals and decision-makers, as well as readers interested in food and nutritional security issues.
    Date: 2022–06–30
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03699725&r=
  11. By: Reddy, Mallidi P.S.R.; Mathur, Ayush K.; Jain, Rohit K.; Agarwal, Sandip K.; Singh, Sriramjee
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322362&r=
  12. By: Asmare, Fissha; Jaraitė, Jūratė; Kažukauskas, Andrius
    Abstract: We explore the impact of climate change adaptation on the technical efficiency of Ethiopian farmers using panel data collected from 6,820 farm plots. We employ Green's (2010) stochastic frontier approach and propensity score matching to address selection bias. Our results reveal that climate change adaptation improves the efficiency of maize, wheat, and barley production. We also show that failure to account for selection bias underestimates the average efficiency level. Our findings imply that the expansion of climate change adaptation at larger scales will provide a double benefit by curbing climate-related risks and increasing the efficiency of farmers. Moreover, increasing credit access and introducing mechanisms that allow farmers to get enough amount of water during the main growing season will enhance the efficiency of subsistence farmers.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321197&r=
  13. By: Bauman, Allison; Jablonski, Becca B. R.; Key, Nigel D.; Hadrich, Joleen C.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322233&r=
  14. By: Dieter Pennerstorfer
    Abstract: In this article, we analyze competition for agricultural land as an important, scarce and immobile input. The cost of cultivating a parcel of land depends strongly on the distance from the farmer to the plot, leading to spatially small land markets. To investigate this issue, we are able to use extremely rich datasets, and combine information on both farms and their cultivated plots (including their exact locations) for virtually all farms in Austria for a five-year period. When analyzing the takeover of parcels from farms leaving the market, we find that the distance between an exiting farm’s plot and the closest parcel of a prospective buyer farm is an important determinant of which buyer will prevail on the land market. In addition, the proximity between the farmsteads of the exiting farm and a prospective buyer farm is also important. The results suggest (i) that agricultural land markets are indeed very small and (ii) that information frictions are important in this market.
    Keywords: spatial competition, land market, farm exit, spatial data
    JEL: L13 L25 Q12 R14
    Date: 2022–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:jku:econwp:2022-09&r=
  15. By: Harris, Virginia
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao21:321011&r=
  16. By: Waarts, Yuca; Janssen, Valerie; Aryeetey, Richmond; Onduru, Davies; Heriyanto, Deddy; Tin Aprillya, Sukma; N’Guessan, Alhi; Courbois, Laura; Bakker, Deborah; Ingram, Verina
    Abstract: While many sources indicate that smallholder commodity farmers are poor, there is a lack of data on the number and the depth of poverty. Using datasets on smallholder cocoa and tea farmers in Ghana, Côte d’Ivoire, and Kenya, combined with existing literature, this paper finds that a large proportion of smallholders do not have the potential to earn a living income. The paper finds that short- to medium-term interventions are most effective for improving the livelihoods of poor farmers, including food security and health, off-farm employment, and social assistance.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–06–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadrs:322001&r=
  17. By: Bruno, Ellen; Hadachek, Jeffrey; Hagerty, Nick; Jessoe, Katrina K.
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322241&r=
  18. By: Sodjahin, Romaric; Carpentier, Alain; Koutchade, Obafèmi Philippe; Femenia, Fabienne
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322295&r=
  19. By: Villoria, Nelson B.; Cisneros-Pineda, Alfredo; Haqiqi, Iman; Chakravarty, Shourish; Delgado, Michael; Hertel, Thomas W.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322315&r=
  20. By: Carl Gaigne (INRAE, Économie, UMR Smart, Rennes, Centre de Recherche, CREATE - ULaval - Université Laval [Québec]); Christophe C. Gouel (CEPII - Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales - Centre d'analyse stratégique, UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: This chapter reviews how the literature on trade in agricultural and food products has developed over the last 20 years. Its evolution has been heavily influenced by several developments in the international trade literature. The first relates to trade theories that connect closely with observables: new Ricardian models and firm-level analysis. The second relates to a shift toward applied work involving estimated gravity models and counterfactual simulations. Within a unifying framework, we provide a bird-eye overview of recent developments in trade literature that improves the predictive capability of empirical and theoretical studies for agricultural and food sectors. We highlight how land heterogeneity, technology, vertical relationships in the food chain, quality of food products, and taste affect agri-food trade and its welfare consequences. We also discuss the emergence of new policy issues such as climate change, quality standards, food security, market volatility, and nutrition transition, where although trade may not be at the center of the issues it mediates most of the effects. Last, this chapter identifies possible future developments to make agricultural trade a very active research field, with specific focus on the consumer preferences, hidden costs, production technologies, and market structures.
    Abstract: Ce chapitre présente comment la littérature sur le commerce de produits agricoles et agro-alimentaires s'est développée au cours des 20 dernières années. Son évolution a été fortement influencée par plusieurs développements de la littérature de commerce international. Tout d'abord, les théories du commerce qui connectent étroitement avec les données : les modèles néo-ricardiens et les modèles au niveau firme. Ensuite, la réorientation vers des travaux appliqués impliquant l'estimation de modèles de gravité et des simulations contrefactuelles. Dans un cadre unifié, nous proposons un résumé des développements récents de la littérature de commerce permettant de meilleures capacités de prévisions empiriques et théoriques pour les secteurs agricoles et agro-alimentaires.
    Keywords: Agriculture,Food industry,Heterogeneity,Comparative advantage,Quality,Trade,Volatility,Input-output relationships
    Date: 2022–06–22
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03707237&r=
  21. By: Wang, Xiaoxi; Xuan, Jiaqi; Chen, Hui; Jin, Songqing; Tian, Xu; Lin, Bin; Yuan, Changzheng
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322213&r=
  22. By: Hoang, Hoa K.; Westhoff, Patrick; Thompson, Wyatt; Madison, Daniel; Whistance, Jarrett
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322084&r=
  23. By: Lee, Hanbin; Sexton, Richard J.; Sumner, Daniel A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322438&r=
  24. By: Vyas, Shalika; Dalhaus, Tobias; Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.; Aggarwal, Pramod; Kropff, Martin; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322327&r=
  25. By: Kreft, Cordelia; Huber, Robert; Schäfer, David; Finger, Robert
    Keywords: Farm Management, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321198&r=
  26. By: Cao, An N.Q.; Gebrekidan, Bisrat Haile; Heckelei, Thomas; Robe, Michel A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322281&r=
  27. By: Wang, Sun Ling; Olver, Ryan; Bonin, Daniel; Dodson, Laura L.; Williams, Ryan C.
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Production Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322595&r=
  28. By: Kassie, Girma T.; Martin, Will; Tokgoz, Simla
    Abstract: Agricultural value chains are enormously important for development and poverty reduction in developing countries. Unfortunately, the wide array of forms of intervention used creates serious difficulties in understanding its impacts on agricultural value chains and on the economy in general. This paper reviews recent work to increase transparency of agricultural support measures and to assess their impacts on key outcomes. To do this, it draws lessons from various studies on agricultural incentives, including the global Ag-Incentives database, studies exploring the link between agricultural incentives and value chain development, and studies exploring the links between agricultural incentives and environmental outcomes. Studies highlighted in the Report will allow future researchers to use the described methodologies and tools and apply them to different countries, different contexts, and different commodities. This research portfolio has created a foundation for future work relevant to the five Impact Areas of One CGIAR; namely, nutrition, health, and food security; poverty reduction, livelihoods, and jobs; gender equality, youth, and inclusion; climate adaptation and mitigation; and environmental health and biodiversity.
    Keywords: WORLD; agriculture; incentives; greenhouse gases; value chains; agricultural value chains; nominal rate of assistance; nominal rate of protection
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:2127&r=
  29. By: Mitra, Archisman; Bouwer, Roy; Balasubramanya, Soumya; Taron, Avinandan
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322159&r=
  30. By: Kionka, Marlene; Kuethe, Todd H.; Musshoff, Oliver; Odening, Martin; Ritter, Matthias
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322186&r=
  31. By: Maredia, Mywish K.; Farris, Jarrad G.; Mason, Nicole M.; Morgan, Stephen N.; Çakir, Metin
    Keywords: International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322528&r=
  32. By: Ceballos, Francisco; Hernandez, Manuel A.; Paz, Cynthia
    Abstract: This paper examines the continuing effects of COVID-19 and exposure to weather extremes on income, dietary, and migration outcomes in rural Guatemala. We rely on a comprehensive longitudinal survey of 1,612 smallholder farmers collected over three survey rounds in 2019, 2020, and 2021. We find improvements in incomes, food security, and dietary diversity in 2021 relative to 2020, but with levels still below pre-pandemic ones in 2019. We also find a substantial increase in the intention to emigrate that was not observed in the onset of the pandemic. In terms of the channels mediating the variations in dietary diversity and migration intentions, income shocks seem to have played a role, in contrast to direct exposure to the virus, local mobility restrictions, and food market disruptions. Importantly, households exposed to ETA and IOTA tropical storms, in addition to COVID-19, were considerably more prone to exhibit larger increases in the prevalence of moderate or severe food insecure episodes and larger decreases in their diet quality. The study provides novel evidence on vulnerable households’ wellbeing in the aftermath of a global crisis, including the effects of compound shocks.
    Keywords: GUATEMALA; LATIN AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; NORTH AMERICA; Coronavirus; coronavirus disease; Coronavirinae; COVID-19; weather; extreme weather events; food security; migration; rural areas; shock; households
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:ifprid:2126&r=
  33. By: De Lange, Job; Nalley, Lawton Lanier; Shew, Aaron M.; Steur, Hans De
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322216&r=
  34. By: Cowley, Cortney
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Farm Management
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao22:321101&r=
  35. By: Jaenicke, Edward C.; Liu, Yizao; Dong, Xiao; Reed, Joshua J.; Huang, Chiu-Lin
    Keywords: Marketing, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322232&r=
  36. By: Tian, Guang; Du, Xiaodong; Stevens, Andrew W.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Barham, Bradford L.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322110&r=
  37. By: Majeed, Fahd; Khanna, Madhu; Miao, Ruiqing; Betes, Elena Blanc; Hudiburg, Tara; DeLucia, Evan
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322277&r=
  38. By: Chen, Le; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Aglasan, Serkan; Hagen, Stephen; Salas, William
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Productivity Analysis, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322445&r=
  39. By: Yaro, Joseph A.; Teye, Joseph Kofi; Wiggins, Steve
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321226&r=
  40. By: Bucheli, Janic; Visse, Margot; Herrera, Juan; Häner, Lilia Levy; Tack, Jesse; Finger, Robert
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321208&r=
  41. By: Faye, Ndèye Fatou; Faye, Amy; Sy, Mouhamed Rassoul; Lee, Seungmin; McPeak, John
    Abstract: Rice is among the most important cereals for African countries which absorb more than half of worldwide exports. West African countries depend particularly on rice imports in order to achieve food security. For this reason, many policy measures are implemented by governments to regulate the market and reduce the import dependency. This paper contributes to the rice policy debate by analyzing the demand side using the case study of Senegal in West Africa. We analyzed detailed data on rice consumption using a large primary survey of 6,328 rural and urban households in Senegal, with the QUAIDS model. Qualitative data were also collected and analyzed to better interpret results. We found that rural households consume far less local rice than their urban counterparts, meaning that location is a determinant of local rice consumption. We also show that types of rice consumed differ between rural and urban consumers. Urban households consume relatively more whole grain local rice while rural households consume more broken imported rice. Thus, to increase consumption of local rice, efforts should thus be made on the availability of broken local rice for both urban and rural consumers. Our results indicate no substitutability between domestic rice and imported rice in urban households and weak substitutability in rural households. In addition, results show that rice demand is price inelastic. Thus, price policies like subsidies or taxes may not be good shifters of domestic rice consumption.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:miprpb:322052&r=
  42. By: Jeon, Younghyeon; Hoang, Hoa K.; Thompson, Wyatt; Abler, David; Miller, J. Isaac
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322182&r=
  43. By: Chen, Chen-Ti; Rudik, Ivan; Kling, Catherine L.; Rodewald, Amanda; Johnston, Alison
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322544&r=
  44. By: Su, Tian; Dharmasena, Senarath; Leatham, David J.; Gilliland, Charles E
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322504&r=
  45. By: Aveiga, Alexis H. Villacis; Badruddoza, Syed; Mayorga, Joaquin; Mishra, Ashok K.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322472&r=
  46. By: Peng, Yanling; Ren, Yanjun; Zhong, Yu; Jiang, Yuansheng
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322408&r=
  47. By: Buelow, Roger
    Keywords: Farm Management, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao21:320990&r=
  48. By: Shi, Longzhong; Chen, Xuan; Qiu, Jingran; Li, Li
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322209&r=
  49. By: Ploll, Ursula; Yeh, Ching-Hua; Huettel, Silke; Hartmann, Monika
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Marketing, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322467&r=
  50. By: Gupta, Soumya; Vemireddy, Vidya; Seth, Payal; Pingali, Prabhu L.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322175&r=
  51. By: Thiermann, Insa; Schroeer, Daniel; Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe
    Abstract: Recent statutory changes have increased the pressure on the German livestock sector to adapt. This paper aimed to ascertain whether German pig farmers would be willing to join a pig farming exit scheme similar to the Dutch ‘warm restructuring’ programme. The analysis was based on a discrete choice experiment with 346 pig farmers. The results indicated great interest of the respondents in a government-run decommissioning scheme. Differences in the perception of scheme attributes (compensation offered, demolition requirements, restrictions on future barn construction and slurry intake) and uncertainty among participants were highlighted by the results of a scale-adjusted latent-class estimation.
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321201&r=
  52. By: Gerber, Suzannah; Reedy, Julia; O'Hearn, Meghan; Cruz, Sylara Marie; Mozaffarian, Dariush
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322421&r=
  53. By: Kuethe, Todd H.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Farm Management
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao22:321102&r=
  54. By: Huang, Qiuqiong; Askey, Jacob; Henry, Christopher; Runkle, Benjamin R.K.
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322147&r=
  55. By: Isabelle Chort (TREE - Transitions Energétiques et Environnementales - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, IUF - Institut Universitaire de France - M.E.N.E.S.R. - Ministère de l'Education nationale, de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche); Berk Öktem (TREE - Transitions Energétiques et Environnementales - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)
    Abstract: Deforestation in the tropics is a critical issue that interacts with global environmental changes, and the mediating role of negative agricultural shocks is ambiguous. We investigate the impact of the massive epidemic of coffee leaf rust (CLR) that affected Central America from 2012 on deforestation in Mexico. CLR is a fungal disease that negatively affects coffee production. We exploit the gradual and random diffusion of the epidemic across coffee-growing municipalities and estimate a difference-indifference model. We find that deforestation increased by 32% in CLR-affected municipalities but we find no increase in agricultural land. Effects are driven by municipalities with low coffee yields, characterizing shade coffee systems, and states where rustic coffee systems were predominant. These results suggest that deforestation occurred within coffee cultivation areas and point out the concurrent role of government subsidies and incentives through the PROCAFE program, launched in 2014, that promoted the replacement of traditional coffee trees by CLR-resistant hybrids. We study the dynamic effects of CLR and exploit the delayed launch of PROCAFE to try to disentangle the impact of the epidemic from that of the policy response. Our results emphasize the vulnerability of agroforestry systems to exogenous shocks and suggest that PROCAFE, as a short-term response to CLR, contributed to increasing deforestation and accelerating the transition of Mexican traditional coffee landscapes to monoculture.
    Keywords: deforestation,coffee,Mexico,climate change,land use,agroforestry systems,government policies
    Date: 2022–07–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-03715600&r=
  56. By: Nian, Yefan; Cruz, Julio C.; Asselt, Joanna Van; Gao, Zhifeng; Morgan, Stephen N.
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322495&r=
  57. By: Zhou, Siwen; Berning, Joshua P.; Bonanno, Alessandro; Bayham, Jude
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Consumer/Household Economics, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322347&r=
  58. By: Fiankor, Dela-Dem Doe
    Abstract: This paper assesses how bilateral distance affects observed spatial variation in free-on-board (FOB) export prices across destinations. I estimate linear models that regress firm-product- destination-time FOB unit values on distance, firm-product-time fixed effects, and destination country controls. I find that if distance doubles the average Swiss agri-food firm increases its FOB export price by 2.3%. My findings show that consumers in distant countries pay higher prices partly because firms charge higher prices net cost-insurance-freight costs. I explain my findings using trade models where firms endogenously choose destination-specific quality for their products.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Demand and Price Analysis, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321203&r=
  59. By: Lipper, Leslie; Cavatassi, Romina; Symons, Ricci; Gordes, Alashiya; Page, Oliver
    Abstract: Climate change is imposing a transformative process on agricultural and food systems, threatening the livelihoods of people dependent on them, including a large proportion of the world’s poor people. Moving to a process that contributes to improving rather than endangering livelihoods is the challenge that climate change adaptation and resilience-building efforts currently face. Transformative adaptation that addresses the interactions between food systems and climate change requires adequate, accessible, and appropriate financing. Expanding climate finance resources from the public sector and creating an incentivizing environment for private sector investments is needed to attain adequate levels of financing. Appropriate finance must be designed to address specific characteristics of adaptation investments, such as risk, delayed returns, high social values, and new and unproven activities. Using blended finance integrated with development finance can generate financing appropriate to the investment needs.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–06–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadrs:322020&r=
  60. By: Ye, Ziwei; Krupke, Christian; DiFonzo, Christina; Hennessy, David A.; Wu, Felicia
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322082&r=
  61. By: Juarez-Torres, Miriam; Arellano-Gonzalez, Jesus; Salcedo-Cisneros, Alejandrina; Zazueta-Borboa, Francisco
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322447&r=
  62. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Kedir Jemal, Mekamu; Smart, Jenny; Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has dou-bled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development part-ners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: ETHIOPIA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:2&r=
  63. By: Abay, Kibrom; Barrett, Christopher B.; Kilic, Talip; Moylan, Heather; Ilukor, John; Vundru, Wilbert
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322127&r=
  64. By: Goemans, Christopher; Manning, Dale; Sloggy, Matthew R.; Bryan, Calvin
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322356&r=
  65. By: Ge, Houtian; Baker, Quinton J.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy; Yi, Jing
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322537&r=
  66. By: Fleites, Laura
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management
    Date: 2021–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao21:321038&r=
  67. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: TANZANIA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:11&r=
  68. By: Chapoto, Antony; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Subakanya, Mitelo; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: ZAMBIA, SOUTHERN AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:15&r=
  69. By: He, Fei; Lai, John; Court, Christa D.; Borisova, Tatiana; Athearn, Kevin R.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322578&r=
  70. By: Baylis, Kathy; Heckelei, Thomas; Latka, Catharina; Blomqvist, Linus
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322488&r=
  71. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has dou-bled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development part-ners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: BANGLADESH, SOUTH ASIA, ASIA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:3&r=
  72. By: Day, Merri E.; Huang, Qiuqiong; Henry, Christopher; Krutz, Jason
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322174&r=
  73. By: Gannon, Kate; Castellano, Elena; Eskander, Shaikh; Agol, Dorice; Diop, Mamadou; Conway, Declan; Sprout, Liz
    Abstract: The ability of businesses to adapt effectively to climate change is highly influenced by the external business enabling environment. Constraints to adaptive capacity are experienced by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) across sub-Saharan Africa, regardless of the gender of the business owner. However, gender is a critical social cleavage through which differences in adaptive capacity manifest and in Africa most entrepreneurs are women. We conduct a systematic review to synthesise existing knowledge on differential vulnerability of female entrepreneurs in Africa to climate risk, in relation to their sensitivity to extreme climate events and their adaptive capacity. We synthesise this literature using a vulnerability analysis approach that situates vulnerability and adaptive capacity within the context of the wider climate risk framework denoted in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. In doing so, we identify gendered barriers and enablers to private sector adaptation and suggest women entrepreneurs face a ‘triple differential vulnerability’ to climate change, wherein they: 1) are often more sensitive to climate risk, as a result of their concentration in certain sectors and types of enterprises (e.g. micro SMEs in the agricultural sector in remote regions); 2) face additional barriers to adaptation in the business environment, including access to finance, technologies, (climate and adaptation) information and supportive policies; and 3) are also often concurrently on the frontline of managing climate risk at household levels. Since various forms of inequality often create compounding experiences of discrimination and vulnerability, we pay particular attention to how factors of differential vulnerability intersect, amplify and reproduce.
    Keywords: ES/R009708/1; Wiley deal
    JEL: R14 J01
    Date: 2022–06–15
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:115222&r=
  74. By: Brouk, Matthias R.; Featherstone, Allen M.; Ifft, Jennifer; Tonsor, Glynn T.; Young, Sabrina K.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322583&r=
  75. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: UGANDA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:12&r=
  76. By: Andam, Kwaw S.; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pradesha, Angga; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has dou-bled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development part-ners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: NIGERIA, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:4&r=
  77. By: Muhammad Ayaz (UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour); Charlotte Fontan Sers (ESC PAU - Ecole Supérieure de Commerce, Pau Business School); Hélène Maisonnave (EDEHN - Equipe d'Economie Le Havre Normandie - ULH - Université Le Havre Normandie - NU - Normandie Université); Mazhar Mughal (ESC PAU - Ecole Supérieure de Commerce, Pau Business School)
    Abstract: The 2022 Ukraine conflict has contributed to a major spike in international commodity prices. In this study, we design a top-down, macro-micro simulation analysis to focus on the price shock due to four major commodities, namely wheat, vegetable oil, petroleum, and fertilizers. We combine Computable General Equilibrium simulations with household survey data from the Pakistan Household Integrated Economic Survey (HIES) 2018-19 to estimate macro-and microeconomic impact of the global commodity crisis. We come up with evidence for a significant, non-negligible negative impact of the price shock, both at the aggregate and the household level. The real GDP shrinks and households real consumption and income decrease. The drop in consumption and income is more visible among farm households, with the two falling by 5% and 3.48% respectively. In the same vein, the $3.2 headcount poverty rate at the 2018 purchasing power parity increases by 1.15%. This is much higher than the 0.21% increase in the $1.9 poverty rate. The drop in consumption and income appears to be proportionally greater among the lower and middle-income households than those at the bottom of the income distribution. This is reflected in a slight drop in overall income inequality. Besides, while the increase in headcount poverty is greater among farm households, it is the urban households which show the worst decline in food security, both in terms of incidence and intensity of food insecurity. This set of results underscores the vulnerability of Pakistani households to surge in commodity prices. The role of petrol prices in driving poverty among rural farm households and that of food stuff (wheat and vegetable oil prices) in aggravating urban food security is particularly evident.
    Keywords: Food security,macro-micro models,Ukraine war,Pakistan
    Date: 2022–07–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-03718240&r=
  78. By: Wang, Xiaobing; Zhao, Fangxiao; Tian, Xu; Min, Shi; Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan Von; Huang, Jikun; Fan, Shenggen
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322111&r=
  79. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Deb Pal, Barun; Smart, Jenny; Takeshima, Hiroyuki; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: NEPAL, SOUTH ASIA, ASIA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:13&r=
  80. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the increase occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has dou-bled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development part-ners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: MALI, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:7&r=
  81. By: Bloem, Jeffrey R.; Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda; Adjognon, Serge G.; Dillon, Andrew
    Keywords: International Development, Agribusiness, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322152&r=
  82. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: SENEGAL, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:8&r=
  83. By: Valentin Bellassen (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - Institut Agro Dijon - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement); Denis Angers (ULaval - Université Laval [Québec]); Tomasz Kowalczewski (COWI A/S); Asger Olesen (Forest Stewardship Council)
    Abstract: Soil carbon is currently being monitored in European national greenhouse-gas (GHG) inventories. Reviewing the data and methods, we find that unreported losses could be around 70 MtCO2 yr–1 in croplands, and unreported gains could be around 15 MtCO2 yr–1 in grasslands and 45 MtCO2 yr–1 in forests. The share of European Union (EU) forest area for which soil carbon is being accurately reported is at most 33%, and more likely close to 24%. Accuracy is even worse for grasslands and croplands. Widespread adoption of key carbon-farming practices (peatland restoration, agroforestry, substituting maize with grass) could remove an additional 150–350 MtCO2 yr–1. Yet, if effective policies lead to realizing this potential, current GHG inventories would not capture their climate mitigation benefits.
    Keywords: national greenhouse gas inventories,soil carbon,monitoring,transparency
    Date: 2022–04–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03631358&r=
  84. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has dou-bled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development part-ners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: NIGER, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:6&r=
  85. By: Breisinger, Clemens; Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Mbuthia, Juneweenex; Omune, Lensa; Oseko, Edwin Ombui; Pradesha, Angga; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the increase occurring since February. There is wide variation across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent, and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, and the weighted average price of fertilizer has doubled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development partners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: KENYA, EAST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:1&r=
  86. By: Velandia, Margarita; Denton, Riley; DeLong, Karen L.; Trejo-Pech, Carlos O.; Tanaka, Keiko; Rignall, Karen; Chen, Xuqi; Yenerall, Jackie
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322099&r=
  87. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Duchoslav, Jan; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: MALAWI, SOUTHERN AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:10&r=
  88. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pauw, Karl; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James; Asante, Seth; Patil, Pranav
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1). Wide variation exists across products, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent, and rice prices declining by 13 percent. The price of crude oil and natural gas has also risen substantially, while the weighted average price of fertilizer has doubled. With these changes in global prices, many developing countries and their development partners are concerned about the implications for economic stability, food security, and poverty.
    Keywords: GHANA, WEST AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:9&r=
  89. By: Kandilov, Ivan T.; Richards, Hannah; Zhou, Xi; Yasar, Mahmut; Rejesus, Roderick M.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322302&r=
  90. By: Dalhaus, Tobias; Ang, Frederic; Merckelbach, Karl; Hirsch, Stefan
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Production Economics, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322402&r=
  91. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Ellis, Mia; Pauw, Karl; Thurlow, James; Smart, Jenny
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: CAMBODIA, SOUTH EAST ASIA, ASIA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:16&r=
  92. By: Malleau, Anne
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Marketing
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao22:321086&r=
  93. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Thurlow, James; Spielman, David J.; Smart, Jenny; Benimana, Gilberthe; Mugabo, Serge; Rosenbach, Gracie
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors have contributed to the crisis, such as export bans and continued supply chain disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, between June 2021 and April 2022, the global prices of palm oil and wheat increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively. At the same time, the price of fertilizer doubled, while crude oil and natural gas prices have also risen substantially. However, wide variation also exists across commodities, with real maize prices increasing by only 11 percent, and rice prices declining by 13 percent (Figure 1).
    Keywords: RWANDA, CENTRAL AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:5&r=
  94. By: Neeper, Jarral
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao22:321129&r=
  95. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Mahrt, Kristi; Minten, Bart; Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Smart, Jenny; Thurlow, James
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: MYANMAR, BURMA, SOUTHEAST ASIA, ASIA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, gross national product
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:14&r=
  96. By: Colussi, Joana; Schnitkey, Gary D.; Morgan, Eric; Padula, Antonio Dmingos
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Productivity Analysis, Teaching, Communication, and Extension
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322462&r=
  97. By: Meneses, Michael A.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Just, David R.; Kanbur, Ravi; Lee, David R.; Lawell, C.Y. Cynthia Lin
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agricultural Finance, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322208&r=
  98. By: Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Atallah, Shadi S.; Kalaitzandonakes, Maria H.; Ellison, Brenna
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Environmental Economics and Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322464&r=
  99. By: Fang, Lan; Quan, Yurong; Mao, Hui; Chen, Shaojian
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322088&r=
  100. By: Taheripour, Farzad; Steffen, Muller; Karami, Omid; Sajedinia, Ehsanreza; Emery, Isaac; Kwon, Hoyoung
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322289&r=
  101. By: Rocha, Jr., Adauto B.; Pinto, Bruno Chaves Morone; Tavares, Paulo A.; Fendrich, Arthur N.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322553&r=
  102. By: Liebrand, Carolyn
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usao22:321079&r=
  103. By: Diao, Xinshen; Dorosh, Paul A.; Pauw, Karl; Randriamamonjy, Josée; Thurlow, James; Ulimwengu, John M.
    Abstract: Global food, fuel, and fertilizer prices have risen rapidly in recent months, driven in large part by the fallout from the ongoing war in Ukraine and the sanctions imposed on Russia. Other factors, such as export bans, have also contributed to rising prices. Palm oil and wheat prices increased by 56 and 100 percent in real terms, respectively, between June 2021 and April 2022, with most of the in-crease occurring since February (Figure 1).
    Keywords: DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, CENTRAL AFRICA, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, AFRICA, Ukraine, poverty, food security, armed conflicts, crises, prices, shock, agrifood systems, equality, diet, commodities, fertilizers
    Date: 2022
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gccbrf:17&r=
  104. By: Marie-Laure Allain (CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - ENSAI - Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Analyse de l'Information [Bruz] - X - École polytechnique - ENSAE Paris - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, X - École polytechnique, IPP - Institut des politiques publiques); Rémi Avignon (CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - ENSAI - Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Analyse de l'Information [Bruz] - X - École polytechnique - ENSAE Paris - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Claire Chambolle (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Hugo Molina (UMR PSAE - Paris-Saclay Applied Economics - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Each year, commercial negotiations highlight the tensions between retailers and their suppliers, and public authorities are regularly called upon to balance the relationship. In this context, buying groups – which allow several large competing retailers to negotiate jointly with their suppliers – are likely to strengthen retailers' buyer power. France experienced two waves of buying groups formation in 2014 and in 2018 and the law was changed to allow the French Competition Authority (CA) – the Autorité de la concurrence – to control the formation of such alliances. This policy brief proposes a framework to analyse the effects of the buying groups on the sector as a whole. After a brief assessment of the economic forces at play based on a review of the literature, we discuss the results of two studies conducted by the authors of this note. The first one adopts an empirical approach to study the effects of buying groups formation in 2014 in France in the bottled water industry. It shows that the introduction of buying groups modified profit sharing at the expense of suppliers but also led to a decline in prices which benefited consumers. The second study discusses the efficiency of excluding private labels from the scope of buying groups – as advocated by the Competition Authority – to protect small suppliers and maintain product variety.
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-03693440&r=
  105. By: Reed, Joshua J.; Jaenicke, Edward C.; Liu, Yizao; Wang, Emily; Zeballos, Eliana
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322479&r=
  106. By: Costa-Font, Montserrat; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar
    Abstract: During recent years an increase in the consumption of processed potatoes products has been observed in the UK market and a parallel decrease in the consumption of fresh potatoes. This paper analyses the introduction of processed potato products in the UK market to understand its trends and the underlying reasons for its success. Results show that retailers are importantly responsible for the introduction of new potato products in the UK. Attributes such as microwaveable, on-the-go, organic, with social media presence and low or reduced-sodium have a significant and positive impact on the market success. At the same time, attributes such as light or recyclability have significant and negative effect on market success. The combination of private label and the type of packaging was non-significant. Finally, flavours are significant for the success of the products with chilli, onion, cheese cream and mint flavours show a positive impact on the market success.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321233&r=
  107. By: Shinde, Nilesh N.; Do Valle, Stella Z. Schons; Maia, Alexandre Gori; Amacher, Gregory S.
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, International Development, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322584&r=
  108. By: von Fintel, Dieter; Vink, Nick
    Abstract: There has been a substantial increase in published research on various aspects of the economies of African countries over the past couple of decades, giving rise to questions such as “who does the research” – is it scholars on and from the continent, or is it scholars from the developed world – as well as “is the research concentrated geographically” and “what is the nature and extent of collaboration between researchers”? Here, social network analysis is used to address the last of these questions in the field of the economics of African agricultural development. The results show an unexpected high degree of collaboration between African and developed country scholars, and the prominent role of international institutions, especially from the CGIAR, in fostering collaboration.
    Keywords: International Development, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2022–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aesc22:321229&r=
  109. By: Gadea Rivas, Marta Dolores; Gonzalo, Jesús
    Abstract: Climate change is a non-uniform phenomenon. This paper proposes a newquantitative methodology to characterize, measure and test the existence ofclimate change heterogeneity. It consists of three steps. First, we introduce anew testable warming typology based on the evolution of the trend of the whole temperature distribution and not only on the average. Second, we define the concepts of warming acceleration and warming amplification in a testable format. And third, we introduce the new testable concept of warming dominance to determine whether region A is suffering a worse warming process than region B. Applying this three-step methodology, we find that Spain and the Globe experience a clear distributional warming process (beyond the standard average) but of different types. In both cases, this process is accelerating over time and asymmetrically amplified. Overall, warming in Spain dominates the Globe in all the quantiles except the lower tail of the global temperature distribution that corresponds to the Artic region. Our climate change heterogeneity results open the door to the need for a non-uniform causal-effect climate analysis that goes beyond the standard causality in mean as well as for a more efficient design of the mitigation-adaptation policies. In particular, the heterogeneity we find suggests that these policies should contain a common global component and a clear local-regional element. Future climate agreements should take the whole temperature distribution into account.
    Keywords: Climate Change; Climate Heterogeneity; Global-Local Warming; Functional Stochastic Processes; Distributional Characteristics; Trends; Quantiles; Temperature Distributions
    JEL: C31 C32 Q54
    Date: 2022–07–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cte:werepe:35442&r=
  110. By: Song, Siwan; Villarreal, Elizabeth N.A. Tabares; Melo, Grace; Ishdorj, Ariun
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2022–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea22:322542&r=

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