nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2021‒12‒13
83 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Why Governments Should Penalize Animal Production: A Systemic Approach to Internalize the Externalities of Agriculture By Mann, Stefan
  2. Organic Farming and Food and Nutrition Security By Henningsen, Arne; Aihounton, Ghislain
  3. Identifying the Income Effect on Nutrition for Agricultural Households: Separability of Production and Consumption By Thottappilly, Anna
  4. Nationally Representative Estimates of the Cost of Adequate Diets, Nutrient Level Drivers, and Policy Options for Households in Rural Malawi By Schneider, Kate
  5. Seeds, Water, and Markets to Increase Wheat Productivity in Bihar, India By Singh, Vartika; Kishore, Avinash
  6. The Nexus of Production Diversity, Market Participation and Dietary Diversity: Insights from Ethiopia By Getahun, Tigabu; Fetene, Gebeyehu
  7. Free Power, Irrigation and Groundwater Depletion: Impact of the Farm Electricity Policy of Punjab, India By Gupta, Disha
  8. Farmers’ Participation in the Income Stabilization Tool: Evidence from the Apple Sector in Italy By Rippo, Ruggiero; Cerroni, Simone
  9. Prioritization of Agricultural Investment By Region By Maruyama, Eduardo; Schollard, Phoebe
  10. Meta-Analysis of Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Sustainable Food Products By Li, Shanshan; Kallas, Zein
  11. Agricultural Policy Processes: Influential Actors, Policy Networks and Competing Narratives By Mockshell, Jonathan; Birner, Regina
  12. Resilience to Food Insecurity and Households’ Head Gender: Insides from Food Assistance in Malawi By Ximena, Monserrath Lascano Galarza
  13. Urban Differential Effects on Food Demand in Nigeria By Ikudayisi, Adesola; Okoruwa, Victor O.
  14. Adoption of Multiple Agricultural Technologies and Impact on Productivity in Rural Nigeria – a Plot-Level Analysis By Amankwah, Akuffo
  15. Cereal Land Allocation Under Weather and Price Uncertainties in West Africa By Hodjo, Manzamasso; Dalton, Timothy
  16. Accuracy of in Medias RES and EX-Post Cost-Benefit Analyses: A Case of National Special Programme for Food Security, Nigeria By Coker, Ayodeji
  17. Group Farming in France: Why Do Some Regions Have More Cooperative Ventures Than Others? By Dorin, Bruno; Agarwal, Bina
  18. Context and Technology Traits Explain Heterogeneity across Adoption Studies of Agricultural Innovations: A Global Meta-Analysis By Schulz, Dario; Börner, Jan
  19. Cost Impact of Inefficiency in Small-Scale Paddy Rice Production in Edo State, Nigeria By Ojogho, Osaihiiomwan; Imade, Osagie
  20. Fiscal Policies to Fight Malnutrition: An Analysis of the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Tax in Catalonia, Spain By Dal, Eléonore
  21. Policy Analysis with Melitz-Type Gravity Model: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan By Kimsanova, Barchynai; Herzfeld, Thomas
  22. Challenges to ‘Going Local’: Lessons from Direct Food Sourcing Initiatives in Cusco, Peru By Blare, Trent; Donovan, Jason
  23. Societal Perception of Biotech Corn Farmers Towards the Philippine Supreme Court Ban on Biotech Crops By Gonzalvo, Clarisse; Aala, Wilson
  24. Does Institutional Credit Induce on-Farm Investments? Evidence from India By Cariappa, A. G. Adeeth; Sendhil, R
  25. Women’s Participation in Bihar Agriculture: Evidences from Cost of Cultivation data By Kumari, Priyanka; Singh, K.M.; Ahmad, Nasim; Shekhar, Dinbyanshu; Atre, Santosh Kumar
  26. "Feed the Mouth, the Eye Ashamed": Have Food Prices Triggered Social Unrest in Egypt? By Hatab, Assem Abu; Hess, Sebastian
  27. More Crop per Drop : A Myth of Groundwater Irrigation By S, Anitha; Chandrakanth, M. G.
  28. Shrinking Working-Age Population and Food Demand: Evidence from Rural China By Han, Xinru; Li, Guojing
  29. Self-Control and Vulnerability to Food Insecurity: Exploring Impacts and Pathways By Meyer, Stefan; Santos, Paulo
  30. Determinants of Regional Raw Milk Prices in Russia By Kresova, Svetlana; Hess, Sebastian
  31. Investment Impacts of Gendered Land Rights in Customary Tenure Systems: Substantive and Methodological Insights from Malawi By Xia, Fang
  32. Industry Levy Versus Banning Promotion on Soft Drinks in the Scotland: A Distributional Analysis By Dogbe, Wisdom; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar
  33. Impact of Grassland Transfer on Technical Efficiency of Livestock Production in Northern China By Feng, Xiaolong
  34. Estimating on-Farm Storage Losses in Maize Using Community Surveys in Kenya By Muteti, Francisca; Groote, Hugo de
  35. Intra-Household Decision-Making and Dietary Diversity: Evidence from Five Developing Countries in Asia By Zeng, Xuanye
  36. Sustainable Agriculture Decision Support Tool By Anu Rangarajan; Tulika Narayan
  37. Volatility-reducing biodiversity conservation under strategic interactions By Emmanuelle Augeraud-Véron; Giorgio Fabbri; Katheline Schubert
  38. Maize Price Seasonality in Ethiopia: Does Access to Improved Grain Storage Technology Matter for Farmers’ Welfare? By Negede, Betelhem Mulugeta
  39. The Transformations of Customary Land Rights in Africa: An Analytical Framework By Conning, Jonathan; Baker, Matthew J.
  40. News from the Sky: An Empirical Test of Forward-Looking Behavior Among Zambian Farmers By Miura, Ken; Sakurai, Takeshi
  41. The dynamics of direct selling for wine-growing farms By Magali Aubert; Geoffroy Enjolras
  42. Determinants of Agricultural Diversification in Brazil: A Spatial Econometric Analysis By Parré, José Luiz; Chagas, André Luis Squarize
  43. On the Risk Efficiency of a Weather Index Insurance Product for the Brazilian Semi-Arid Region By Lavorato, Mateus; Braga, Marcelo José
  44. Nitrogen Surplus Displays a Spurious Environmental Kuznets Curve in Germany By Campos, Bente Castro; Petrick, Martin
  45. Trends in Female Labour Absorption in Rice Cultivation: Evidence from India By Singaraju, Niyati; Bora, Kaushik
  46. Climate Anomalies and Their Impact on Cereal Grain Prices By Zhu, Yichen; Ghoshray, Atanu
  47. Obesity and Life Expectancy: Why Disaggregation Methods? By Bansal, Sangeeta; Zilberman, David
  48. An Amazon Tipping Point: The Economic and Environmental Fallout By Onil Banerjee; Martin Cicowiez; Marcia Macedo; Žiga Malek; Peter Verburg; Sean Goodwin; Renato Vargas; Ludmila Rattis; Paulo M. Brando; Michael T. Coe; Christopher Neill; Octavio Damiani
  49. Redistributive Impacts of Policies on Producers and Consumers: Lessons from Indian Value Chains By Tokgoz, Simla; Majeed, Fahd
  50. Measuring Agricultural Labor: Self and Proxy Reporting By Dervisevic, Ervin; Goldstein, Markus
  51. Don't Bite the Hand That Feeds You: Food Pantries and Food Retailer Profitability By Kopp, Thomas; Chenarides, Lauren
  52. Strengthening climate resilience in mountainous areas By Takayoshi Kato; Mikaela Rambali; Victor Blanco-Gonzalez
  53. Farm-Level Impacts of Shifts in Conservation Policy Regimes in Brazil’s Arc of Deforestation By Miranda, Javier; Börner, Jan
  54. Cash Transfers, Climatic Shocks and Resilience in the Sahel By Stoeffler, Quentin; Premand, Patrick
  55. Impacts of Cooking Fuel Choices on Subjective Well-Being: Insights from Rural China By Vatsa, Puneet; Ma, Wanglin
  56. Dyadic Analysis of a Speed-Dating Format between Farmers and Citizens: Impacts of Conversations’ and Participants’ Characteristics on Outcome Indicators after Four Months By Mergenthaler, Marcus
  57. System-Wide Market and Welfare Effects of a U.S. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Tax By Lee, Yunkyung; Giannakas, Konstantinos
  58. Climate variability impacts on agricultural output in East Africa By Mubenga-Tshitaka, Jean Luc; Dikgang, Johane; Muteba Mwamba, John W.; Gelo, Dambala
  59. Irrigation, Nutrition, Gender and COVID-19 in a Small Central Asian Country: Insights from Tadjikistan By Takeshima, Hiroyuki
  60. Factors Influencing Smallholder Potato Farmers’ Choice Decisions of Market Outlets in Musanze and Nyabihu Districts, Rwanda: A Multivariate Probit MODEL By Mugenzi, Patrice
  61. Forecasting Regional Milk Production Quantity: A Comparison of Regression Models and Machine Learning By Baaken, Dominik; Hess, Sebastian
  62. Demand for Plant Based Beverages and Market Competition in Fluid Milk Markets By Khanal, Binod; Lopez, Rigoberto
  63. Economic Sanctions and Agricultural Trade By Mario Larch; Jeff Luckstead; Yoto V. Yotov
  64. Effects of a Government-Led Parenting Programme on Early Child Development Outcomes in Rural China: A Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial By Bai, Yu
  65. Health Implications of Obesity: An Evidence from India By Gupta, Shivani; Bansal, Sangeeta
  66. Enhancing spatial coordination in payment for ecosystem services schemes with non-pecuniary preferences By Laure Kuhfuss; Raphaële Préget; Sophie Thoyer; Frans de Vries; Nick Hanley
  67. The Market Dynamics of Tariff Rate Quotas in the Case of Ceta By Döbeling, Tatjana; Pelikan, Janine
  68. Access to Finance and Rural Youth Entrepreneurship in Benin: Is There a Gender Gap? By Senou, Melain Modeste; Manda, Julius
  69. Social Inequalities in Climate Change-Attributed Impacts of Hurricane Harvey By Kevin T. Smiley; Ilan Noy; Michael Wehner; Dave Frame; Christopher Sampson; Oliver E. Wing
  70. An Economic Analysis of the 'buy Local' Trend By Ray, Susweta; Giannakas, Konstantinos
  71. Risk, Uncertainty, and Biofuels’ Supply Chains. By Lee, Yuanyao; Khanna, Madhu
  72. The Impact of E-Verify Immigration Policy on the U.S. Agricultural Labor Shortage By Paik, SongYi; Lim, Sunghun
  73. The benefits of the digital supply chain for horizontal resource pooling – the case of the Bio Loire Océan Farmers’ Association By Virginie Noireaux; Joseph Edzengte Edzengte
  74. Climatic shocks, air quality, and health at birth in Bogotá By Luis Guillermo Becerra-Valbuena; Jorge A. Bonilla
  75. The Way Forward for WTO Reform: Agricultural Subsidies and Special and Differential Treatments By Suh, Jin Kyo; Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Min-Sung
  76. Analysis of Youth Participation in Agripreneurship in Benin By Akrong, Rexford; Kotu, Bekele Hundie
  77. Estimating Long-Term Economic Statistics of Japanese Agriculture: 1963-2011 By Takayama, Koki; Takahashi, Daisuke
  78. Better to grow or better to improve? Measuring environmental efficiency in OECD countries with a Stochastic Environmental Kuznets Frontier By Oleg Badunenko; Marzio Galeotti; Lester C. Hunt
  79. There is no Plan(et) B: youth activism in the fight against climate change in Cyprus By Eleni Theodorou; Spyros Spyrou; Georgina Christou
  80. Global regime diffusion in space: a missed transition in San Diego’s water sector By Johan Miörner; Jonas Heiberg; Christian Binz
  81. Gender Gap in Health Outcomes Among the Rural Working Age Individuals: Does Weather Effects Play a Role? By Amondo, Emily Injete
  82. The replicability crisis and the p-value debate – what are the consequences for the agricultural and food economics community? By Heckelei, Thomas; Huettel, Silke; Odening, Martin; Rommel, Jens
  83. ENTREPRENEURSHIP, MARKET SELECTION AND INCOME MOBILITY -EVIDENCE FROM RURAL CHINA * By Yong He; Guang-Zhen Sun

  1. By: Mann, Stefan
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315160&r=
  2. By: Henningsen, Arne; Aihounton, Ghislain
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315413&r=
  3. By: Thottappilly, Anna
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315335&r=
  4. By: Schneider, Kate
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315035&r=
  5. By: Singh, Vartika; Kishore, Avinash
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315022&r=
  6. By: Getahun, Tigabu; Fetene, Gebeyehu
    Abstract: This study examines the nexus among production diversity, market participation, and consumption diversity in smallholder households. It identifies the main factors that influence smallholder farm households’ decision to diversify production and evaluates the effect of production diversity and market participation on consumption diversity. To this end, we use a three-wave panel data of 7110 households in rural Ethiopia. The estimation results from the Mundlak Fixed Effects instrumental method suggest that risk-averse households, households with larger cultivated land, households with larger family size and family labor, and households who participate in community meetings are more likely to diversify their production. The results further reveal that production diversity has a statistically significant and positive effect on the consumption diversity of household members, but not dietary diversity of children and women. We find that market integration is more relevant in improving nutrition than production diversity. These results suggest that policies that merely focus on encouraging smallholder farmers to diversify production would not be that effective unless they are coupled with interventions that aim to integrate smallholder farmers to the market.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–12–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ubzefd:316382&r=
  7. By: Gupta, Disha
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315001&r=
  8. By: Rippo, Ruggiero; Cerroni, Simone
    Keywords: Farm Management, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315191&r=
  9. By: Maruyama, Eduardo; Schollard, Phoebe
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315292&r=
  10. By: Li, Shanshan; Kallas, Zein
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314970&r=
  11. By: Mockshell, Jonathan; Birner, Regina
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315323&r=
  12. By: Ximena, Monserrath Lascano Galarza
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315274&r=
  13. By: Ikudayisi, Adesola; Okoruwa, Victor O.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315142&r=
  14. By: Amankwah, Akuffo
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315178&r=
  15. By: Hodjo, Manzamasso; Dalton, Timothy
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315177&r=
  16. By: Coker, Ayodeji
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314936&r=
  17. By: Dorin, Bruno; Agarwal, Bina
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Farm Management
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315072&r=
  18. By: Schulz, Dario; Börner, Jan
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315003&r=
  19. By: Ojogho, Osaihiiomwan; Imade, Osagie
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314938&r=
  20. By: Dal, Eléonore
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315005&r=
  21. By: Kimsanova, Barchynai; Herzfeld, Thomas
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315046&r=
  22. By: Blare, Trent; Donovan, Jason
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315388&r=
  23. By: Gonzalvo, Clarisse; Aala, Wilson
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315023&r=
  24. By: Cariappa, A. G. Adeeth; Sendhil, R
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315221&r=
  25. By: Kumari, Priyanka; Singh, K.M.; Ahmad, Nasim; Shekhar, Dinbyanshu; Atre, Santosh Kumar
    Abstract: Understanding the nature of rural landscape change during the urbanization process is vital to formulate more elaborate rural landscape management plans for sustainable development. According to the 2011 Socio-Economic Caste Census (SECC), there were 244.9 million households in India of which 179.7 million households or 833 million people were in rural areas. The SECC numbers show that 87.2 million rural households reported one of more criteria of deprivation, and 92 million households are engaged in casual manual labour and agricultural activities. In Indian agriculture, women contribute in every agricultural operation and are also active in allied sectors like cattle management, dairying, beekeeping, goat rearing mushroom production and poultry farming etc. Women participation in total workforce was assessed 27.44% as against 72.56% by male workforce in 2011. Share of women agricultural workforce in total workforce was computed to be 16.57% in 2001 which declined to 6.23% in 2011. Causes of decline may be their participation other sectors with improvement in their literacy rate which rose to 51.50% in 2011 as compared to 33.57% in 2001. The male-female sex ratio has registered a decline of 0.11% as compared to 2001 census. Women holding land account for only 13.31% as against 87.27% by men in Bihar. Share of women agricultural workforce in total agricultural workforce was estimated to be 19.32% as per census 2011. Analysis of CACP unit level data of Bihar for the year 2013-14, revealed that the contribution of women in agricultural activities was assessed to be 35.94%. Women’s contribution in agriculture is significant and plays diverse role, still their wages were found 7.04% less than their male counterparts during 2015-16. To strengthen women’s participation in agriculture and allied sectors and to improve their access to land, loan and other facilities, Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare has policy provisions like joint leasing for both domestic and agricultural land under National policy for farmers. The present paper tries to analyse the role women in agricultural development of Bihar and the issues confronting them.
    Keywords: Gender studies, Women in Agriculture
    JEL: O15 Q12
    Date: 2020–01–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:110629&r=
  26. By: Hatab, Assem Abu; Hess, Sebastian
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315082&r=
  27. By: S, Anitha; Chandrakanth, M. G.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315211&r=
  28. By: Han, Xinru; Li, Guojing
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315000&r=
  29. By: Meyer, Stefan; Santos, Paulo
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315194&r=
  30. By: Kresova, Svetlana; Hess, Sebastian
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315064&r=
  31. By: Xia, Fang
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315327&r=
  32. By: Dogbe, Wisdom; Revoredo-Giha, Cesar
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314972&r=
  33. By: Feng, Xiaolong
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315368&r=
  34. By: Muteti, Francisca; Groote, Hugo de
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315309&r=
  35. By: Zeng, Xuanye
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315393&r=
  36. By: Anu Rangarajan; Tulika Narayan
    Abstract: Agricultural technologies can contribute significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. This brief describes a decision support tool that quantifies and monetizes such impacts to inform scale-up of innovative technologies that deliver “win–win†agricultural and environmental outcomes.
    Keywords: Climate Change, Greenhouse gas emissions, Sustainable agriculture, West Africa
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:mpr:mprres:c81f7f0beed9445585eb24d0778d24c1&r=
  37. By: Emmanuelle Augeraud-Véron (GREThA - Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée - UB - Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Giorgio Fabbri (GAEL - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée de Grenoble - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes - Grenoble INP - Institut polytechnique de Grenoble - Grenoble Institute of Technology - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes); Katheline Schubert (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: How can decentralized individual decisions inefficiently reduce the ability of biodiversity to mitigate ecological and environmental variability and then its "natural insurance" role? In this article we present a simple theoretical setup to address this question and to evaluate some policy options. We study a model of strategic competition among farmers for the conversion of a natural forest to agricultural land. Unconverted forest land allows to conserve biodiversity, which contributes to reducing the volatility of agricultural production. Agents' utility is given in terms of a Kreps Porteus stochastic differential utility capable of disentangling risk aversion and aversion to fluctuations. We characterize the land used by each farmer and her welfare at the Nash equilibrium, we evaluate the overexploitation of the land and the agents' welfare loss compared to the socially optimal solution and we study the drivers of the inefficiencies of the decentralized equilibrium. After characterizing the value of biodiversity in the model, we use it to obtain a decomposition which helps to study the policy implications of the model by identifying in which cases the allocation of property rights is preferable to the introduction of a tax on land conversion. Our results suggest that enforcing property rights is more relevant in case of stagnant economies while taxing land conversion may be more suited for rapidly developing economies.
    Keywords: Stochastic differential games,Recursive preferences,Land conversion,Insurance value,Biodiversity
    Date: 2021–08–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:pseptp:hal-03369958&r=
  38. By: Negede, Betelhem Mulugeta
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315240&r=
  39. By: Conning, Jonathan; Baker, Matthew J.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315325&r=
  40. By: Miura, Ken; Sakurai, Takeshi
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315161&r=
  41. By: Magali Aubert (UMR MoISA - Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (Social and nutritional sciences) - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - CIHEAM-IAMM - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Institut Agronomique Méditerranéen de Montpellier - CIHEAM - Centre International de Hautes Études Agronomiques Méditerranéennes - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Geoffroy Enjolras (UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes, CERAG - Centre d'études et de recherches appliquées à la gestion - UGA - Université Grenoble Alpes)
    Abstract: Direct selling is a marketing strategy that is developing quickly, especially in the wine-growing sector. While many studies have focused on the factors and strategies leading to the adoption of short food supply chains, this study aims to study the dynamics and sustainability over time of direct selling as adopted by wine-growing farms. The data examined relates to French farms within the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN) operating continuously over the period 2006 to 2012. The analysis calls on a two-step Heckman selection model that considers the duration of the direct selling adoption, conditioned by the farmers' initial decision to adopt such marketing strategy or not. The results emphasise the fact that size is a key factor driving the conversion to direct selling. This marketing channel is chosen by wine-growing farms keen to increase their acreage but to decrease their economic and financial size, as well as their use of phytosanitary products. These results reflect the emergence of a specific model of small wine-growing farms centred on the adoption of direct selling.
    Keywords: France,Heckman,Farm size,Wine-growing,Direct selling
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03380304&r=
  42. By: Parré, José Luiz; Chagas, André Luis Squarize
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315290&r=
  43. By: Lavorato, Mateus; Braga, Marcelo José
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315193&r=
  44. By: Campos, Bente Castro; Petrick, Martin
    Keywords: Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315111&r=
  45. By: Singaraju, Niyati; Bora, Kaushik
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315409&r=
  46. By: Zhu, Yichen; Ghoshray, Atanu
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315271&r=
  47. By: Bansal, Sangeeta; Zilberman, David
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315276&r=
  48. By: Onil Banerjee (Inter-American Development Bank); Martin Cicowiez (CEDLAS-IIE-FCE-UNLP); Marcia Macedo (Woodwell Climate Research Centre, Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM)); Žiga Malek (Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM)); Peter Verburg (Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM)); Sean Goodwin (Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM)); Renato Vargas (CHW Research); Ludmila Rattis (Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM)); Paulo M. Brando (University of California); Michael T. Coe (Universit´e Paris-Dauphine); Christopher Neill (Woodwell Climate Research Centre); Octavio Damiani (Inter-American Development Bank)
    Abstract: The Amazon biome, despite its resilience, is being pushed by unsustainable economic drivers towards an ecological tipping point where restoration to its previous state may no longer possible. This is the result of self-reinforcing interactions between deforestation, climate change and fire. In this paper, we develop scenarios that represent movement towards an Amazon tipping point and strategies to avert one. We assess the economic, natural capital and ecosystem services impacts of these scenarios using the Integrated Economic-Environmental Modeling (IEEM) Platform linked with high resolution spatial land use land cover change and ecosystem services modeling (IEEM+ESM). This paper’s main contributions are developing: (i) a framework for evaluating strategies to avert an Amazon tipping point based on their relative costs, benefits and trade-offs, and; (ii) a first approximation of the economic, natural capital and ecosystem services impacts of movement towards an Amazon tipping point, and evidence to build the economic case for strategies to avert it. We find that a conservative estimate of the cumulative regional cost through 2050 of an Amazon tipping point would be US$256.6 billion in Gross Domestic Product. Policies that would contribute to averting a tipping point, including strongly reducing deforestation, investing in climate-adapted agriculture, and improving fire management, would generate approximately US$339.3 billion in additional wealth. From a public investment perspective, the returns to implementing strategies for averting a tipping point would be US$29.5 billion. Quantifying the costs, benefits and trade-offs of policies to avert a tipping point in a transparent and replicable manner can pave the way for evidence-based approaches to support policy action focusing on the design of regional strategies for the Amazon biome and catalyze global cooperation and financing to enable their implementation.
    JEL: C68 Q5 O13 Q54
    Date: 2020–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:dls:wpaper:0292&r=
  49. By: Tokgoz, Simla; Majeed, Fahd
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315115&r=
  50. By: Dervisevic, Ervin; Goldstein, Markus
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315396&r=
  51. By: Kopp, Thomas; Chenarides, Lauren
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314950&r=
  52. By: Takayoshi Kato; Mikaela Rambali; Victor Blanco-Gonzalez
    Abstract: Mountainous areas are at the forefront of climate change. This working paper presents approaches to strengthening the resilience of human and natural systems in mountainous areas against the impacts of climate change. Chapter 1 provides an overview of climate-related hazards to ecosystems and communities in mountainous areas, especially in developing countries, and their exposure and vulnerability to those hazards. The chapter then examines various ways governments and development co‑operation providers can strengthen the climate resilience of mountain communities and ecosystems. Chapter 2 presents the case of the Indian state of Uttarakhand.
    JEL: Q01 Q56 Q54 R11 F63 F64
    Date: 2021–12–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oec:dcdaaa:104-en&r=
  53. By: Miranda, Javier; Börner, Jan
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315225&r=
  54. By: Stoeffler, Quentin; Premand, Patrick
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315354&r=
  55. By: Vatsa, Puneet; Ma, Wanglin
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315149&r=
  56. By: Mergenthaler, Marcus
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315202&r=
  57. By: Lee, Yunkyung; Giannakas, Konstantinos
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315203&r=
  58. By: Mubenga-Tshitaka, Jean Luc; Dikgang, Johane; Muteba Mwamba, John W.; Gelo, Dambala
    Abstract: This paper investigates whether the effects of weather variability in temperature and precipitation on agricultural output are short- or long-run. In fact, the study addresses two policy-relevant questions: (1) Does temperature or precipitation variability affect agricultural output, and if so, is the effect short- or long-term? (2) Is the effect of weather variability on agricultural output homogenous across East Africa? However, there is clear evidence of cross-country dependency. If cross-sectional dependency exists among the cross-sectional countries under investigation, the first generation of panel data techniques is not applicable. We use data from the FAOSTAT for 1961 to 2016 for East African countries, while climate-related variables (temperature and precipitation) are from the Climate Research Unit (CRU). We find that variability in temperature has a long-run impact on agricultural output, while variability in precipitation has a short-run effect. However, after considering the heterogeneity among countries, there is evidence of the long-run effect of precipitation variability in some countries.
    Keywords: Climate variability, agricultural output, cross-sectional dependency, heterogeneity
    JEL: Q1 Q2 Q54
    Date: 2021–11–20
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:110771&r=
  59. By: Takeshima, Hiroyuki
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315106&r=
  60. By: Mugenzi, Patrice
    Keywords: Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315163&r=
  61. By: Baaken, Dominik; Hess, Sebastian
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315117&r=
  62. By: Khanal, Binod; Lopez, Rigoberto
    Keywords: Marketing, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315369&r=
  63. By: Mario Larch; Jeff Luckstead; Yoto V. Yotov
    Abstract: Combining two new datasets on sanctions and agricultural trade and implementing step-by-step the latest developments in the empirical structural gravity literature, we investigate the effects of sanctions on international trade of agricultural products. We find that trade sanctions have been effective in impeding agricultural trade, while other sanctions do not show any significant effects. The complete trade sanctions in our sample have led to about a 73% decrease in the agricultural trade between the sanctioned and sanctioning countries, or a corresponding tariff equivalent of 38.8%, but we also obtain significant estimates for partial sanctions. At the industry level, we find substantial heterogeneity depending on the sanctioning and sanctioned countries, the type of sanctions used, and the direction of trade flows. Focusing on the sanctions on Russia, we find that these sanctions substantially decreased bilateral trade of Russia, mainly due to reduced trade with the EU.
    Keywords: structural gravity, sanctions, agriculture, Russia, heterogeneity
    JEL: F14 F51 Q17
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_9410&r=
  64. By: Bai, Yu
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315366&r=
  65. By: Gupta, Shivani; Bansal, Sangeeta
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315130&r=
  66. By: Laure Kuhfuss (The James Hutton Institute); Raphaële Préget (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Sophie Thoyer (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Frans de Vries (University of Stirling); Nick Hanley (University of St Andrews [Scotland])
    Abstract: he environmental benefits from Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes can often be enhanced if private land managers are induced to enrol land in a spatially coordinated manner. One incentive mechanism which has been proposed to achieve such spatial coordination is the agglomeration bonus, a two-part payment scheme which offers a pecuniary (financial) reward for decisions that lead to greater spatial coordination of enrolled land. However, farmers respond to a range of motives when deciding whether to participate in such schemes, including non-pecuniary motives such as a concern for the environment or social comparisons. This study implements a de-contextualised laboratory experiment to test the effectiveness of the agglomeration bonus when non-pecuniary motives are explicitly incorporated into the decision-making environment. We capture intrinsic preferences for the public good dimension of environmental improvement through a real donation to environmental charities and examine the relative impact of a group-ranking nudge. The experimental results show that the agglomeration bonus does indeed improve participation and spatial coordination when non-pecuniary motives are accounted for, but that its performance is not enhanced by the nudge.
    Keywords: Agglomeration Bonus,Coordination Games,Environmental Preferences,Laboratory Experiments,Social Comparison,Nudge,spatial Coordination
    Date: 2022–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03435954&r=
  67. By: Döbeling, Tatjana; Pelikan, Janine
    Keywords: Marketing, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315282&r=
  68. By: Senou, Melain Modeste; Manda, Julius
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315077&r=
  69. By: Kevin T. Smiley; Ilan Noy; Michael Wehner; Dave Frame; Christopher Sampson; Oliver E. Wing
    Abstract: Climate change is already increasing the severity of extreme weather events such as with rainfall during hurricanes. But no research to date investigates if, and to what extent, there are social inequalities in current climate change-attributed flood impacts. Here, we use climate change attribution science paired with hydrological flood models to estimate climate change-attributed flood depths and damages during Hurricane Harvey in Harris County, Texas. We then combine this information with detailed land-parcel and census tract socio-economic data to describe the socio-spatial characteristics of these climate change-induced impacts. Our findings show that 30 to 50% of the flooded properties would not have flooded without climate change. These climate change-attributed impacts were particularly felt in Latinx neighborhoods, and especially so in Latinx neighborhoods that were low-income and among those located outside of FEMA’s 100-year floodplain (and therefore less likely to be insured). An important implication is the need to focus on pressing climate justice challenges that not only concern future climate change-induced risks, but are already affecting vulnerable populations disproportionately now.
    Keywords: Hurricane Harvey, attribution, climate change, poverty, flood insurance
    JEL: Q54
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ces:ceswps:_9412&r=
  70. By: Ray, Susweta; Giannakas, Konstantinos
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315332&r=
  71. By: Lee, Yuanyao; Khanna, Madhu
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315310&r=
  72. By: Paik, SongYi; Lim, Sunghun
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315125&r=
  73. By: Virginie Noireaux (CleRMa - Clermont Recherche Management - ESC Clermont-Ferrand - École Supérieure de Commerce (ESC) - Clermont-Ferrand - UCA [2017-2020] - Université Clermont Auvergne [2017-2020]); Joseph Edzengte Edzengte
    Date: 2020–07–24
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03420554&r=
  74. By: Luis Guillermo Becerra-Valbuena (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Jorge A. Bonilla (ULA - Universidad de Los Andes [Venezuela])
    Abstract: We contribute to the literature on air pollution and health by assessing an additional channel, the effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on health. Currently, there is a vast literature on the effects of urban pollution on health. Our research, unlike other studies, jointly investigates the effects of pollution, ENSO and local weather on health. On the one hand, ENSO manifests itself as an extreme climatic shock that follows certain seasonality and influences weather. It may also have an impact on floods, droughts and agriculture inducing changes in food markets or a loss of household income, which also affect health. On the other hand, health outcomes are affected by other factors which follow separate mechanisms to the previous ones. Therefore, pollutant impacts on health may be interpreted as separate effects from other shocks mediated through ENSO. Using a database from 1998 to 2015 on air quality and vital statistics for Bogotá, and ENSO information, we find that across several specifications, ENSO affects birth weight and the probability of low birth weight after separating pollution and classical local weather impacts. Interestingly, the effect on birth weight of ENSO are several times larger than the impacts of pollution. Being exposed to ENSO may decrease birth weight up to 1.3%, while an increase of 1 ppb of SO2 or 1 µg/m3 of PM25 might reduce birth weight up to 0.3% or 0.14%, respectively. From a policy point of view, these results are relevant because regardless of the measure of pollution that we employ, the amount of the impacts exhibited by climatic shocks via ENSO events dominate.
    Keywords: Climate change,Health,ENSO Index,El Niño,La Niña,weather,Pollution,Bogotá
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-03429482&r=
  75. By: Suh, Jin Kyo (KOREA INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY (KIEP)); Park, Ji Hyun (KOREA INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY (KIEP)); Kim, Min-Sung (KOREA INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY (KIEP))
    Abstract: The multilateral trading system has been in crisis. The world economy has changed significantly since the WTO replaced the previous GATT system and new challenges are quickly piling on top of the old ones. The rising emerging countries and the relative decline of traditional economic members, together with the need to deal with complex new issues such as climate change and e-commerce and digital trade, are shaking the foundations on which the WTO was built some 25 years ago. There is also growing momentum among many WTO members to 'modernize' the WTO, including the Appellate Body although the details and feasibility of reform are unclear at this stage. In this perspective, we suggest some ideas on both trade-distorting farm subsidies and S&DT which are the two important issues in the WTO negotiations.
    Keywords: WTO; reform; agricultural subsidy; treatment
    Date: 2020–10–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ris:kiepwe:2020_029&r=
  76. By: Akrong, Rexford; Kotu, Bekele Hundie
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315090&r=
  77. By: Takayama, Koki; Takahashi, Daisuke
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315333&r=
  78. By: Oleg Badunenko (Brunel University); Marzio Galeotti (University of Milan); Lester C. Hunt (University of Portsmouth)
    Abstract: The standard approach to the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) holds that as a country develops and GDP per capita grows environmental degradation initially increases but eventually it reaches a turning point where environmental degradation begins to decline. Environmental degradation takes many forms, one of them being emissions of harmful gases. According to the EKC concept, a country can reduce emissions by ‘growing’. The standard approach implicitly assumes that a country emits as little as possible for its economic development, whereas in reality, a country might emit above the best attainable level of emissions. Therefore, emissions could be reduced before and after the turning point by becoming more environmentally efficient – i.e., ‘improving’ the emissions level. This article proposes a Stochastic Environmental Kuznets Frontier (SEKF) which is estimated for CO2 emissions for OECD countries and used to benchmark each country before and after the turning point differently, thus, indicating how a country could ‘grow’ and/or ‘improve’ to reduce its CO2 emissions. Additionally, we analyse the role of the stringency of environmental policies in reducing a country’s carbon inefficiency measured by the distance from the benchmark EKC and find widespread carbon inefficiencies that could be reduced by more stringent market-based environmental policies.
    Keywords: Environment and growth, Environmental Kuznets Curve, CO2 emissions, Panel data, OECD countries, Stochastic frontier approach, Stochastic Environmental Kuznets Frontier, Environmental Policy Stringency
    JEL: O44 Q56 Q54 C13 C33
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fem:femwpa:2021.28&r=
  79. By: Eleni Theodorou; Spyros Spyrou; Georgina Christou
    Abstract: This research paper explores young people’s climate action in Cyprus in light of the global mobilization of children and youth and the emergence of the international Fridays for Future movement. The study on which the paper draws explored in particular the emergence and role of ‘Youth for Climate Cyprus’ in climate action on the island through the use of ethnographic and other qualitative approaches including ethnographic observation, in-depth individual interviews and focus group discussions as well as textual analysis of social media posts and local media coverage of youth climate activism. The paper examines the meaning that young activists make of their activism on climate change, the forms their activism takes, and the means through which they organize and mobilize around the cause of climate change including their strategies for gaining legitimacy.
    Keywords: Youth climate activism, youth social movements, climate change, climate justice, Cyprus
    Date: 2021–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hel:greese:166&r=
  80. By: Johan Miörner (Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland); Jonas Heiberg (Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland); Christian Binz (Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland)
    Abstract: Socio-technical regimes are potentially global sets of highly institutionalized rationalities that have co-evolved with actors, technologies and institutions. Transition studies features an extensive focus on regimes dynamics within specific territorial contexts. However, we know surprisingly little of how regime rationalities are constructed, diffused and reproduced across geographical contexts. This is a key gap in the literature on the geography of sustainability transitions, in explaining why transitions happen in some places and not in others. This paper introduces a conceptual model to analyze transformative opportunities in regions and how regime actors strategically diffuse and implement regime solutions through combinations of discursive- and system building activities. The empirical analysis draws upon a combination of Socio-Technical Configuration Analysis (STCA) of 354 newspaper articles and 10 in-depth interviews to illuminate how regime actors prevailed in diffusing and legitimizing the water sector’s dominant socio-technical configuration in San Diego during a period of substantial transformation pressure.
    Keywords: global regimes, regime diffusion, regional discourse dynamics, desalination, San Diego, socio-technical configuration analysis
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:aoe:wpaper:2108&r=
  81. By: Amondo, Emily Injete
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315096&r=
  82. By: Heckelei, Thomas; Huettel, Silke; Odening, Martin; Rommel, Jens
    Abstract: A vivid debate is ongoing in the scientific community about statistical malpractice and the related publication bias. No general consensus exists on the consequences and this is reflected in heterogeneous rules defined by scientific journals on the use and reporting of statistical inference. This paper aims at discussing how the debate is perceived by the agricultural economics community and implications for our roles as researchers, contributors to the scientific publication process, and teachers. We start by summarizing the current state of the p-value debate and the replication crisis, and commonly applied statistical practices in our community. This is followed by motivation, design, results and discussion of a survey on statistical knowledge and practice among the researchers in the agricultural economics community in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. We conclude that beyond short-term measures like changing rules of reporting in publications, a cultural change regarding empirical scientific practices is needed that stretches across all our roles in the scientific process. Acceptance of scientific work should largely be based on the theoretical and methodological rigor and where the perceived relevance arises from the questions asked, the methodology employed, and the data used but not from the results generated. Revised and clear journal guidelines, the creation of resources for teaching and research, and public recognition of good practice are suggested measures to move forward.
    Keywords: Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–12–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ubfred:316369&r=
  83. By: Yong He (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UCA - Université Clermont Auvergne); Guang-Zhen Sun (UMac - University of Macau)
    Abstract: This paper aims at bridging the approaches on entrepreneurship and income mobility with a market selection process. An inter-temporal model is introduced to show that market incentives drive the households with higher entrepreneurial abilities to rationally make greater efforts. As such, market selection works: households with higher abilities earn higher incomes. This selection gives rise to income mobility over time in the favor of the households with higher abilities. Given household choices are also in function of market risk, the performance of market selection varies among countries, depending on the capability of the state to supply an ample market infrastructure and the endowment of social capital in order to reduce market risk. The tests based on a sample of 1530 Chinese rural households during 1989-2009 confirm the theory.
    Keywords: Income Mobility,Entrepreneurship,Risk Taking,Market Selection,Market Infrastructure,Social Capital,Chinese Rural Economy
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-03412133&r=

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