nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2021‒11‒15
eighty-one papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Climate Risk and Agricultural Technology Adaption: Evidence from Rice Farmers in the Ayeyarwady River Delta of Myanmar By Muraoka, Rie; Furuya, Jun; Hirano, Akira; Sakurai, Takeshi
  2. Green Production Technologies and Technical Efficiency of Rice Farmers in China: A Case Study of Straw-Derived Biochar By Wang, Anbang; He, Ke; Zhang, Junbiao; Zeng, Yangmei
  3. Farmers' Acceptance of Result-Based Agri-Environmental Schemes - Insights from a Case Study in North Rhine-Westphalia By Massfeller, Anna; Meraner, Manuela; Hüttel, Silke; Uehleke, Reinhard
  4. Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Food Security and Income in Developing Countries of Stakeholders: A Case Study of Rice Value Chain Actors By Aboudou, Rachidi; Arouna, Aminou; Yergo; Mujawamariya, Gaudiose
  5. The Aid–Nutrition Link: Can Targeted Development Assistance to the Agricultural Sector Reduce Hunger? By Kornher, Lukas; Kubik, Zaneta; Chichaibelu, Bezawit Beyene; Torero, Maximo
  6. Cover Crop Cost-Share Programs in Iowa: Do They Work? By Wendiam Sawadgo; Alejandro Plastina
  7. Preferences for Tree-Fruit Market Attributes Among Smallholder Farmers in Eastern Rwanda: A Discrete Choice Experiment By Seegers, Ronja; Ihli, Hanna; Winter, Etti; Chiputwa, Brian; Gassner, Anja
  8. Weather Shock, Agricultural Productivity and Infant Health: A Tale of Environmental Injustice By Pal, Soumya
  9. Will Iowa Farmland Values Continue to Rise? By Wendong Zhang
  10. A New Approach to Explain Food Choices Using Individual Environmental Attitude Measure: The Case of a Sustainable Tomato By Trentinaglia, Maria Teresa; Baldi, Lucia; Mancuso, Teresina; Peri, Massimo
  11. The Impact of Flooding on China's Agricultural Production and Food Security in 2020 By Xi He; Dermot J. Hayes; Wendong Zhang
  12. Does Food Security Influence the Nutritional Status in India? Empirical Evidences from State-Level Cross Sectional Study By Palanisamy, Venkatesh; Vellaichamy, Sangeetha; Sendhil, R; Jha, Girish Kumar
  13. Willingness to Pay for Postharvest Technologies and Its Influencing Factors Among Smallholder Mango Farmers in Kenya By Mujuka, Esther; Mburu, John; Ackello-Ogutu, Chris; Ambuko, Jane
  14. Projections going into Harvest By Lee L. Schulz; Chad Hart
  15. Impacts of Sweeping Agricultural Marketing Reforms in a Poor State of India: Evidence from Repeal of the Apmc Act in Bihar By Roy, Devesh; Saroj, Sunil; Kishore, Avinash; Kishore, Prabhat
  16. Factors Influencing Farmers’ Participation in Groups and the Impact of Collective Marketing on Household Food Security and Income in Sahel, Niger By Zakari, Seydou; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Moussa, Bokar; Ibro, Germaine
  17. Spatial Heterogeneity of Oil Palm Production in Farm Households: Insights from Jambi, Indonesia By Sibhatu, Kibrom T.; Steinhübel, Linda; Siregar, Hermanto; Qaim, Matin; Wollni, Meike
  18. Iowa's Role in US Agriculture By Lee L. Schulz; Chad Hart
  19. Agricultural Commercialization in Ethiopia: Household Determinants and Links to Rising Income By Minot, Nicholas; Warner, James; Aredo, Samson Dejene; Zewdie, Tadiwos
  20. Cover Crops and No-till in the I-States: Non-Permanence and Carbon Markets By Alejandro Plastina; Wendiam Sawadgo
  21. Examining the Role of Spatially-Dependent Time Preference in Improved Rice Technology Adoption Decisions By Ambali, Omotuyole I.; Areal, Francisco J.; Georgantzis, Nikolaos; Oyetunde-Usman, Zainab
  22. Index insurance for coping with drought-induced risk of production losses in French forests By Sandrine Brèteau-Amores; Marielle Brunette; Christophe François; Antoine Leblois; Nicolas Martin-Stpaul
  23. Gendered perceptions in maize supply chains: Evidence from Uganda By Bjorn Van Campenhout; Anusha De
  24. Rethinking the Link between Production Diversity and Dietary Diversity: Theory and Evidence By Keenan, Michael; Karanja, Stanley; Pamuk, Haki; Ruben, Ruerd
  25. Impacts of Changes Towards More Sustainable Food Production and Consumption at the Global Level By Boysen-Urban, Kirsten; Philippidis, George; M'barek, Robert; Ferrari, Emanuele
  26. Corn Yields and Climate Change: The Innovation Challenge By GianCarlo Moschini; Yongjie Ji; Seungki Lee
  27. Within Growing Season Weather Variability and Adaptation in Agriculture: Evidence from Cropping Patterns of Ethiopia By Hasen, Musa; Tesfaye, Wondimagegn; Dietrich, Stephan; Gassmann, Franziska
  28. Induced Bias of Technological Change in Agriculture and Structural Transformation: A Translog Cost Function Analysis of Chinese Cereal Production By Dong, Qi; Murakami, Tomoaki; Nakashima, Yasuhiro
  29. Cash Transfers and Children’s Educational Outcomes in Rural China: Evidence from the New Rural Pension Scheme By Zheng, Xiaodong; Shangguan, Shuangyue; Shen, Zheng; Fang, Xiangming
  30. Futures Market for Ag Carbon Offsets under Mandatory and Voluntary Emission Targets By Oranuch Wongpiyabovorn; Alejandro Plastina; Sergio H. Lence
  31. Comparative Analysis of Rice Yield Determinants in Irrigated Production System in West Africa: Evidence from Classification and Regression Trees Model in Mali and Senegal By Arouna, Aminou; Yergo, Wilfried Gnipabo; Aboudou, Rachidi; Saito, Kazuki
  32. Failing Synergies Among Public Programs:the Economy-Wide Effects of One Rural Credit and Two Social Protection Programs Simultaneously Implemented in Southern Brazil By Specht, Gabriel; Nuppenau, Ernst-August; Domptail, Stephanie
  33. Analysing Interventions in the Seed and Breeding System for Organic Carrot Seed Use in Germany - a Multi-Agent Value Chain Approach By Winter, Eva; Grovermann, Christian; Aurbacher, Joachim; Messmer, Monika M.
  34. Over-perception about Land Use Changes: Assessing Empirical Evidence and Linkage with Decisions and Motivated Beliefs By Hongli Feng; Tong Wang; David A. Hennessy; Gaurav Arora
  35. Resilience of agropastoral households affected by large scale land investments: The case of Ethiopia By Bekele, Adugna Eneyew; Dries, Liesbeth; Drabik, Dusan; Heijman, Wim
  36. Extreme Weather and Yield Variability: Mitigation Effect of Agricultural Mechanization in China By Wang, Teng; Yi, Fujin; Liu, Huilin; Wu, Ximing; Zhong, Funing
  37. Investment Decisions and Gender in Agricultural Households: Evidence from Lab-in-the-Field Experiment in Rural Tanzania By Pamuk, Haki; Keenan, Michael; Karanja, Stanley; Hella, Joseph
  38. Do Small Farm Sizes Imply Large Resource Misallocation? Evidence from Wheat-Maize Double Cropping Farms in the North China Plain By Chen, Minjie; Heerink, Nico; Zhu, Xueqin; Feng, Shuyi
  39. Government Transfers, COVID-19 Shock, and Food Insecurity: Evidence from Rural Households in India By Kumar, Anjani; Mishra, Ashok; Saroj, Sunil; Rashid, Shahidur
  40. Can Technology Demonstration Promote Rural Households’ Adoption of Conservation Tillage in the Main Grain-Producing Areas of China? By Liu, Qiaochu; Wang, Zhenhua; Yang, Jian; Jiang, Jinqi
  41. Is the US Agricultural Sector Recovering from COVID-19? By Lee L. Schulz; Chad Hart
  42. Mapping Welfare and Development Programmes with Sdgs in Indian Village By Rani, Ch Radhika; Das, Abhipsita; Reddy, A Amarender; Reddy, C. Papi; Sneha, Anjani Vajrala
  43. Strategic Delegation in the Formation of Modest International Environmental Agreements By Spycher, Sarah; Winkler, Ralph
  44. Evaluating the contribution of nature to well-being: The case of ecosystem services related to fish-farming ponds in France By Helene Rey-Valette; Thierry Blayac; Jean-Michel Salles
  45. Push-Pull Technology As a Climate-Smart Integrated Pest Management Strategy in Southern Ethiopia By Abro, Zewdu; Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Balew, Solomon; Kassie, Menale; Tefera, Tadele
  46. Avian influenza transmission risk along live poultry trading networks in Bangladesh By Moyen, Natalie; Hoque, Md Ahasanul; Mahmud, Rashed; Hasan, Mahmudul; Sarkar, Sudipta; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Mehedi, Hossain; Henning, Joerg; Mangtani, Punam; Flora, Meerjady Sabrina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Debnath, Nitish C.; Giasuddin, Mohammad; Barnett, Tony; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Fournié, Guillaume
  47. Healthfulness of Food Purchases and Food Access in France By Fadhuile, Adelaide; Caillavet, France; Kyureghian, Gayaneh; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
  48. Crude Oil Price Shocks and Food Production Output in Oil Producing and Exporting Countries: The Case Study of Nigeria By Obayelu, Abiodun; Ogunmola, Omotoso; Obayelu, Oluwakemi; Adeyemi, Oluwatosin
  49. Based on Volume or Sugar Content: Comparison of Consumer Welfare Effects of Different Consumption Tax Strategies for Sugar-Sweetened Beverages——Evidence from Urban China By Zhai, Tianchang; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Lei; Si, Wei
  50. Adapting to Climate Change: Threat Experience, Cognition and Protection Motivation By Adloff, Susann
  51. Intensification Under Input Constraints: Estimating the Heterogenous Effects of Hybrid Maize Adoption in Nepal By Paudel, Gokul; Krishna, Vijesh; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; McDonald, Andrew
  52. Potential Adoption of Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems in the Corn Belt Region By Philip W. Gassman; Adriana Valcu-Lisman
  53. New Evidence on Using Expert Ratings to Proxy for Wine Quality in Climate Change Research By Amogh Prakasha Kumar; Richard Watt; Laura Meriluoto
  54. Does Subjective Diet Knowledge Affect Sugar-Sweetened Carbonated Beverages Consumption and Child Obesity? Empirical Evidence from Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in China By Tao, Chang; Zhao, Qiran; Si, Wei; Li, Jun
  55. Effects of Short-Term Food Price Movements on Child Mortality: Evidence from Low- and Middle-Income Countries By Usman, Muhammed A.; Mekonnen, Daniel A.; Kornher, Lukas; Braun, Joachim Von
  56. Availability, Seasonality, and Affordability of Nutritious Diets for All – Evidence from Malawi By Masters, William A.; Schneider, Kate; Christiaensen, Luc; Webb, Patrick
  57. Productivity Effects of Biological Control of Maize Stemborer Pests in Kenya: Damage Control Function Approach By Midingoyi, Soul-Kifouly; Affognon, Hippolyte; Macharia, Ibrahim; Leru, Bruno
  58. Farmers’ Perceptions of Commercial Insect-Based Feed for Sustainable Livestock Production By Okello, Afrika; Nzuma, Jonathan; Otieno, David Jakinda; Kidoido, Michael; Tanga, Chrysantus
  59. Land governance and the conflict in South Sudan By Deng, David K.
  60. Land-use hysteresis triggered by staggered payment schemes for more permanent biodiversity conservation By Drechsler, Martin; Grimm, Volker
  61. GLOBAL CONSUMPTION PATTERNS, QUALITY AND FOOD DEMAND By Kenneth W. Clements; Long Hai Vo
  62. Is China's Hog Rebuilding Complete? Reconciling Inventory and Price Data By Xi He; Dermot J. Hayes; Wendong Zhang
  63. The SNAP Disbursement Schedule and its Effects By Katherine Harris-Lagoudakis; Hannah Wich
  64. Rural Household Vulnerability to Weather Changes By Cassava Farmer's in Ondo State, Nigeria By Awolala, Ayodele; Amos, Taiwo; Akinrinola, Olumide; Awolala, David
  65. Predicting China's Corn Acreage and Production in 2021/22 and 2022/23 By Xi He; Miguel Carriquiry; Wendong Zhang; Dermot J. Hayes
  66. Investigating Technical Efficiency of Spanish Pig Farming: A Quantile Regression Approach By Guesmi, Bouali; Monje, Juan Cabas; Sidhoum, Amer Ait; Gil, Jose M.
  67. Research on the Effect of FDI on the Domestic Value-Added of Food Processing and Manufacturing Enterprises' Exports and Its Mechanism By Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhang, Yvette; Lin, Benxi; Jin, Shaosheng
  68. Unveiling the Profitability and Livelihood Status of SMALL-Scale Irish Potato Farmers in Jos South L.G.a. Plateau State, Nigeria. By Hudu, Muhammad Ibrahim; Acheneje, Daniel Idakwo; Adeiza, Yusuf Abdulazeez; Ugbede, Adejoh Emmanuel
  69. More than money? Job quality and food insecurity among employed lone mother households in the United States By Sheely, Amanda
  70. Upheaval in China's Corn Market: Will China expand its Tariff Rate Quota for Corn? By Xi He; Dermot J. Hayes; Wendong Zhang
  71. The Impact of COVID-19 on Dietary Diversity and Health of Children and Adolescents: Evidence from a Rural-Urban Panel Study By Cui, Yi; Si, Wei; Zhao, Qiran; Feng, Xiaolong
  72. Impact of Pro-Gender Public Policies in the Agricultural Sectors on Women Employment in a Natural Resources Dependence Context : A CGE Analysis for the DRC. By Baroki, Robert; Joshi, Christian; Bulumba, Mariam
  73. Anatomy of Green Specialization: Evidence from EU Production Data, 1995-2015 By Filippo Bontadini; Francesco Vona
  74. Sugarcane Based Ethanol Production for Fuel Ethanol Blending Program in India By Murali, Palanichamy; Ram, Bakshi; Prathap, Duraisamy Puthira; Hari, K; Venkatasubramanian, V
  75. The United States' Competitive Positions in Beef, Corn, Pork, Soy, and Wheat Exports: 1980-2019 By Chen-Ti Chen; John M. Crespi; Yongjie Ji
  76. The Economics of Trypanosomiasis: Empirical Evidence on Its Impacts on Livestock Production and Welfare By Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Melesse, Tigist Mekonnen; Abro, Zewdu; Kassie, Menale
  77. Reflective Willingness to Pay: Preferences for Sustainable Consumption in a Consumer Welfare Analysis By Inderst, Roman; Thomas, Stefan
  78. Federal Food Policy Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic By Katherine Harris-Lagoudakis
  79. Determinants of Consumers’ Perception of Eggs Derived from Layer Chickens Fed Commercial Insect-Based Feeds By Khaemba, Colleta; Kidoido, Michael; Owuor, George; Tanga, Chrysantus
  80. How Communications that Portray Unhealthy Food Consumption Reduce Food Intake Among Dieters By Mia M. Birau; Diogo Hildebrand; Carolina O. C. Werle
  81. The US-EU Trade War: What Effects for the Olive Oil World Market? By Demaria, Federica; Antimiani, Alessandro; D’Andrea, Maria Rosaria Pupo; Solazzo, Roberto

  1. By: Muraoka, Rie; Furuya, Jun; Hirano, Akira; Sakurai, Takeshi
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314985&r=
  2. By: Wang, Anbang; He, Ke; Zhang, Junbiao; Zeng, Yangmei
    Keywords: Farm Management, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315026&r=
  3. By: Massfeller, Anna; Meraner, Manuela; Hüttel, Silke; Uehleke, Reinhard
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315148&r=
  4. By: Aboudou, Rachidi; Arouna, Aminou; Yergo; Mujawamariya, Gaudiose
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315297&r=
  5. By: Kornher, Lukas; Kubik, Zaneta; Chichaibelu, Bezawit Beyene; Torero, Maximo
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315179&r=
  6. By: Wendiam Sawadgo; Alejandro Plastina (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: Farmers often use cover crops for their soil health benefits. However, the benefits of cover crops go beyond the farm, as they have been shown to reduce nutrient pollution from fields to waterways through leaching or runoff. As such, cover crops have been extensively promoted as a way to improve Iowa's water quality. However, as of 2017, cover crops were used on only 4% of Iowa cropland.
    Date: 2021–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-spring-2021-1&r=
  7. By: Seegers, Ronja; Ihli, Hanna; Winter, Etti; Chiputwa, Brian; Gassner, Anja
    Keywords: Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314980&r=
  8. By: Pal, Soumya
    Abstract: We study how income shock affect due to weather shock causally impacts the birth outcomes. We selected households depended directly on agriculture due to their extreme vulnerability to temperature and rainfall shocks. We find large efficiency loss attributed to weather shock for major food crops to the extent of 20%. However, we find that access to technology provides resilience against weather shock, therefore, causing the heterogeneity in vulnerability across farming households. Based on it, we designed the agriculture-household model, which predicts that health outcomes of child is dependent on income shock due to change in weather conditions. We tested the hypothesis by introducing weather shock in the cropping season before the conception of child to elim- inate the confounding effect of direct impact due to extreme weather conditions. We find that weather shocks in cropping season, increases the likelihood of child mortality, low birth weight, and birth size. We further find that access to technology, financial tools, and economic security net reduces the impact of income loss due to weather shock. Our results suggests that access to resilient capabilities leads to heterogeneous impact across farmer households causing environmental injustice. Further, our findings provide insights into the policy design for long term shift in weather patterns due to climate change and stresses on the inequality in resilience against extreme weather events.
    Keywords: Environmental Justice,Weather Shock,Farm Income,Child Mortality
    JEL: Q1 Q5 I1 I3 D1
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:glodps:965&r=
  9. By: Wendong Zhang (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: The farmland market and the agricultural economy have seen a remarkable ride over the past year-the world shut down in early 2020 with unprecedented uncertainty and anxiety; however, the agricultural commodity markets and the land market have gained noticeable strength since fall 2020. Record government support, historically low interest rates, and surging agricultural exports led to a near-10% hike in farmland values for almost all Midwestern states.
    Date: 2021–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-spring-2021-5&r=
  10. By: Trentinaglia, Maria Teresa; Baldi, Lucia; Mancuso, Teresina; Peri, Massimo
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315181&r=
  11. By: Xi He (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Dermot J. Hayes (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Wendong Zhang (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: In June and July of 2020, severe flooding decimated crops in several of China's southern provinces. By August, China's State Council Information Office estimated that heavy rainfalls had affected 27 provinces, 63,000,000 people, and led to a direct loss of $26 billion. He, Hayes, and Zhang examine the impact of the flooding and find that it affected 23% of the planted area of summer crops, caused 4.3% crop failure, and increased meat and vegetable prices, but not grain prices. They also find that China increased its grain imports this year, which could partially counteract its grain production loss from the flooding and help dampen the impact on national food security.
    Date: 2020–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2020-4&r=
  12. By: Palanisamy, Venkatesh; Vellaichamy, Sangeetha; Sendhil, R; Jha, Girish Kumar
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315230&r=
  13. By: Mujuka, Esther; Mburu, John; Ackello-Ogutu, Chris; Ambuko, Jane
    Keywords: Farm Management, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315331&r=
  14. By: Lee L. Schulz (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Chad Hart (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: The changing of seasons from summer to autumn usually shifts the focus of agricultural market traders. For crops, the focus shifts from supplies to usage. For livestock, the focus shifts from the current year to the upcoming year. USDA's monthly projections of the global agricultural supply and demand situation help frame those shifts and outline the anticipated movements within the markets. The September report provided a mix of signals across the crop and livestock markets. In general, the expansion of meat production is slowing down. While meat demand remains strong, animal numbers, especially in beef, have pulled back due to a variety of reasons. Livestock prices are projected to fall in 2022, given the slightly higher production, with the exception of beef. Crop production is also projected higher this fall, despite the drought. Crop usage, which was strong throughout most of the 2020 marketing year, fell off during the summer. The crop usage outlook for the 2021 crops was increased slightly, but still is below the previous year's levels.
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2021-5&r=
  15. By: Roy, Devesh; Saroj, Sunil; Kishore, Avinash; Kishore, Prabhat
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315092&r=
  16. By: Zakari, Seydou; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Moussa, Bokar; Ibro, Germaine
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315020&r=
  17. By: Sibhatu, Kibrom T.; Steinhübel, Linda; Siregar, Hermanto; Qaim, Matin; Wollni, Meike
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315222&r=
  18. By: Lee L. Schulz (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Chad Hart (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: While 2020 was a challenging year in many aspects, several features of Iowa agriculture remained consistent. Iowa continues to lead the nation in numerous agricultural production categories-corn and soybean production was robust despite the combined impacts of the drought and the derecho and meat production continued to build despite issues in processing capacity. The strength in Iowa's agricultural production base is expected to extend through 2021.
    Date: 2021–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-spring-2021-3&r=
  19. By: Minot, Nicholas; Warner, James; Aredo, Samson Dejene; Zewdie, Tadiwos
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315314&r=
  20. By: Alejandro Plastina (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Wendiam Sawadgo
    Abstract: Emerging voluntary carbon markets are attracting lots of attention in US agriculture, to the extent that agriculture carbon credits are usually referred to as the new cash crop. In essence, large companies would purchase carbon credits from multiple sources, including agriculture, to achieve their net zero emission goals. Farmers and ranchers would implement conservation practices that sequester carbon or provide other environmental benefits in exchange for compensation in cash or carbon credits depending on the carbon program. However, not all conservation practices are able to generate carbon credits.
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2021-7&r=
  21. By: Ambali, Omotuyole I.; Areal, Francisco J.; Georgantzis, Nikolaos; Oyetunde-Usman, Zainab
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315286&r=
  22. By: Sandrine Brèteau-Amores (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Marielle Brunette (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Christophe François (ESE - Ecologie Systématique et Evolution - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AgroParisTech - UP11 - Université Paris-Sud - Paris 11); Antoine Leblois (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Nicolas Martin-Stpaul (URFM - Ecologie des Forêts Méditerranéennes - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Drought-induced risk of forest dieback is increasing due to climate change. Insurance can be a good option to compensate potential financial losses associated with forest production losses. In this context, we developed an ex ante index-based insurance model to cope with drought-induced risk of forest dieback. We applied this model to beech and oak forests in France. We defined and then compared different indices from simple ones relying on rainfall indices to more complex ones relying on the functional modelling of forest sensitivity to water stress. After the calibration of the contract parameters, an insurance scheme was optimized and tested. We showed that optimal insurance contracts generate low gain of certain equivalent income, high compensation, and a high basis risk. The best contract was not proportional to the complexity of the index. There was no clear advantage to differentiate contracts based on species. Results highlighting the various perspectives of this first approach are discussed at the end of this chapter.
    Keywords: Forest,Index insurance,Drought
    Date: 2021–10–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-03401881&r=
  23. By: Bjorn Van Campenhout; Anusha De
    Abstract: In situations with imperfect information, the way that value chain actors perceive each other is an important determinant of the value chain's structure and performance. Inaccurate perceptions may result in inefficient value chains, and systematic bias in perceptions may affect inclusiveness. In a case study on perceptions in Ugandan maize supply chains, a random sample of farmers were asked to rate upstream and downstream value chain actors-agro-input dealers, traders, and processors-on a set of important attributes that included ease of access, quality of services rendered, price competitiveness, and overall reputation. These value chain actors were then tracked and asked to assess themselves on the same set of attributes. We find that input dealers, traders, and processors assess themselves more favourably than farmers do. We also focus on heterogeneity in perceptions related to gender and find that for self- assessments, the gender of the value chain actor does not matter. However, the difference between how actors assess themselves and how farmers perceive them is larger for male than for female farmers, as female farmers appear to rate dealers, traders, and processors significantly higher in several dimensions. The gender of the actor being rated does not affect the rating they receive, and gender-based homophily among women is not present in rating behaviour.
    Date: 2021–11–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ete:licosp:683140&r=
  24. By: Keenan, Michael; Karanja, Stanley; Pamuk, Haki; Ruben, Ruerd
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315349&r=
  25. By: Boysen-Urban, Kirsten; Philippidis, George; M'barek, Robert; Ferrari, Emanuele
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315275&r=
  26. By: GianCarlo Moschini (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Yongjie Ji (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Seungki Lee
    Abstract: Production agriculture depends heavily on exogenous environmental conditions, including weather. As such, agriculture is acutely vulnerable to the deleterious long-run effects of climate change. Indeed, mounting evidence suggests the likelihood of large negative impacts. What can be done about it? Actions to deal with climate change can be thought of as pursuing "mitigation" and/or "adaptation"-mitigation is about containing climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, whereas adaptation blunts and counteracts the damaging consequences of climate change. Countries' free-riding incentives make global cooperation to reduce emissions difficult, and thus mitigation problematic. Adaptation, by contrast, is less vulnerable to opportunistic behavior because investments in adaptation often have local payoffs and substantial private good aspects.
    Date: 2021–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-winter-2021-1&r=
  27. By: Hasen, Musa; Tesfaye, Wondimagegn; Dietrich, Stephan; Gassmann, Franziska
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315056&r=
  28. By: Dong, Qi; Murakami, Tomoaki; Nakashima, Yasuhiro
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315373&r=
  29. By: Zheng, Xiaodong; Shangguan, Shuangyue; Shen, Zheng; Fang, Xiangming
    Keywords: Political Economy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315411&r=
  30. By: Oranuch Wongpiyabovorn; Alejandro Plastina (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Sergio H. Lence (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: Increasing concerns about climate change have prompted actions, both by governments and the private sector, aimed at curbing the emissions of greenhouse gases. An important number of such initiatives involve the trading of GHG allowances and offsets. An allowance permits its holder to emit a specified amount of GHGs, whereas an offset is a certified reduction in GHG emissions that can be used to compensate for GHG emissions elsewhere. Recently, carbon offsets have attracted the attention of decisionmakers in agriculture for their alleged potential to enhance farmers' profits, as some agricultural activities can generate offsets by capturing GHGs (e.g., methane capture from manure management, soil carbon sequestration, and fertilizer use reduction). The purpose of this article is to provide some background information on these markets and discuss the potential of the futures market for GHG offsets recently launched by the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Group to act as a catalyzer of the market for agricultural offsets.
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2021-4&r=
  31. By: Arouna, Aminou; Yergo, Wilfried Gnipabo; Aboudou, Rachidi; Saito, Kazuki
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315260&r=
  32. By: Specht, Gabriel; Nuppenau, Ernst-August; Domptail, Stephanie
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315012&r=
  33. By: Winter, Eva; Grovermann, Christian; Aurbacher, Joachim; Messmer, Monika M.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314959&r=
  34. By: Hongli Feng (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Tong Wang; David A. Hennessy (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Gaurav Arora
    Abstract: Perception biases documented in the literature often pertain to subject matters that are difficult to observe or measure such as one's ability. We study perception biases with respect to a concrete indicator that can be objectively measured: land use changes in a local area. We examine four hypotheses about land use change perceptions and test them with farm survey data complemented by satellite data. We discover systematic biases in farmers' perceptions about local land use changes that are consistent with motivated beliefs, and also evidence that links perceptions with intended future land conversions. Alternative explanations and policy implications are discussed.
    Date: 2021–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:21-wp626&r=
  35. By: Bekele, Adugna Eneyew; Dries, Liesbeth; Drabik, Dusan; Heijman, Wim
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315087&r=
  36. By: Wang, Teng; Yi, Fujin; Liu, Huilin; Wu, Ximing; Zhong, Funing
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315098&r=
  37. By: Pamuk, Haki; Keenan, Michael; Karanja, Stanley; Hella, Joseph
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315291&r=
  38. By: Chen, Minjie; Heerink, Nico; Zhu, Xueqin; Feng, Shuyi
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315141&r=
  39. By: Kumar, Anjani; Mishra, Ashok; Saroj, Sunil; Rashid, Shahidur
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315069&r=
  40. By: Liu, Qiaochu; Wang, Zhenhua; Yang, Jian; Jiang, Jinqi
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315171&r=
  41. By: Lee L. Schulz (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Chad Hart (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has lowered the prices of US agricultural products, forced significant shifts in supply chains, and disrupted markets. Earlier this year, the livestock sector was hit significantly hard as processing facilities dealt with large COVID-19 outbreaks that reduced the availability of labor and created backups in the supply chain. To explore the extent of recovery in the US agricultural sector, Schulz and Hart examine USDA's most recent meat, corn, and soybean projections. The data show mixed results for US agricultural products-the prices and projections for some products are down, while others are up from the last outlook.
    Date: 2020–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2020-3&r=
  42. By: Rani, Ch Radhika; Das, Abhipsita; Reddy, A Amarender; Reddy, C. Papi; Sneha, Anjani Vajrala
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315279&r=
  43. By: Spycher, Sarah; Winkler, Ralph
    JEL: Q58
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242366&r=
  44. By: Helene Rey-Valette (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Thierry Blayac (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Jean-Michel Salles (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Ecosystem Services (ES) can contribute to several aspects of human well-being (WB) that we understand as the subjective perception that individuals have of their quality of life, depending on a set of factors. We compare the relative weights of the WB factors resulting from ES (ES-based) and those that do not depend on ES (non-ES-based), from an online survey (N = 1006) relating to ES linked to fish-farming ponds in France. A summary variable, the "WB profile", allows to identify individuals (38% of respondents) whose WB is strongly linked to the presence of ES (the number of ES-based WB factors is greater than the number of non-ES-based WB factors). The WB profile of these individuals is analyzed with a binary logit model showing the preponderance of variable accounting for perceptions and interactions with ecosystems (attendance, relationship and attachment to nature, efforts to preserve the environment). We observe a lower level of training and the existence of a threshold effect on the relationship between life satisfaction and the ES-dependent profile: this contribution only concerns people with a high life satisfaction index. These results attest to the importance of pro-environmental perceptions, emotions and behaviors for conservation policies.
    Keywords: Ecosystem services,Fish-farming ponds,Nature perceptions,Well-being
    Date: 2022–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03355613&r=
  45. By: Abro, Zewdu; Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Balew, Solomon; Kassie, Menale; Tefera, Tadele
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315246&r=
  46. By: Moyen, Natalie; Hoque, Md Ahasanul; Mahmud, Rashed; Hasan, Mahmudul; Sarkar, Sudipta; Biswas, Paritosh Kumar; Mehedi, Hossain; Henning, Joerg; Mangtani, Punam; Flora, Meerjady Sabrina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Debnath, Nitish C.; Giasuddin, Mohammad; Barnett, Tony; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Fournié, Guillaume
    Abstract: Live animal markets are known hotspots of zoonotic disease emergence. To mitigate those risks, we need to understand how networks shaped by trading practices influence disease spread. Yet, those practices are rarely recorded in high-risk settings. Through a large cross-sectional study, we assessed the potential impact of live poultry trading networks’ structures on avian influenza transmission dynamics in Bangladesh. Networks promoted mixing between chickens sourced from different farming systems and geographical locations, fostering co-circulation of viral strains of diverse origins in markets. Viral transmission models suggested that the observed rise in viral prevalence from farms to markets was unlikely explained by intra-market transmission alone, but substantially influenced by transmission occurring in upstream network nodes. Disease control interventions should therefore alter the entire network structures. However, as networks differed between chicken types and city supplied, standardised interventions are unlikely to be effective, and should be tailored to local structural characteristics.
    JEL: R14 J01
    Date: 2021–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:112514&r=
  47. By: Fadhuile, Adelaide; Caillavet, France; Kyureghian, Gayaneh; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315402&r=
  48. By: Obayelu, Abiodun; Ogunmola, Omotoso; Obayelu, Oluwakemi; Adeyemi, Oluwatosin
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315394&r=
  49. By: Zhai, Tianchang; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Lei; Si, Wei
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315103&r=
  50. By: Adloff, Susann
    JEL: Q54 D91
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242400&r=
  51. By: Paudel, Gokul; Krishna, Vijesh; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; McDonald, Andrew
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315146&r=
  52. By: Philip W. Gassman (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Adriana Valcu-Lisman
    Abstract: Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is a technique for improving groundwater recharge and maintaining aquifer levels to support water storage for water treatment systems and irrigation for agricultural production or other water needs. MAR is an effective buffer against future fluctuations in water demand, drought, and climate change. MAR systems include bank filtration, infiltration ponds/galleries, percolation tanks, and aquifer storage and recovery wells. In the United States, MAR system use has increased for several reasons including water shortages, greater need for reliable seasonal water sources, and favorable costs. Dillon et al. report that average annual total MAR volume in the United States was 2,569 million cubic meters/year in 2015. However, wider adoption of MAR systems has been hindered by uncertainty in determining appropriate site conditions and MAR method, lack of economic data, and legal, policy, and/or environmental issues.
    Date: 2021–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-spring-2021-6&r=
  53. By: Amogh Prakasha Kumar; Richard Watt (University of Canterbury); Laura Meriluoto (University of Canterbury)
    Abstract: This paper provides new evidence on the validity of using product-level expert winescoring data as a proxy for wine quality in climate change research, using nearly 15,000 Bob Campbell ratings of New Zealand wines from 2002 to 2016. We examine two to three regression models for each of the seven most prominent varieties in New Zealand, each with 8-12 treatments. We look for a positive, concave relationship between the expert score and the growing season temperature that gives an optimal temperature value that is plausible given research from other countries. We find mixed results – only 56% of our results are consistent with expectation and give a plausible optimal temperature and 27% are also significant. However, when we “collapse” the data by region, variety and year, essentially constructing vintage scores from our product-level data, we find that all results are consistent with expectation and plausible and 53% are statistically significant despite the sample size after collapsing becoming very small. We conclude that there is great potential in using vintage data constructed from expert-rating data for individual wines for climate change research.
    Keywords: Weather, climate change, wine score, wine quality
    JEL: C32 Q54
    Date: 2021–11–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cbt:econwp:21/10&r=
  54. By: Tao, Chang; Zhao, Qiran; Si, Wei; Li, Jun
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315195&r=
  55. By: Usman, Muhammed A.; Mekonnen, Daniel A.; Kornher, Lukas; Braun, Joachim Von
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis, Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315112&r=
  56. By: Masters, William A.; Schneider, Kate; Christiaensen, Luc; Webb, Patrick
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315036&r=
  57. By: Midingoyi, Soul-Kifouly; Affognon, Hippolyte; Macharia, Ibrahim; Leru, Bruno
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315385&r=
  58. By: Okello, Afrika; Nzuma, Jonathan; Otieno, David Jakinda; Kidoido, Michael; Tanga, Chrysantus
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315215&r=
  59. By: Deng, David K.
    Abstract: This paper examines how land governance – or the rules, processes, and structures through which decisions are made about access to land and its use, the manner in which the decisions are implemented and enforced, and the way that competing interests in land are managed – has interacted with the conflict in South Sudan.1 A theme running through the paper is that control over decisions relating to land, as much as control over the land itself, has served as a means for individuals and groups to advance their interests in the conflict setting.
    JEL: R14 J01
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:112509&r=
  60. By: Drechsler, Martin; Grimm, Volker
    Abstract: Making conservation payment schemes permanent so that conservation efforts are retained even after the payment has been stopped, is a major challenge. Another challenge is to design conservation so that they counteract the ongoing spatial fragmentation of species habitat. The agglomeration bonus in which a bonus is added to a flat payment if the conservation activity is carried out in the neighbourhood of other conserved land, has been shown to induce the establishment of spatially contiguous habitat. I the present paper we show, with a generic spatially explicit agent-based simulation model, that the interactions between the landowners in an agglomeration bonus scheme can lead to hysteresis in the land-use dynamics, implying permanence of the scheme. It is shown that this permanence translates into efficiency gains, especially if discount rates are low and the spatial heterogeneity of conservation costs is high.
    Keywords: agent-based model, agglomeration bonus, conservation payment, land use, permanence
    JEL: C63 Q24 Q57 Q58
    Date: 2022–10–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:110361&r=
  61. By: Kenneth W. Clements (Economics Department, Business School, The University of Western Australia); Long Hai Vo (Economics Department, Business School, The University of Western Australia)
    Abstract: There are significant disparities in the wealth of nations and how incomes are spent. For example, consumers in the poorest countries spend more than half of income on food, while in the richest countries, this is one-tenth or less. We use the recently published data from the International Comparison Program for 176 countries to estimate cross-country demands. Considerable progress can be made in accounting for much of the disparities in consumption patterns with this simple utility-maximisation model in which variations in incomes and prices are the key drivers. This leads to measures of the “quality” of consumption and its price based on a luxury-necessity-revealed-preference approach, as well as projections of future world food demand.
    Keywords: Global consumption; Quality indexes; Engel’s law; Food demand projections
    JEL: D12 F61 Q11
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:uwa:wpaper:21-17&r=
  62. By: Xi He (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Dermot J. Hayes (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Wendong Zhang (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: The African swine fever outbreak that started in August 2018 wiped out 40% of China's sow inventory. China has been making substantial efforts, including subsidizing large hog producers and encouraging industrialization and modernization of hog production, to rebuild and expand its pork production. While China's governmental inventory data as of December 2020 show sow and hog inventory were 92.1% and 93.1% of their respective 2017 levels, recent record-high piglet, sow, hog, and pork prices suggest a large persistent supply shortage. China's record pork and live swine imports in 2020 suggest that China's hog rebuilding might be fast but of low genetic quality. Specifically, it seems likely that the retention of low-quality commercial generation gilts helped rebuild the herd but set back the national breeding system by abandoning purebred grandparents and parent generation propagation.
    Date: 2021–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-winter-2021-2&r=
  63. By: Katherine Harris-Lagoudakis (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Hannah Wich
    Abstract: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as the Food Stamp Program, is the largest food assistance program administered by the US Department of Agriculture. In 2017, SNAP provided aid to 12.9% of the United States population-the average household received $254 in benefits per month. The stated objectives of the SNAP program are to reduce hunger, malnutrition, and poverty through the provision of in-kind transfers to households who are eligible for benefits. Nevertheless, in a sample of SNAP households, approximately 61% indicated being food insecure in 2011 and 2012. Although SNAP is a federal program, each state is responsible for distributing benefits to its residents. Distribution dates for each household are determined at the state level and all 50 states currently deliver benefits according to a monthly distribution cycle.
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2021-3&r=
  64. By: Awolala, Ayodele; Amos, Taiwo; Akinrinola, Olumide; Awolala, David
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315009&r=
  65. By: Xi He (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Miguel Carriquiry; Wendong Zhang (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Dermot J. Hayes (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: China's corn imports exceeded its corn tariff rate quota of 7.2 million metric tons in 2020 and reached a record of 26 MMTs in the 2020/21 marketing year. While China's recent corn import surge was largely due to its feed demand to recover its hog inventory from the African Swine Fever outbreak, the prospect for China's corn imports is unclear. Figure 1 shows that China's corn futures price with maturity in November 2021 declined from around $10.80 per bushel in May to $9.70 per bushel in September 2021. The current level is still high relative to the historical norm. Over this period, China's hog futures price declined from the highest point of around $2 per pound to around $1 per pound. The hog futures price drop suggests that China's hog inventory recovery is likely making good progress, which will put upward pressure on China's corn imports in 2021/22 and 2022/23. The net impact will depend on China's domestic corn production, and to estimate this we need reasonable estimates of Chinese farmers' acreage and yield price supply elasticities.
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2021-6&r=
  66. By: Guesmi, Bouali; Monje, Juan Cabas; Sidhoum, Amer Ait; Gil, Jose M.
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315196&r=
  67. By: Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhang, Yvette; Lin, Benxi; Jin, Shaosheng
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315404&r=
  68. By: Hudu, Muhammad Ibrahim; Acheneje, Daniel Idakwo; Adeiza, Yusuf Abdulazeez; Ugbede, Adejoh Emmanuel
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315168&r=
  69. By: Sheely, Amanda
    Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between food insecurity and the uncertainty and inadequate financial resources associated with low quality work among lone mother households in the United States. Food insecurity has increased since the start of the Great Recession and is particularly high among lone mother households. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, I find that mothers who have are employed part-time involuntarily and experienced job loss have an increased likelihood of experiencing food insecurity. This relationship holds even after controlling for multiple measures of household income, suggesting the relationship between low quality work and food insecurity is not solely determined by low financial resources. Results suggest that, to reduce food insecurity among lone mother families, policymakers must address both the low wages and uncertainty associated with low quality employment.
    Keywords: food insecurity; precarious employment; lone mothers; working poor
    JEL: R14 J01 N0
    Date: 2021–10–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:112504&r=
  70. By: Xi He (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Dermot J. Hayes (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Wendong Zhang (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: China's has recently expanded its US agricultural product imports, partially due to the terms of the phase one trade deal and partially due to recent flooding in some of its largest agricultural-producing provinces (also examined in this issue of APR). He, Hayes, and Zhang examine recent price changes and changes in demand for corn in China and find that China will easily exceed its corn TRQ of 7.2 million metric tons in 2020.
    Date: 2020–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2020-2&r=
  71. By: Cui, Yi; Si, Wei; Zhao, Qiran; Feng, Xiaolong
    Keywords: Health Economics and Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315302&r=
  72. By: Baroki, Robert; Joshi, Christian; Bulumba, Mariam
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315114&r=
  73. By: Filippo Bontadini; Francesco Vona (OFCE - Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques - Sciences Po - Sciences Po)
    Abstract: We study green specialization across EU countries and detailed 4-digit industrial sectors over the period of 1995-2015 by harmonizing product-level data (PRODCOM). We propose a new list of green goods that refines lists proposed by international organizations by excluding goods with double usages. Our exploratory analysis reveals important structural properties of green specialization. First, green production is highly concentrated, with 13 out of 119 4-digit industries accounting for 95% of the total. Second, green and polluting productions do not occur in the same sectors, and countries tend to specialize in either green or brown sectors. This suggests that the distributional effect of European environmental policies can be large. Third, green specialization is highlypath dependent, but it is also reinforced by the presence of non-green capabilities within the same sector. This helps explain why economies with better engineering and technical capabilities have built a comparative advantage in green production.
    Keywords: Green goods,Green specialization,Revealed comparative advantage,Complementarity,Path dependency
    Date: 2020–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-03403070&r=
  74. By: Murali, Palanichamy; Ram, Bakshi; Prathap, Duraisamy Puthira; Hari, K; Venkatasubramanian, V
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314945&r=
  75. By: Chen-Ti Chen; John M. Crespi (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University); Yongjie Ji (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: In a recent publication, CARD researchers and USDA economists looked at the international relationships between the United States and its major export competitors in beef. In that article, the researchers examined beef because the 2004 bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") event caused a major disruption in US beef exports and the United States' competitive position. The authors conclude that even when exports return to pre-disruption levels, the disruption could change the structure of the export market. What the researchers found was that it took much longer for the United States' competitive position in beef to return to pre-disruption levels.
    Date: 2021–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-winter-2021-3&r=
  76. By: Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Melesse, Tigist Mekonnen; Abro, Zewdu; Kassie, Menale
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315259&r=
  77. By: Inderst, Roman; Thomas, Stefan
    Abstract: Our starting point is the following simple but potentially underappreciated observation: When assessing willingness to pay (WTP) for hedonic features of a product, the results of such measurement are influenced by the context in which the consumer makes her real or hypothetical choice or in which the questions to which she replies are set (such as in a contingent valuation analysis). This observation is of particular relevance when WTP regards sustainability, the "non-use value" of which does not derive from a direct (physical) sensation and where perceived benefits depend heavily on available information and deliberations. The recognition of such context sensitivity paves the way for a broader conception of consumer welfare (CW), and our proposed standard of "reflective WTP" may materially change the scope for private market initiatives with regards to sustainability, while keeping the analytical framework within the realm of the CW paradigm. In terms of practical implications, we argue, for instance, that actual purchasing decisions may prove insufficient to measure consumer appreciation of sustainability, as they may rather echo learnt but unreflected heuristics and may be subject to the specific shopping context, such as heavy price promotions. Also, while it may reflect current social norm, the latter may change considerably over time as more consumers adopt their behavior.
    Keywords: Antitrust,Consumer Welfare,Sustainability
    JEL: A13 K21 K32
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:lawfin:14&r=
  78. By: Katherine Harris-Lagoudakis (Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University)
    Abstract: In the 2019 fiscal year, one in four US residents participated in one of USDA's 15 food assistance programs. The COVID-19 pandemic, which has led to unprecedented spikes in unemployment as well as widespread school closures, has exacerbated already limited access to resources and sources of food for food insecure households. Harris-Lagoudakis examines how the federal governmental has addressed the effects of the pandemic by altering food policy and making changes to the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, SNAP, and other USDA food assistance programs. She finds that the economic downturn and the emergency federal policy provisions have increased the number of SNAP participating households and the amount of benefits allotted to SNAP beneficiaries. However, the NSLP and SBP have faced significant challenges in providing free and reduced price meals to children at risk for food insecurity.
    Date: 2020–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:apr-fall-2020-1&r=
  79. By: Khaemba, Colleta; Kidoido, Michael; Owuor, George; Tanga, Chrysantus
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315300&r=
  80. By: Mia M. Birau (emlyon business school); Diogo Hildebrand (Baruch College [CUNY] - CUNY - City University of New York [New York]); Carolina O. C. Werle (GEM - Grenoble Ecole de Management)
    Abstract: Both regulatory agencies and nonprofit organizations seek to understand how different tactics and appeals contained in food and public health advertisements might influence the food intake of an increasingly dieting-concerned population. This article addresses this important issue by examining how consumers who are concerned with their diets react to rich images of unhealthy food consumption. Results of two experiments show that exposure to food advertisements containing unhealthy food consumption imagery reduces food intake among consumers chronically concerned with dieting, whereas a third experiment shows a similar decrease in intended consumption when a public health advertisement portrays the consumption of unhealthy food. These findings in turn offer guidelines for maximizing the effectiveness of messages that attempt to promote healthy eating habits. Additionally, this research provides theoretical contributions to the self-control and mental imagery research domains which have public policy implications for regulatory agencies and nonprofit organizations.
    Keywords: counteractive control theory,health goal,consumption imagery,dieting concern
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03229512&r=
  81. By: Demaria, Federica; Antimiani, Alessandro; D’Andrea, Maria Rosaria Pupo; Solazzo, Roberto
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315400&r=

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