nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2021‒11‒01
fifty-six papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Impacts of Climate Change on Perennial Crops: An Empirical Study of Latin American Coffee Production By Xiao, Wuzheqian
  2. Impact of agricultural market linkages on small-scale farmers’ welfare: Evidence from Tanzania By Bueno Rezende De Castro, André
  3. Assessing Food Demand of Uganda in 2030 and 2050: Implications for Food Security and Attaining the Zero Hunger Goal By Mottaleb, Khondoker A.
  4. The Valuation of Soil Health Improvements and Ecosystem Services among Crop Producers in the U.S. By Park, Dojin
  5. Impact of Data Openness on Agricultural and Food Trade By Ahn, Soojung; Steinbach, Sandro
  6. Weather Shocks and Agricultural Credit in Developing Countries: Evidence from a Second-Floor Institution By Bohorquez-Penuela, Camilo
  7. Productivist Agricultural Systems to Multifunctional Agriculture in the Cocoa Agrarian System in Bahia, Brazil By Gustavo Bittencourt Machado
  8. Farm Size and the Cross-Section of Farm Returns By Noumir, Ashraf; Langemeier, Michael R.
  9. State-level Food Waste Policies In the U.S.: A Predictive Modelling By Kilic, Gizem
  10. Mobilising common biocultural heritage for the socioeconomic inclusion of small farmers: panarchy of two case studies on quinoa in Chile and Bolivia By Thierry Winkel; Lizbeth Núñez-Carrasco; Pablo José Cruz; Nancy Egan; Luís Sáez-Tonacca; Priscilla Cubillos-Celis; Camila Poblete-Olivera; Natalia Zavalla-Nanco; Bárbara Miño-Baes; Maria-Paz Viedma-Araya
  11. Carbon leakage and agriculture: A literature review on emissions mitigation policies By Theodoros Arvanitopoulos; Grégoire Garsous; Paolo Agnolucci
  12. Free Power, Irrigation and Groundwater Depletion: Impact of the Farm Electricity Policy of Punjab, India By Gupta, Disha
  13. Developing consumption-based emissions indicators from Agriculture, Forestry and Land-use (AFOLU) activities By Grégoire Garsous
  14. The Billion Dollar Corn Question: What Can We Learn from China's Policy Interventions in the Corn Processing Industry By Hu, Zhepeng
  15. Nonlinear weather and climate-induced effects on hired farm labor wages: Evidence from the U.S. Cornbelt By Njuki, Eric
  16. Economic Impacts of the 'Buy Local' Trend By Ray, Susweta; Giannakas, Konstantinos
  17. Modelling the cost-effective spatio-temporal allocation of conservation measures in agricultural landscapes facing climate change By Gerling, Charlotte; Drechsler, Martin; Keuler, Klaus; Leins, Johannes A.; Radtke, Kai; Schulz, Björn; Sturm, Astrid; Wätzold, Frank
  18. Quantifying Vulnerability of Crop Yields in India to Weather Extremes By Kulkarni, Kedar
  19. Does Adoption of Improved Agricultural Technologies Impact Welfare, Poverty and Food Security in the Sahelian Region of West Africa? By Awotide, Bola Amoke; Ogunniyi, Adebayo; Olagunju, Kehinde Oluseyi; Manda, Julius; Alene, Arega; Nguena, Christian Lambert; Manyong, Victor; Abdoulaye, Tahirou
  20. Can access to irrigation reduce migration flow? Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa By Kafle, Kashi
  21. Irrigation Organizations: Water Storage and Delivery Infrastructure By Hrozencik, Aaron; Wallander, Steven; Aillery, Marcel
  22. Economic impact of paratuberculosis and control measures in dairy herds. By Rasmussen, Philip; Hall, David C.
  23. Effect of Microinsurance on Child Work and Schooling: Evidence from Northern Kenya and Southern Ethiopia By Son, Hyuk
  24. The Impact of "Grow to Sell" Agricultural Extension on Smallholder Horticulture Farmers: Evidence from a Market- Oriented Approach in Kenya By Satoshi Shimizutani; Shimpei Taguchi; Eiji Yamada; Hiroyuki Yamada
  25. Global food prices, local weather and migration in Sub-Saharan Africa By Ludolph, Lars; Sedova, Barbora
  26. A study on impacts of the institutional environment and climate change on sustainability of agriculture – the case of Bulgaria By Bachev, Hrabrin
  27. The Loop Effect: How Climate Change Impacts the Mitigation Potential of the French Forest Sector By Philippe Delacote; Antonello Lobianco; Sylvain Caurla; Jean-Daniel Bontemps; Anna Lungarska; Pierre Mérian; Miguel Riviere; Ahmed Barkaoui
  28. 20 Years of CFTC Data: Who Holds Positions in Agricultural Futures Markets? By Robe, Michel A.; Roberts, John S.
  29. Do political motivations affect recovery from natural disasters? Evidence from floods in India By Chauhan, Tarana
  30. The Impact of Food Recall on Fresh Meat Market in the U.S. By Zhou, Pei; Liu, Yizao
  31. COVID-19 lockdown and exposure of households to food insecurity in Uganda: insights from a high frequency phone survey By Agamile, Peter
  32. Scaling up Index-based Flood Insurance (IBFI) for agricultural resilience and flood-proofing livelihoods in developing countries By Amarnath, Giriraj; Malik, Ravinder Paul Singh; Taron, Avinandan
  33. Leverage, Liquidity and Agricultural Cooperative Profitability By Miranda, Mario J.; Chen, Meng-Fen
  34. Potential market and welfare effects of genetically edited technology in U.S. soybean production By Lee, Yunkyung
  35. Price incentives and unmonitored deforestation: Evidence from Indonesian palm oil mills By Valentin GUYE; Sebastian KRAUS
  36. Optimizing the water quality monitoring network by maximizing the economic value of information By Destandau François; Zaiter Youssef
  37. Assessing the Effect of Noisy Data on Duality Estimates By Rosas, Juan Francisco; Lence, Sergio H.
  38. Spice Based Rural Economy of North Eastern Hill Region of India: Value Chain Analysis of Organically Produced Major Spices By Singh, Ram; Passah, Sukheimon; Singh, NA; Feroze, SM; Choudhury, Anju; Devi, LG; Larinsangpuii, Larinsangpuii; Devi, A.A.; Kumar, Shiv; Jhahjria, A.; Pal, Suresh
  39. The Economic Benefit of Applying Spatial Error Model to Agronomic Field Trial Data Analysis By Li, Xiaofei
  40. The Effect of Free School Meals on Household Food Purchases: Evidence from the Community Eligibility Provision By Michelle M. Marcus; Katherine G. Yewell
  41. Natural resources and technology - on the mitigating effect of green tech By Wendler, Tobias; Töbelmann, Daniel; Günther, Jutta
  42. Cost Implications of Participant Product Selection in USDA’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) By Saitone, Tina L.; Li, Xuemei; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sexton, Richard J.
  43. Adverse Rainfall Shocks and Child Outcomes: Evidence from Rural Vietnam By Pham, Trinh
  44. Impacts of Quality Seeds of Improved Legume Varieties on Incomes and Poverty in Mozambique: An Ordered Choice Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis By Wiredu, Alexander Nimo; Manda, Julius; Feleke, Shiferaw; Asante, Bright Owusu; Savala, Canon Engoke; Kyei-Boahen, Stephen; Manyong, Victor; Alene, Arega
  45. DID DEMAND SHOCK IN RESTAURANT SECTOR DURING COVID-19 AFFECT FOOD SECURITY? By Shiraj, Molla Mursaleen
  46. Plant-based Meat: a competitor to Organic and Grass-fed By Lim, Kar Ho; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
  47. Price-Yield Covariance Effects on Producers’ Risk Profile and Risk Response By Motamed, Mesbah J.
  48. The rise and fall of the energy-carbon Kuznets curve: Evidence from Africa By Olatunji A. Shobande; Simplice A. Asongu
  49. Do Property Rights Affect the Efficiency and Intrahousehold Labor Allocations of Rural Ethiopian Households? By Kieran, Caitlin
  50. Taste of green: Consumer sensory ratings of pasture-raised beef with different process quality information By Ohlau, Marlene
  51. Impact of USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) on Rural and Urban Economies in the Aftermath of the Great Recession By Vogel, Stephen; Miller, Cristina; Ralston, Katherine
  52. Gender Differences in Agricultural Technology Adoption and Crop Productivity: Evidence from Malawi By Tufa, Adane; Alene, Arega; Cole, Steven M.; Manda, Julius; Feleke, Shiferaw; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Chikoye, David; Manyong, Victor M.
  53. What Shapes Cognitions of Climate Change in Europe? Ideology, Morality and the Role of Educational Attainment By Heinz Welsch
  54. Depicting eaters and non-eaters of abnormal fruits and vegetables: Reflections of self-identity and food culture By Gervaise Debucquet; Cindy Lombart; Blandine Labbé-Pinlon
  55. Do Droughts Drive Deforestation? Evidence from Mozambique By Hobbs, Andrew
  56. The Market for Chicken Raised Without Antibiotics, 2012–17 By Page, Elina T.; Short, Gianna; Sneeringer, Stacy; Bowman, Maria

  1. By: Xiao, Wuzheqian
    Keywords: International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314039&r=
  2. By: Bueno Rezende De Castro, André
    Keywords: Marketing, International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313863&r=
  3. By: Mottaleb, Khondoker A.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Production Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313899&r=
  4. By: Park, Dojin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314032&r=
  5. By: Ahn, Soojung; Steinbach, Sandro
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, International Development, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313864&r=
  6. By: Bohorquez-Penuela, Camilo
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313994&r=
  7. By: Gustavo Bittencourt Machado (UFBA - Universidade Federal da Bahia, LADYSS - Laboratoire Dynamiques Sociales et Recomposition des Espaces - UP - Université de Paris - UPN - Université Paris Nanterre - UP8 - Université Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
    Abstract: "This paper, entitled Productivist agricultural systems to multifunctional agriculture in the cocoa agrarian system, in Bahia, Brazil, aims to understand the processes of knowledge transmission in the history and transformation of the cocoa agrarian system, considering the regional economic crisis that has been maintained since the 1990s, coming from the crisis of monoculture of the agricultural commodity. The transformations in rural areas are due to the expansion of rural settlements and, from a technical point of view, the transition from partially productive agriculture to agroecological and multifunctional agriculture through family agriculture and new agrarian reform settlements. Partially productivist because of the agricultural production systems in the cocoa region of the state of Bahia that has been structured, in the Atlantic Forest biome, of tropical forest, in cabruca production systems, recently recognized, as an Origin Indication (Geographical Indication), by the National Institute of Industrial Property (INPI), including, historically, those patron systems, that preserved the forest, in the secular cabruca system, where the cacao was planted under secondary tropical forest, maintaining the extensive green of the south coast of the state of Bahia."
    Keywords: multifunctional agriculture,cocoa,agrarian system,affectivity and reflexive expectations
    Date: 2021–10–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03374907&r=
  8. By: Noumir, Ashraf; Langemeier, Michael R.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313880&r=
  9. By: Kilic, Gizem
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314091&r=
  10. By: Thierry Winkel (CEFE - Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive - UPVM - Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3 - Montpellier SupAgro - Centre international d'études supérieures en sciences agronomiques - EPHE - École pratique des hautes études - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - IRD [France-Sud] - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Lizbeth Núñez-Carrasco; Pablo José Cruz; Nancy Egan; Luís Sáez-Tonacca; Priscilla Cubillos-Celis; Camila Poblete-Olivera; Natalia Zavalla-Nanco; Bárbara Miño-Baes; Maria-Paz Viedma-Araya
    Abstract: Valorising the biocultural heritage of common goods could enable peasant farmers to achieve socially and economically inclusive sustainability. Increasingly appreciated by consumers, peasant heritage products offer small farmers promising opportunities for economic, social and territorial development. Identifying the obstacles and levers of this complex, multi-scale and multi-stakeholder objective requires an integrative framework. We applied the panarchy conceptual framework to two cases of participatory research with small quinoa producers: a local fair in Chile and quinoa export production in Bolivia. In both cases, the "commoning" process was crucial both to bring stakeholders together inside their communities and to gain outside recognition for their production and thus achieve social and economic inclusion. Despite the differences in scale, the local fair and the export market shared a similar marketing strategy based on short value chains promoting quality products with high identity value. In these dynamics of biocultural heritage valorisation, the panarchical approach revealed the central place as well as the vulnerability of the community territory. As a place of both anchoring and opening, the community territory is the privileged space where autonomous and consensual control over the governance of common biocultural resources can be exercised.
    Keywords: inclusive agriculture,participatory action research,smallholder farmers,food market,adaptive cycle,panarchy,Chenopodium quinoa Willd,Bolivia,Chile,biocultural heritage,short value chain,territorial development
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:ird-02381132&r=
  11. By: Theodoros Arvanitopoulos; Grégoire Garsous; Paolo Agnolucci
    Abstract: The risks of carbon leakage associated with climate policies in the agricultural sector remains under-researched. Studies to date suggest that carbon pricing policies implemented by a single country, or small group of countries, reduce global emissions but also affect the international competitiveness of these countries’ agricultural sectors and induce carbon leakage. While carbon leakage can be prevented with trade-related measures that adjust emissions prices at the border, such measures applied in developed countries could potentially lead to significant welfare losses for developing countries that heavily rely on agricultural exports. That said, important caveats apply to the reviewed studies: i) from an environmental perspective, estimations of carbon leakage rates alone do not offer a comprehensive assessment of how optimally agricultural activities are allocated across countries; ii) most of the studies estimate the effects of additional environmental policies, such as carbon taxes, and ignore the effects of existing policies, including market distorting and potentially environmentally harmful support for agricultural production.
    Keywords: Climate change, Environmental policies, Trade
    JEL: F18 O13 Q15 Q17 Q54
    Date: 2021–10–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oec:agraaa:169-en&r=
  12. By: Gupta, Disha
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313922&r=
  13. By: Grégoire Garsous
    Abstract: Understanding consumption-based emissions from Agriculture, Forestry and Land-use (AFOLU) activities is important in developing climate policy for the sector. This paper proposes a new methodology to construct indicators – CBAFOLU indicators ‒ to provide estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions arising from AFOLU activities (including fisheries) in the global supply chain of finished products. The CBAFOLU indicators identify the countries where emissions are generated and the countries where the goods that “embody” these emissions are eventually consumed. CBAFOLU indicators are provided for bilateral flows of emissions for 65 countries over 2005-15. The indicators also break down emissions by types of GHG: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and CO2 emissions from land use, land-use change, and forestry (LULUCF). Given their preliminary nature, the CBAFOLU indicators should be seen as a first building block in a series of steps to explore the allocation of AFOLU activities across countries through the lens of sustainability; priorities for further work to refine the indicators are also proposed.
    Keywords: Climate change, Environmental policies, Trade
    JEL: F18 O13 Q15 Q17 Q54
    Date: 2021–10–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:oec:agraaa:171-en&r=
  14. By: Hu, Zhepeng
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313961&r=
  15. By: Njuki, Eric
    Keywords: Production Economics, International Development, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313959&r=
  16. By: Ray, Susweta; Giannakas, Konstantinos
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314000&r=
  17. By: Gerling, Charlotte; Drechsler, Martin; Keuler, Klaus; Leins, Johannes A.; Radtke, Kai; Schulz, Björn; Sturm, Astrid; Wätzold, Frank
    JEL: Q57
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242352&r=
  18. By: Kulkarni, Kedar
    Keywords: International Development, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Risk and Uncertainty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313879&r=
  19. By: Awotide, Bola Amoke; Ogunniyi, Adebayo; Olagunju, Kehinde Oluseyi; Manda, Julius; Alene, Arega; Nguena, Christian Lambert; Manyong, Victor; Abdoulaye, Tahirou
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315119&r=
  20. By: Kafle, Kashi
    Keywords: International Development, Consumer/Household Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314026&r=
  21. By: Hrozencik, Aaron; Wallander, Steven; Aillery, Marcel
    Abstract: In 2018, 40 percent of all water applied to irrigated cropland came from an off-farm water source. Irrigation districts, ditch companies, acequias, and other water delivery organizations use infrastructure such as canals, reservoirs, and turnouts to transport, store, and deliver off-farm water to farms and ranches. This infrastructure is a critical part of an organization’s ability to meet the water needs of irrigated agriculture. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 2019 Survey of Irrigation Organizations is a nationally representative review of the water management organizations that deliver water to farms or influence on-farm groundwater use. This report leverages these survey data to provide an overview of the vital irrigation infrastructure owned and managed by water delivery organizations.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy, Farm Management, Industrial Organization, Land Economics/Use, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–10–19
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:314931&r=
  22. By: Rasmussen, Philip; Hall, David C.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314025&r=
  23. By: Son, Hyuk
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314040&r=
  24. By: Satoshi Shimizutani (JICA Ogata Sadako Research Institute for Peace and Development); Shimpei Taguchi (JICA Ogata Sadako Research Institute for Peace and Development); Eiji Yamada (JICA Ogata Sadako Research Institute for Peace and Development); Hiroyuki Yamada (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)
    Abstract: This paper evaluates the impact of a market-oriented agricultural extension program called Smallholder Horticulture Empowerment and Promotion (SHEP) in Kenya. The SHEP approach prioritizes practical training for farmers to act as producers in a market by encouraging decentralized decision-making. Using a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) over a two-year period, we find that, on average, SHEP increased horticultural income significantly by 70% and the positive effect was more pronounced in vulnerable households whose head of household is female, less educated or older. The effect is not relevant to horticultural experience prior to the intervention. Our findings suggest that a market-oriented agricultural extension can provide a pathway to improve the living standards of small-scale farmers through an increase in horticultural income.
    Keywords: Agricultural extension, Smallholder Horticulture Empowerment Promotion (SHEP), Kenya, Randomized controlled trial (RCT), Impact evaluation
    JEL: I23 J26
    Date: 2021–10–17
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:keo:dpaper:2021-020&r=
  25. By: Ludolph, Lars; Sedova, Barbora
    JEL: O15 O55 Q56 Q54
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242334&r=
  26. By: Bachev, Hrabrin
    Abstract: Achieving diverse goals of sustainable development greatly depends on the specific socio-economic, institutional and natural environment in a particular country, industry, region, community, etc. Despite its importance, in Bulgaria, like in other East European countries, there are very few empirical studies on impact(s) of institutional environment and climate change on agrarian sustainability. This paper incorporates the interdisciplinary New Institutional Economics, and assesses the impact of major elements of institutional environment and climate change on agrarian sustainability in Bulgaria. First, the methodological framework is outlined. After that the impacts of various components of institutional environment and climate change on agrarian sustainability evaluated. Finally, conclusions with implications for further research are presented. The study is based on in-depth interviews with managers of “representative” market-oriented farms of different juridical type, size, specialization, and ecological and geographical location. Institutional components most contributing to improvement of agrarian sustainability at current state of development are: personal connections, available information for prices, markets, innovations, etc., established reputation, existing trust, and existing possibilities for free contracting. Factors mostly deterring sustainable agrarian development are: existing conflicts over agrarian resources, investment possibilities and obstacles, existing monopoly and power positions, and climate change. Studies of this type are to be further expended as precision and representation increased though improving methods, data sources, and cooperation with interested parties.
    Keywords: Governance, Institutional environment, Climate change, Agrarian Sustainability
    JEL: Q1 Q12 Q13 Q15 Q16 Q18
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:110262&r=
  27. By: Philippe Delacote (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Antonello Lobianco (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Sylvain Caurla (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Jean-Daniel Bontemps (LIF - Laboratoire d'Inventaire Forestier - ENSG - École nationale des sciences géographiques - IGN - Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière [IGN] - Université Gustave Eiffel); Anna Lungarska (ECO-PUB - Economie Publique - AgroParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Pierre Mérian (LERFoB - Laboratoire d'Etudes des Ressources Forêt-Bois - ENGREF - Ecole Nationale du Génie Rural, des Eaux et des Forêts - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique); Miguel Riviere (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Ahmed Barkaoui (BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Objectives: Evaluate the capacity of temperate forest resources to both provide climate change mitigation and to sustain the downstream timber sector explicitly considering the cascade of biophysical and economic drivers (in particular, climate change impacts and subsequent adaptation actions) and their uncertainty. Methodology: A recursive bio-economic model of French forest resources, management, and timber markets has been coupled for this study with spatial statistical models of forest response to climate change long-term scenarios and land-use change. Main Results: (a) Climate change impacts on tree mortality are greater than those on tree growth variations; (b) Due to increasing competition with agriculture, climate change may reverse current trends in forest area expansion; (c) Due to rising average tree sizes, volume growth strongly declines over time and may eventually cease within the next century; (d) Future climate change impacts already have strong consequences on today's forest investment profitability; (e) The relative importance of forest substitution over forest sequestration increases as the timeframe increases; (f) While the forest sector has the potential to counterbalance a significant share of the national carbon emissions, this potential is threatened by climate change and the need to adapt to it. Profit-driven forest management does increase mitigation; (g) Uncertainty derived from using different climatic models over the same IPCC storyline has the same order of magnitude as the uncertainty derived from using the same climatic model under different storylines.
    Abstract: Objectifs : Évaluer la capacité des ressources forestières tempérées à atténuer le changement climatique et à soutenir le secteur du bois en aval, en tenant compte explicitement de la cascade de facteurs biophysiques et économiques (en particulier, les impacts du changement climatique et les mesures d'adaptation ultérieures) et de leur incertitude. Méthodologie : Un modèle bio-économique récursif des ressources forestières françaises, de la gestion et des marchés du bois a été couplé pour cette étude avec des modèles statistiques spatiaux de la réponse des forêts aux scénarios à long terme du changement climatique et au changement d'utilisation des terres. Principaux résultats : (a) Les impacts du changement climatique sur la mortalité des arbres sont plus importants que ceux sur les variations de croissance des arbres ; (b) En raison de la concurrence croissante avec l'agriculture, le changement climatique pourrait inverser les tendances actuelles d'expansion des zones forestières ; (c) En raison de l'augmentation de la taille moyenne des arbres, la croissance en volume diminue fortement au fil du temps et pourrait finalement cesser au cours du prochain siècle ; (d) Les impacts futurs du changement climatique ont déjà de fortes conséquences sur la rentabilité des investissements forestiers d'aujourd'hui ; (e) L'importance relative de la substitution des forêts par rapport à la séquestration des forêts augmente à mesure que le délai s'allonge ; (f) Alors que le secteur forestier a le potentiel de contrebalancer une part importante des émissions nationales de carbone, ce potentiel est menacé par le changement climatique et la nécessité de s'y adapter. La gestion forestière axée sur le profit augmente effectivement l'atténuation ; g) l'incertitude découlant de l'utilisation de différents modèles climatiques pour le même scénario du GIEC a le même ordre de grandeur que l'incertitude découlant de l'utilisation du même modèle climatique pour différents scénarios.
    Keywords: Forest sector,Climate change,Carbon balance,Climate warming,Mitigation,Bio-economic model
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03088086&r=
  28. By: Robe, Michel A.; Roberts, John S.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313995&r=
  29. By: Chauhan, Tarana
    Keywords: International Development, International Development, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313852&r=
  30. By: Zhou, Pei; Liu, Yizao
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313942&r=
  31. By: Agamile, Peter
    Keywords: Marketing, International Development, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313950&r=
  32. By: Amarnath, Giriraj (International Water Management Institute); Malik, Ravinder Paul Singh (International Water Management Institute); Taron, Avinandan (International Water Management Institute)
    Abstract: This research report presents the first comprehensive framework of business models in terms of developing, marketing and scaling Index-based flood insurance (IBFI). The report evaluated ten case studies on agricultural insurance schemes (macro, meso and micro levels), globally, to develop public-private partnership business models for creating value (product development) and capturing value (product marketing). This report highlights four broad groups of interrelated factors that influence the uptake and scaling of agricultural insurance: (i) behavioral factors that influence farmers’ enthusiasm to invest in insurance; (ii) financial factors that stipulate governments’ willingness to provide financial support; (iii) legal and regulatory factors, which set ground rules for fair business and govern their adherence by stakeholders; and (iv) facilitating factors, including product design and development, business models, research and development, data availability, and awareness creation, which help ensure an efficient supply of insurance services. In summary, the report highlights the need for designing innovative IBFI and its potential benefits for uptake, and efforts for implementing IBFI as a potential risk transfer tool for comprehensive climate risk management among small-scale and marginal farmers.
    Keywords: flooding/resilience/agricultural insurance/crop insurance/livelihoods/developing countries/scaling/disaster risk management/risk transfer/business models/product development/marketing/public-private partnerships/stakeholders/state intervention/financial institutions/microfinance/smallholders/farmers/awareness raising/climate change/satellite observation/rivers/rain/flood damage/crop losses/compensation/subsidies/legal aspects/economic aspects/social aspects/drought/case studies
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:rerpts:h050608&r=
  33. By: Miranda, Mario J.; Chen, Meng-Fen
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314012&r=
  34. By: Lee, Yunkyung
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Production Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314058&r=
  35. By: Valentin GUYE (INRAE et Mercator Research Institute for Global Commons and Climate Change Berlin (MCC)); Sebastian KRAUS (MCC)
    Abstract: We create a novel, spatially explicit microeconomic panel of Indonesian palm oil mills, to provide the first estimates of deforestation price elasticities based on observations of the actual prices paid at mill gates. To identify the price elasticity, we spatially model how deforestation in upstream plantations is exposed to downstream, conditionally exogenous, shocks on mill-gate prices. We provide the first evidence that deforestation for smallholder plantations, and illegal deforestation, are price elastic. This implies that a price instrument can disincentivize deforestation where it is most difficult to monitor, and contain leakages from conservation regulations.
    Keywords: Deforestation, price elasticity, oil palm, Indonesia,
    JEL: Q5
    Date: 2021–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fae:wpaper:2021.11&r=
  36. By: Destandau François (UMR GESTE - Gestion Territoriale de l'Eau et de l'environnement - ENGEES - École Nationale du Génie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement de Strasbourg - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Zaiter Youssef
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03373506&r=
  37. By: Rosas, Juan Francisco; Lence, Sergio H.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313951&r=
  38. By: Singh, Ram; Passah, Sukheimon; Singh, NA; Feroze, SM; Choudhury, Anju; Devi, LG; Larinsangpuii, Larinsangpuii; Devi, A.A.; Kumar, Shiv; Jhahjria, A.; Pal, Suresh
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314986&r=
  39. By: Li, Xiaofei
    Keywords: Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314062&r=
  40. By: Michelle M. Marcus; Katherine G. Yewell
    Abstract: We find evidence that exposure to universal free school meals through the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) had a meaningful impact on grocery spending for households with children, with monthly food purchases declining by about $11, or 5 percent. For households in zip codes with higher exposure, the decline is as high as $39 per month, or 19 percent. We also show evidence that the composition of food purchases changes, with low income households experiencing an increase in the dietary quality of their food purchases by about 3 percent after CEP. Finally, we show CEP exposure is associated with an 11 percent decline in the percent of households that ran short of money or tried to make their food money go further, and an almost 5 percent decline in households classified as food insecure. Our results on the heterogeneous effects of CEP exposure by prior free/reduced price lunch eligibility reveal large benefits in terms of both spending, dietary composition, and food insecurity for previously eligible low-income families, suggesting that the stigma of free school meals may be declining after universal access.
    JEL: H51 I12 I38
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:29395&r=
  41. By: Wendler, Tobias; Töbelmann, Daniel; Günther, Jutta
    JEL: Q01 Q55 Q56 Q58
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:vfsc21:242416&r=
  42. By: Saitone, Tina L.; Li, Xuemei; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sexton, Richard J.
    Abstract: USDA’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is the third-largest food assistance program in the United States. WIC participants are required to select fixed quantities of WIC-approved foods except for fruits and vegetables, for which they receive a cash-value voucher. Participants may lack an explicit economic incentive to minimize food costs by shopping at low-cost WIC-authorized vendors or selecting less expensive products, brands, or packages of foods. Thus, each WIC State agency faces the challenge of simultaneously controlling program costs and supporting participants’ satisfaction by providing options when they shop for WIC foods. WIC State agencies seek to strike this balance in a multitude of ways. One of the most common cost-containment tools is to require participants to purchase the least expensive brand (LEB) of a WIC-authorized product in some food categories. However, the WIC food packages were last revised in 2009, and little is known about the current cost implications of WIC participants choosing expensive brands, products, and package sizes. This study is the first to estimate the potential cost savings from limiting participant choice through LEB policies. We use administrative data on WIC transactions from California and IRI retail scanner data to estimate these potential cost savings for the most frequently redeemed food instruments and extrapolate the information to the State level for a period of over 2 years. The estimated savings associated with LEB policy implementation in California range from $16.1 million to $30.5 million annually.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Demand and Price Analysis, Financial Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–10–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:314933&r=
  43. By: Pham, Trinh
    Keywords: International Development, Consumer/Household Economics, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314051&r=
  44. By: Wiredu, Alexander Nimo; Manda, Julius; Feleke, Shiferaw; Asante, Bright Owusu; Savala, Canon Engoke; Kyei-Boahen, Stephen; Manyong, Victor; Alene, Arega
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:315294&r=
  45. By: Shiraj, Molla Mursaleen
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313860&r=
  46. By: Lim, Kar Ho; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313866&r=
  47. By: Motamed, Mesbah J.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314082&r=
  48. By: Olatunji A. Shobande (University of Aberdeen, UK); Simplice A. Asongu (Yaoundé, Cameroon)
    Abstract: Purpose – This paper provides an analysis of the energy-carbon Kuznets curve hypothesis (CKC) using a second-generation panel methodology. Design/methodology/approach – Specifically, we investigate whether energy consumption, natural resources, and governance explain the CKC proposition. Our empirical strategy is based on the Westerlund panel cointegration test, augmented mean group (AMG), and vector autoregressive (VAR) panel Granger-causality tests. Findings – The results suggest that the CKC hypothesis is incomplete without these mechanisms, as they play a critical role in reducing carbon emissions in Africa. We recommend improving the environmental standards and proper regulatory and monitoring systems to reduce carbon emissions and promote sustainable development in the continent. Originality/value –The study revisits the CKC hypothesis with particular emphasis on governance and more robust empirical estimation techniques.
    Keywords: carbon cuts; Energy consumption; Governance; Climate crisis; Panel analysis; Africa
    Date: 2021–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:exs:wpaper:21/069&r=
  49. By: Kieran, Caitlin
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, International Development, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313971&r=
  50. By: Ohlau, Marlene
    Keywords: Marketing, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313969&r=
  51. By: Vogel, Stephen; Miller, Cristina; Ralston, Katherine
    Abstract: This report traces the impacts of USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefit outlays on the rural and urban economies during the post-recession years 2009–14. The macroeconomic stimulus effects of the expenditures of SNAP benefit outlays generated larger economic impacts in the urban economy than the rural economy, when measured in total dollars and numbers of jobs. However, when measured as shares of total output, income, and employment, SNAP’s stimulus effects generated larger impacts in the rural economy. These larger rural impacts were attributed to two factors: (1) The farm and food processing sectors represented larger shares of the rural economic base than of the urban industrial base; and (2) urban SNAP expenditures generated large spillover impacts in the rural economy.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Consumer/Household Economics, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Food Security and Poverty, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Public Economics
    Date: 2021–10–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:314934&r=
  52. By: Tufa, Adane; Alene, Arega; Cole, Steven M.; Manda, Julius; Feleke, Shiferaw; Abdoulaye, Tahirou; Chikoye, David; Manyong, Victor M.
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:314960&r=
  53. By: Heinz Welsch (University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics)
    Abstract: Cognitions about climate change are of critical importance for climate change mitigation as they influence climate-relevant behaviors and the support of climate policy. Using about 30,000 observations from a large-scale representative survey from 23 European countries, this study provides two major findings. First, important policy-relevant climate change cognitions do not only differ by individuals’ ideological identity (left versus right) but – independently – by their moral identity, that is, the pattern of endorsement of the moral foundations: Care, Fairness, Liberty, Loyalty, Authority and Purity/Sanctity. In particular, controlling for ideological position the cognitions that the world climate is changing, that climate change is human-made, and that climate change impacts are bad are significantly negatively related to stronger endorsement of the Authority and Sanctity foundations while being positively related to stronger endorsement of the Loyalty and Fairness foundations. Second, not only the ideology-related cognitive divide but the morality-related divide is larger in individuals with tertiary education, consistent with the idea that individuals with greater science literacy and numeracy use these skills to adjust their cognitions to their group identity. The finding that better education may amplify rather than attenuate the ideology and morality dependence of decision-relevant climate change cognitions sheds doubt on the proposition that better education unambiguously furthers the prospects for climate change mitigation.
    Keywords: climate change cognition; identity-protective cognition; ideological identity; moral identity; moral foundations; educational attainment
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:old:dpaper:438&r=
  54. By: Gervaise Debucquet (Audencia Recherche - Audencia Business School); Cindy Lombart (Audencia Recherche - Audencia Business School); Blandine Labbé-Pinlon (Audencia Recherche - Audencia Business School)
    Abstract: To reduce food waste, retailers have been offering non-calibrated fruits and vegetables (FaVs) in recent years, yet the acceptance of such produce is still far from unanimous. Using reciprocal projections, our research performs a comparative analysis of French consumers' representations of eaters and non-eaters of misshapen FaVs. The overall representations rest on lexical registers that refer to economic, ecological, and sociocultural rationales. Results highlight two opposing representations of the two customer segments studied. Ugly FaVs thus reactivate current tensions that are challenging the traditional French food model. The dominant and positive description of eaters of ugly FaVs is manifested as an implicit defense of a particular French food identity that values cooking with natural and special products. Conversely, the description of non-eaters of imperfect FaVs points to the erosion of this identity in favor of a more pragmatic relationship with food, one that values standardized products. Thus, the sustainability of offering misshapen FaVs depends on the retailers' ability to reduce tensions linked to contrasting food identities by implementing educational actions aimed at children and/or immersive point-of-purchase campaigns.
    Keywords: Ugly fruits and vegetables,food identity,self-identity,mirroring effect,qualitative study
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03379585&r=
  55. By: Hobbs, Andrew
    Keywords: International Development, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314023&r=
  56. By: Page, Elina T.; Short, Gianna; Sneeringer, Stacy; Bowman, Maria
    Abstract: This report estimates consumer retail expenditure distributions and prices of chicken products labeled raised without antibiotics (RWA) between 2012 and 2017 and characterizes the demographics of households that purchased RWA-labeled chicken products. The analysis considered three different chicken product market segments: classic, processed, and sausage. Using household scanner data merged with a dataset of poultry product label claims, the results reveal household expenditures for RWA-labeled products grew substantially within each of the three market segments. The average price per pound for RWA-labeled chicken products was also considerably higher than conventional products within each market segment. Additionally, households that purchased RWA-labeled chicken products were on average larger, had higher incomes, were more likely to have a primary food shopper with a college degree, and were more likely to report being very concerned about antibiotic use in meat production.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Consumer/Household Economics, Financial Economics, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing, Public Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–09–22
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:usdami:315418&r=

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