nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2021‒10‒11
fifty-nine papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. The impacts of reforming agricultural policy support on cereal prices: A CGE modeling approach By Balie, Jean; Valera, Harold Glenn A.; Narayanan Gopalakrishnan, Badri; Pede, Valerien O.
  2. Misallocation in Indian Agriculture By Marijn Bolhuis; Swapnika Rachapalli; Diego Restuccia
  3. Ecological-economic scenarios of land-use for biodiversity and ecosystem services in the New Aquitaine region By Ny Andraina Andriamanantena; Charly Gaufreteau; Jean-Sauveur Ay; Luc Doyen
  4. Farmers' preferences towards organic farming: Evidence from a discrete choice experiment in Northern Vietnam By Tiet, Tuyen; Nguyen-Van, Phu; Pham, Thi Kim Cuong; Stenger, Anne; To-The, Nguyen; Boun My, Kene; Nguyen, Huy
  5. Farming with Alternative Pollinators benefits pollinators, natural enemies, and yields, and offers transformative change to agriculture By Stefanie Christmann; Youssef Bencharki; Soukaina Anougmar; Pierre Rasmont; Moulay Smaili; Athanasios Tsivelikas; Aden Aw-Hassan
  6. Addressing Food Safety Challenges in Rapidly Changing Food Systems By Unnevehr, Laurian
  7. Climate Change, The Food Problem, and the Challenge of Adaptation through Sectoral Reallocation By Ishan Nath
  8. What factors affect the preferences of farmers for local irrigation water management? By Perez-Quesada, Gabriela; Hendricks, Nathan P.; Vossler, Christian A.; Steward, David R.; Zhao, Jinhua
  9. Analysis of Agricultural Productivity in Paraguay: A MICRO Econometric Approach By Gatti, Nicolás
  10. A Comparative Analysis of Inbred and Hybrid Rice Performance in Bangladesh: Why is Hybrid Rice Not Popular? By Mottaleb, Khondoker A.; Mainuddin, Mohammed; Alam, Mahbubul; Maniruzzaman, Md.; Schmidt, Erik
  11. Analysis of the Benefits of the Paycheck Protection Program on the U.S. Agricultural Sector By Giri, Anil; Peterson, E. Wesley F.; Subedi, Dipak; McDonald, Tia M.
  12. Online Purchasing of Agricultural Inputs by American Farmers By Monaco, Lourival C.; Mohammadi, Z. Mati; Utech, Hailey; Gray, Allan W.; Brewer, Brady E.; Downey, Scott; Keshavarz, Masoomeh
  13. The impact of nontraditional irrigation water on consumers’ perception of food and non-food items: A field experiment in the United States By Tsigkou, Stavroula; Messer, Kent D.; Kecinski, Maik; Li, Tongzhe
  14. Drivers of Food Safety Risks in Aquatic Products in China: A Bayesian Network approach By Jin, Cangyu; Bouzembrak, Yamine; Zhou, Jiehong; Liang, Qiao; Marvin, Hans
  15. Fear of the water or something else? Evaluating consumer willingness to pay for food products amid COVID-19 outbreak possibly from a Hubei “Wet Market” By Chen, Xuan; Hu, Wuyang; Qing, Ping; Li, Jian
  16. A Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) Approach for Analyzing Value of Research- A Case Study on Pusa Basmati Rice in India By Palani Samy, Venkatesh; Pal, Barun Dep; Vellaichamy, Sangeetha; Renjini, V. R.; Kumar, Pramod; Girish Kumar, Jha
  17. The Swedish consumer market for organic and conventional milk: A demand system analysis By Lindström, Hanna
  18. Rwanda's Agricultural Transformation Revisited: Stagnating Food Production, Systematic Overestimation, and a Flawed Performance Contract System By Sebastian Heine
  19. Are small farms really more productive than large farms? By Fernando Aragon; Diego Restuccia; Juan Pablo Rud
  20. Optimal Hub Location in the U.S. Fresh Produce Supply Chain By Ge, Houtian; Cohen, Samantha; Gomez, Miguel I.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy; Rehkamp, Sarah; Yi, Jing
  21. Agricultural Supply Response under Extreme Market Events and Policy Shocks By Arita, Shawn; Cooper, Joseph C.; Gerlt, Scott; Meyer, Seth D.; Thompson, Wyatt; Westhoff, Patrick
  22. PREFERENCES FOR PAYMENT FOR ECOSYSTEMS SERVICES ATTRIBUTES IN FOREST MANAGEMENT By Yehouenou, Lauriane S.; Grogan, Kelly A.; Yehouenou, Lauriane S.; Morgan, Stephen N.
  23. Effect of Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT) policy on fertilizer sales in India By K.V., Praveen; SINGH, ALKA; KS, Aditya; Girish Kumar, Jha; Kumar, Pramod; Raj, Kingsly I.
  24. Statistical model for making informed decisions on the purchase of used farm equipment By Baxter, Jackson O.; Delmond, Anthony R.; Mehlhorn, Sandy; Cole, John; Mehlhorn, Joey E.
  25. Overcoming coordination gaps between water, energy and agriculture: Future paths to water protection in Weser-Ems By Meergans, Franziska; Aue, Christina; Knieper, Christian; Kochendörfer, Sascha; Lenschow, Andrea; Pahl-Wostl, Claudia
  26. Price transmission for organic and conventional milk products in Sweden By Lindström, Hanna
  27. Welfare Implications of Expanding Conditional Cash Transfer Policy in Agriculture: Preliminary Evidences under Fiscal-Neutral and Deficit Policy Choices for India By Sedithippa Janarthanan, Balaji; Pal, Barun Dep; Babu, Suresh C.; Pradesha, Angga; M L, Nithyashree; Pal, Suresh
  28. The Impact of Cover Crops and No-Till Systems on Soil Erosion By Chen, Le; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Aglasan, Serkan; Park, Byungyul; Hagen, Stephen; Salas, William
  29. Trade Agreements in the Last 20 Years: Retrospect and Prospect By Beghin, John C; O'Donnell, Jill
  30. Leading the Way - Foreign Direct Investment and Dairy Value Chain Upgrading in Uganda By Campenhout, Bjorn Van
  31. Environmental Drivers of Agricultural Productivity Growth: CO2 Fertilization of US Field Crops By Charles A. Taylor; Wolfram Schlenker
  32. ICTs to Address Information Inefficiencies in Food Supply Chains By Campenhout, Bjorn Van
  33. Food safety and restaurant food By Si, Shuyang; Adalja, Aaron A.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Lin Lawell, C. Y. Cynthia; Zhu, Chen
  34. Group Farming in France: Why Do Some Regions Have More Cooperative Ventures Than Others? By Dorin, Bruno; Agarwal, Bina
  35. Liberal trade policy and food insecurity across the income distribution: an observational analysis in 132 countries, 2014–17 By Barlow, Pepita; Loopstra, Rachel; Tarasuk, Valerie; Reeves, Aaron
  36. Training and Shifting Gender Norms: Evidence from a training intervention in rural Nepal By Janzen, Sarah A.; Magnan, Nicholas; Mullally, Conner C.; Sharma, Shruti
  37. The effect of marketing through cooperatives on income distribution in Brazil By De Carvalho Reis Neves, Mateus; Freitas, Carlos Otavio; De Figueiredo Silva, Felipe; Braga, Marcelo J.; Costa, Davi M.
  38. Food Purchasing Decisions along the Distribution of an Individual Food Retail Quality Measure By Scharadin, Benjamin; Ver Ploeg, Michele L.; Glickman, Alannah; Clark, Jill K.
  39. Papua New Guinea food price bulletin: December 2020 By International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
  40. The capitalisation of CAP subsidies into land rents and land values in the EU By BALDONI Edoardo; CIAIAN Pavel
  41. Strengthening coordination in river basin governance in southern Spain: Cooperation, incentives and persuasion By Schütze, Nora; Thiel, Andreas; Paneque, Pilar; Vargas, Jesús; Vidaurre, Rodrigo
  42. Hierarchical Bayesian Hedonic Regression Analysis of Japanese Rice Wine: Price is Right? By Wakuo Saito; Teruo Nakatsuma
  43. Green Public Procurement: An empirical analysis of the uptake of organic food policy By Lindström, Hanna; Lundberg, Sofia; Marklund, Per-Olov
  44. Agricultural Cooperative Statistics 2019 By Wadsworth, James; Rivera, Judith; Lapp, Kevin
  45. SNAP Work Requirement and Food Insecurity By Das, Debasmita
  46. The effect of illegal fishing on the sustainability of small scale fisheries By Coralie Kersulec; Luc Doyen; HŽl ne Gomes; Fabian Blanchard
  47. Pro-environmental Attitudes, Local Environmental Conditions and Recycling Behavior By Luisa Corrado; Andrea Fazio; Alessandra Pelloni
  48. Taxing Agricultural Income in the Global South: Revisiting Uganda’s National Debate By Stewart-Wilson, Graeme; Waiswa, Ronald
  49. Investigating Heterogeneity in Responses to SNAP Benefit Cycle By Feng, Jinglin; Fan, Linlin; Jaenicke, Edward C.; Ver Ploeg, Michele L.; Gundersen, Craig G.; Page, Elina T.
  50. Changing intrahousehold decision making to empower women in their households: a mixed methods analysis of a field experiment in rural south-west Tanzania By Lecoutere, Els; Chu, Lan
  51. Property Rights and Groundwater Management: A Structural Model of the Dynamic Extraction Game in California By Sears, Louis S.; Lin Lawell, C. Y. Cynthia; Torres, Gerald; Walter, M. Todd
  52. Maladaptation of U.S. Corn and Soybean Yields to a Changing Climate By Yu, Chengzheng
  53. Does Nudging More Vegetable Consumption Result in More Waste? Evidence from a Randomized Dining Experiment By Qi, Danyi; Li, Ran; Penn, Jerrod; Houghtaling, Bailey; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Roe, Brian E.
  54. Pudding, Plague and Education: trade and human capital formation in an agrarian economy By Pantelis Kammas; Argyris Sakalis; Vassilis Sarantides
  55. Digital Transformation for a Sustainable Agriculture: Opportunities and Challenges By Khanna, Madhu
  56. Cooperation on climate change and ongoing urbanization By Shibly Shahrier; Koji Kotani; Yoshinori Nakagawa
  57. Rising Temperatures Reduce Economic Output of Food Processing Firms in China By Chen, Xiaoguang; Khanna, Madhu; Yang, Lu
  58. Facilitating Inclusive ICT Application and e-Commerce Development in Rural China By Huang, Jikun
  59. Household Food Waste Reduction Developments: A Comparison of Progress in the EU and the US By Zaat, Sara

  1. By: Balie, Jean; Valera, Harold Glenn A.; Narayanan Gopalakrishnan, Badri; Pede, Valerien O.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313939&r=
  2. By: Marijn Bolhuis; Swapnika Rachapalli; Diego Restuccia
    Abstract: We exploit substantial variation in land-market institutions across Indian states and detailed micro household-level panel data to assess the effect of distortions in land rental markets on agricultural productivity. We provide empirical evidence that states with more rental-market activity feature less misallocation and reallocate land more efficiently over time. We develop a model of heterogeneous farms and land rentals to estimate land-market distortions in each state. Land rentals have substantial positive effects on agricultural productivity: an efficient reallocation of land increases agricultural productivity by 38 percent on average and by more than 50 percent in states with highly distorted rental markets. Both farm and state-level land market distortions are quantitatively important, with state-level wedges accounting for a significant fraction of rental market participation differences across states. Land market distortions contribute about one-third to the large differences in agricultural total factor productivity across Indian states.
    Keywords: Productivity, agriculture, distortions, land rentals, states, India.
    JEL: O4 O5 O11 O14 E01 E13
    Date: 2021–10–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-709&r=
  3. By: Ny Andraina Andriamanantena; Charly Gaufreteau; Jean-Sauveur Ay; Luc Doyen
    Abstract: The synergies and trade-offs between human well-being, biodiversity, and ecosystem services are under debate for the design of more sustainable public policies. In that perspective, there is a need of quantitative methods to compare all these outcomes under alternative policy scenarios. The present paper provides climate consistent scenarios at the horizon 2053 for the New-Aquitaine region in France. They rely on spatio-temporal models derived from individual land-use choices under climate change. The models are estimated at the national level from 1993-2003 Þne-scale data. We focus on farming, forestry, and urban land-uses along with bird biodiversity scores and a basket of ecosystem services: carbon sink carbon sink intensity, forest recreation, and water pollution. A Þrst Ôclimate-economic adaptation' scenario shows that climate-induced land-use worsens the negative effects of climate change on biodiversity and several ecosystem services in the long run as compared to a Ôstatus quoÕ scenario. A second scenario with an incentive policy, based on a ßat payment for pastures, slightly mitigates these negative impacts on biodiversity and water pollution. However, this turns out to be detrimental for others ecosystem services. This result conÞrms that the design of sustainable policies can not be limited to uniform strategies and should account for the complexity of ecosystem management.
    Keywords: Model-based scenarios; climate; land-use; incentive policy; birds biodiversity; ecosystem services
    JEL: Q51 Q54 Q57
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:grt:bdxewp:2021-18&r=
  4. By: Tiet, Tuyen; Nguyen-Van, Phu; Pham, Thi Kim Cuong; Stenger, Anne; To-The, Nguyen; Boun My, Kene; Nguyen, Huy
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313946&r=
  5. By: Stefanie Christmann (ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas [Maroc] - ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - CGIAR - Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research [CGIAR]); Youssef Bencharki (ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas [Maroc] - ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - CGIAR - Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research [CGIAR]); Soukaina Anougmar (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas [Maroc] - ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - CGIAR - Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research [CGIAR]); Pierre Rasmont (UMONS - University of Mons [Belgium]); Moulay Smaili (INRA Maroc - Institut national de la recherche agronomique [Maroc]); Athanasios Tsivelikas (ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas [Maroc] - ICARDA - International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - CGIAR - Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research [CGIAR]); Aden Aw-Hassan
    Abstract: Low-and middle-income countries cannot afford reward-based land sparing for wildflower strips to combat pollinator decline. Two small-grant projects assessed, if an opportunity-cost saving landsharing approach, Farming with Alternative Pollinators, can provide a method-inherent incentive to motivate farmers to protect pollinators without external rewards. The first large-scale Farmingwith-Alternative-Pollinators project used seven main field crops in 233 farmer fields of four agroecosystems (adequate rainfall, semi-arid, mountainous and oasis) in Morocco. Here we show results: higher diversity and abundance of wild pollinators and lower pest abundance in enhanced fields than in monocultural control fields; the average net-income increase per surface is 121%. The higher income is a performance-related incentive to enhance habitats. The income increase for farmers is significant and the increase in food production is substantial. Higher productivity per surface can reduce pressure on (semi)-natural landscapes which are increasingly used for agriculture. Land-use change additionally endangers biodiversity and pollinators, whereas this new pollinator-protection approach has potential for transformative change in agriculture.
    Date: 2021–09–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03355596&r=
  6. By: Unnevehr, Laurian
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313802&r=
  7. By: Ishan Nath
    Abstract: This paper combines local temperature treatment effects with a quantitative macroeconomic model to assess the potential for global reallocation between agricultural and non-agricultural production to reduce the costs of climate change. First, I use firm-level panel data from a wide range of countries to show that extreme heat reduces productivity less in manufacturing and services than in agriculture, implying that hot countries could achieve large potential gains through adapting to global warming by shifting labor toward manufacturing and increasing imports of food. To investigate the likelihood that such gains will be realized, I embed the estimated productivity effects in a model of sectoral specialization and trade covering 158 countries. Simulations suggest that climate change does little to alter the geography of agricultural production, however, as high trade barriers in developing countries temper the influence of shifting comparative advantage. Instead, climate change accentuates the existing pattern, known as “the food problem,” in which poor countries specialize heavily in relatively low productivity agricultural sectors to meet subsistence consumer needs. The productivity effects of climate change reduce welfare by 6-10% for the poorest quartile of the world with trade barriers held at current levels, but by nearly 70% less in an alternative policy counterfactual that moves low-income countries to OECD levels of trade openness.
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cen:wpaper:21-29&r=
  8. By: Perez-Quesada, Gabriela; Hendricks, Nathan P.; Vossler, Christian A.; Steward, David R.; Zhao, Jinhua
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314020&r=
  9. By: Gatti, Nicolás
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313804&r=
  10. By: Mottaleb, Khondoker A.; Mainuddin, Mohammed; Alam, Mahbubul; Maniruzzaman, Md.; Schmidt, Erik
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313898&r=
  11. By: Giri, Anil; Peterson, E. Wesley F.; Subedi, Dipak; McDonald, Tia M.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313915&r=
  12. By: Monaco, Lourival C.; Mohammadi, Z. Mati; Utech, Hailey; Gray, Allan W.; Brewer, Brady E.; Downey, Scott; Keshavarz, Masoomeh
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural Finance, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313987&r=
  13. By: Tsigkou, Stavroula; Messer, Kent D.; Kecinski, Maik; Li, Tongzhe
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Environmental Economics and Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313940&r=
  14. By: Jin, Cangyu; Bouzembrak, Yamine; Zhou, Jiehong; Liang, Qiao; Marvin, Hans
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313965&r=
  15. By: Chen, Xuan; Hu, Wuyang; Qing, Ping; Li, Jian
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314010&r=
  16. By: Palani Samy, Venkatesh; Pal, Barun Dep; Vellaichamy, Sangeetha; Renjini, V. R.; Kumar, Pramod; Girish Kumar, Jha
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313973&r=
  17. By: Lindström, Hanna (a The Department of Economics at Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden)
    Abstract: Increasing the production of organic food is becoming an important environmental target for many governments, and consumer demand for organic food is pivotal in reaching these targets. This paper studies consumer demand for organic and conventional milk, using weekly scanner data from the Swedish retail market for the years 2011–2017. Own- and cross-price elasticities of demand are estimated using a quadratic almost ideal demand system. While previous studies on this topic show that demand for organic milk is commonly more price elastic than for its conventional alternative, this paper complements previous literature by (i) studying a market with relatively small organic price premiums, (ii) using a highly representative sample of retailers, and (iii) differentiating between private labels and brands. Results show that demand for organic milk is relatively elastic, despite relatively small organic price premiums in the Swedish milk market. Results also show that demand for branded products is, generally, less elastic compared to private label products, suggesting that consumers have strong preferences for traditional, regional brands.
    Keywords: Environmental policy analysis; Organic food policy; Demand system analysis
    JEL: D12 Q11 Q18
    Date: 2021–10–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:hfiwps:0021&r=
  18. By: Sebastian Heine (Department of Economics, SOAS University of London)
    Abstract: Sustained productivity growth in the agricultural sector is a key component of a country's path out of poverty. The quantitative development of Rwanda's agriculture in recent years has been widely regarded as a success story and as further evidence for the effectiveness of its government to bring about sustained socio-economic progress. However, simple statistical analysis of publicly available data shows that food crop production volumes and yields have actually stagnated over the last fifteen years. Moreover, agricultural output was significantly overestimated from 2008-2013 and then silently corrected downwards in Rwandan and international datasets. As a result, the country's economic growth numbers are very likely inflated as well. After presenting substantive evidence for these claims, this paper discusses three issues arising from them. First, it argues that yield-raising effects of massive mineral fertiliser application and other 'Green Revolution' technologies were offset by the enormous disruption resulting from the government's rigorously enforced agricultural reform programme. Second, it finds that massive food crop production overestimation likely proliferated due to a flawed performance-based governance system that incentivised bureaucrats and farmers to tweak the numbers instead of compelling them to achieve actual results. Even more, this inflation prevented early detection of agricultural stagnation and consequently also the required adaptation of agricultural policy. Third, the exceptional 'brand-building' capabilities of the Rwandan ruling elite led to the preservation of its false reputation of having achieved skyrocketing yield growth. As a silver lining, a few recently revised reform components point to the possibility of an eventually more successful agricultural transformation, whose chances might hinge on the government's ability to allow more discretion of bureaucrats and more inclusion of local knowledge.
    Keywords: Rwanda; agricultural transformation; agricultural statistics; performance contracts; state effectiveness
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:soa:wpaper:242&r=
  19. By: Fernando Aragon; Diego Restuccia; Juan Pablo Rud
    Abstract: This paper shows that using yields may not be informative of the relationship between farm size and productivity in the context of small-scale farming. This occurs because, in addition to productivity, yields pick up size-dependent market distortions and decreasing returns to scale. As a result, a positive relationship between farm productivity and land size may turn negative when using yields. We illustrate the empirical relevance of this issue with microdata from Uganda and show similar findings for Peru, Tanzania, and Bangladesh. In addition, we show that the dispersion in both measures of productivity across farms of similar size is so large that it renders farm size an ineffective indicator for policy targeting. Our findings stress the need to revisit the empirical evidence on the farm size-productivity relationship and its policy implications.
    Keywords: Farm size, productivity, yields, land markets, distortions, agriculture, policy.
    JEL: O12 O13 Q12 Q15
    Date: 2021–10–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tor:tecipa:tecipa-708&r=
  20. By: Ge, Houtian; Cohen, Samantha; Gomez, Miguel I.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy; Rehkamp, Sarah; Yi, Jing
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314019&r=
  21. By: Arita, Shawn; Cooper, Joseph C.; Gerlt, Scott; Meyer, Seth D.; Thompson, Wyatt; Westhoff, Patrick
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313930&r=
  22. By: Yehouenou, Lauriane S.; Grogan, Kelly A.; Yehouenou, Lauriane S.; Morgan, Stephen N.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313934&r=
  23. By: K.V., Praveen; SINGH, ALKA; KS, Aditya; Girish Kumar, Jha; Kumar, Pramod; Raj, Kingsly I.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Agricultural Finance, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313945&r=
  24. By: Baxter, Jackson O.; Delmond, Anthony R.; Mehlhorn, Sandy; Cole, John; Mehlhorn, Joey E.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313876&r=
  25. By: Meergans, Franziska; Aue, Christina; Knieper, Christian; Kochendörfer, Sascha; Lenschow, Andrea; Pahl-Wostl, Claudia
    Abstract: This paper constitutes one of six analyses of cross-sectoral challenges in water governance. These have been conducted as part of the STEER research project and results are published in separate analyses and position papers. While the agricultural sector and food industry of the region of Weser-Ems in Lower Saxony have brought about economic prosperity, they have also posed challenges to the environment, and water quality in particular. Intensive animal farming is considered the main source of nitrate pollution in groundwater, a trend that has been further reinforced by the promotion of non-fossil fuel energy sources and increased biogas production in the region. Against this backdrop, coordination of the water, (bio)energy and agricultural sectors is key to establishing Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in the region and thereby reducing nitrate levels in the groundwater. This paper is based on the analysis of coordination and cooperation among local and regional stakeholders which takes account of i) legal and regulatory structures, ii) water management processes and iii) the socio-ecological conditions. It shows that groundwater protection in the region of Weser-Ems has for two decades been characterised by the same trade-off between the barely coordinated policies of the water, (bio)energy and agricultural sectors. The problem thus remains as pressing as ever. The lack of sufficient coordination between Germany's Renewable Energy Act (EGG) and its Fertiliser Ordinance (DüV) is inconsistent with growing international recognition of the need for coherent and integrated policy solutions to the management of natural resources such as groundwater. For many years, the German agricultural policy, of central importance for water resources management, was geared solely to profitability in agriculture, neglecting the considerable social and environmental costs of this approach. It is not yet possible to gauge the extent to which the amendment of the Fertiliser Ordinance in 2020 and the designation of nitrate vulnerable zones have led to effective integration. In order to reduce nitrate pollution in the region of Weser-Ems and similar regions of Germany in the long term, we make the following recommendations in this paper: * improve legislative coordination in the water, energy and agricultural sectors, * expand and promote successful (local) projects (e.g. whole-farm approach), * transform intensive farming into business models combining profitability with ecological compatibility (e.g. organic farming), * support this by integrating practical knowledge into the development of new policy instruments, and * elevate water protection issues in agricultural training.
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:diebps:252020&r=
  26. By: Lindström, Hanna (a The Department of Economics at Umeå School of Business, Economics and Statistics, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden)
    Abstract: Although much empirical work addresses the efficiency of food supply chains by studying price transmission, studies on quality-differentiated food are scarce, and particularly for organic food vis-á-vis conventional food. This study adds to this scarce literature by analysing wholesale to retail price transmission for organic and conventional milk in the Swedish milk sector, using time-series analysis applied to monthly price data for the period Jan 2007–Nov 2017. Estimations are performed using the non-linear ARDL model which allows for asymmetric cointegration of prices and a simultaneous analysis of short- and long-run asymmetry, the latter of which has been largely overlooked in previous studies. In the case of conventional milk, results indicate positive asymmetries both in the short-run and the long-run. For organic milk, the long-run positive asymmetry is smaller and not statistically significant in all specifications. Organic consumers are therefore likely to experience smaller differences between surplus losses and gains, following positive and negative wholesale price changes, respectively.
    Keywords: Price transmission; organic food; non-linear ARDL
    JEL: C22 L11 Q13
    Date: 2021–10–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:hfiwps:0022&r=
  27. By: Sedithippa Janarthanan, Balaji; Pal, Barun Dep; Babu, Suresh C.; Pradesha, Angga; M L, Nithyashree; Pal, Suresh
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313953&r=
  28. By: Chen, Le; Rejesus, Roderick M.; Aglasan, Serkan; Park, Byungyul; Hagen, Stephen; Salas, William
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314005&r=
  29. By: Beghin, John C; O'Donnell, Jill
    Abstract: We provide an overview of major developments in multi- and plurilateral trade agreements over the last 20 years with a focus on the implications for agricultural and food markets. We take stock of what has been accomplished in market integration, remaining obstacles to trade, events that have changed the trade landscape, and emerging issues. Agricultural tariffs have fallen through commitments made in the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture and through the proliferation of regional trade agreements. Nevertheless agricultural trade remains distorted with some prohibitive tariffs. RTAs have achieved progress on nontariff measures and other beyond-the-border frictions. The WTO’s negotiations on agricultural distortions have stalled because of their complexity and divergent interests among WTO members. In addition, the dispute settlement mechanism of the WTO has been seriously impaired as its Appellate Body can no longer function. The WTO will have to adjust to a world of RTAs and use its tools and procedures to support the multilateral trading system through increasing transparency of RTAs and reporting on conformity with existing WTO agreements. The WTO can also use substitute tools to head off disputes using specific trade concern mechanisms, like those of the SPS and TBT committees.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2021–10–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nbaesp:314115&r=
  30. By: Campenhout, Bjorn Van
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313806&r=
  31. By: Charles A. Taylor; Wolfram Schlenker
    Abstract: We assess the CO 2 fertilization effect on US agriculture using spatially-varying CO 2 data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite covering the majority of US cropland under actual growing conditions. This study complements the many CO 2 enrichment experiments that have found important interactions between CO 2 and local environmental conditions in controlled settings. We use three empirical strategies: (i) a panel of CO 2 anomalies and county yields, (ii) a panel of spatial first-differences between neighboring counties, and (iii) a cross-sectional spatial first-difference. We find consistently high fertilization effects: a 1 ppm increase in CO 2 equates to a 0.5%, 0.6%, and 0.8% yield increase for corn, soybeans, and wheat, respectively. Viewed retrospectively, 10%, 30%, and 40% of each crop's yield improvements since 1940 are attributable to rising CO 2 .
    JEL: N52 Q11 Q54
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:29320&r=
  32. By: Campenhout, Bjorn Van
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313801&r=
  33. By: Si, Shuyang; Adalja, Aaron A.; Gomez, Miguel I.; Lin Lawell, C. Y. Cynthia; Zhu, Chen
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313906&r=
  34. By: Dorin, Bruno; Agarwal, Bina
    Keywords: Farm Management
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313803&r=
  35. By: Barlow, Pepita; Loopstra, Rachel; Tarasuk, Valerie; Reeves, Aaron
    Abstract: Background. Eradicating food insecurity is necessary for achieving global health goals. Liberal trade policies may increase food supplies but how these policies influence individual-level food insecurity remains uncertain. Methods. We combined Food and Agricultural Organization data from 460,102 persons in 132 countries, 2014-2017, with a country-level trade policy index from the Konjunkturforschungsstelle (KOF) Swiss Economic Institute. We examined the association between a country’s trade policy score and the probability of reporting ‘moderate/severe’ food insecurity using regression models and algorithmic weighting procedures. We control for multiple covariates, including GDP, democratization, and population size. We further examined heterogeneity by country- and household-income. Results. Liberal trade policy was not significantly associated with moderate/severe food insecurity after covariate adjustment. However, among households in high-income countries with incomes larger than $25,430 per person per year, a unit increase in the trade policy index (more liberal) corresponded to a 0·07 % (95% CI: -0·10% to -0·04%) reduction in the predicted probability of reporting moderate/severe food insecurity. Among households in the lowest income decile (
    Keywords: ES/N017358/1
    JEL: N0 J1
    Date: 2020–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ehl:lserod:104409&r=
  36. By: Janzen, Sarah A.; Magnan, Nicholas; Mullally, Conner C.; Sharma, Shruti
    Keywords: International Development, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314065&r=
  37. By: De Carvalho Reis Neves, Mateus; Freitas, Carlos Otavio; De Figueiredo Silva, Felipe; Braga, Marcelo J.; Costa, Davi M.
    Keywords: Marketing, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314007&r=
  38. By: Scharadin, Benjamin; Ver Ploeg, Michele L.; Glickman, Alannah; Clark, Jill K.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314045&r=
  39. By: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
    Abstract: Prices of major food staples in Kokopo, Lae and Port Moresby have remained broadly stable over 2019 and 2020. The exceptions are prices of sweet potatoes and cooking bananas in Port Moresby, which declined between mid-2019 and the third quarter of 2020. Per kilogram prices of vitamin-dense foods such as broccoli, carrot and karakap are typically higher than prices of starchy staples. Prices of both carrots and broccoli in Lae rose in mid-2020, but have declined in the last quarter of 2020 and October prices were close to their price levels in late 2019. More consistent and timely price data collection and database management is necessary for informative food market analysis. Price data reported in this bulletin by crop and market is limited to 10 observations (at most) out of a possible of 24 fortnights in 2019. The rate of price data reporting has been lower in 2020, in part due to Covid-19 related disruptions.
    Keywords: PAPUA NEW GUINEA, OCEANIA, prices, food prices, legumes, vegetable legumes, markets,
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:pngfpb:december2020&r=
  40. By: BALDONI Edoardo (European Commission - JRC); CIAIAN Pavel (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: The objective of this report is to estimate the capitalization of different Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) subsidies into rental prices and value of land in the EU. We use FADN data at regional level for the period 1989–2016 and apply a dynamic panel approach (GMM estimator) to estimate the capitalization effect of coupled direct payments (CDP), decoupled direct payments (DDP) and rural development measures at EU level. The estimated results suggest the short-run (long-run) capitalization rate of DDP to be between 9.1% and 46.2% (11% and 55%). The heterogeneous DDP models appear to have a lower capitalization rate by between 34% and 37% in the short-run and between 41% and 45% in the long-run as compared to the flat-rate models. The capitalization rate of CDPs is estimated to be around 6% in the short-run and 7% in the long-run. Rural development measures are generally found not to affect land rental prices. Regarding the capitalization estimates for land values, they are not robust and consistent across estimated models. The estimates suggest that only DDPs may cause statistically significant capitalization effects into land values: a capitalization rate between 28.8% and 32.1% in the short-run and between 154% and 164% in the long-run.
    Keywords: CAP, subsidies
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc125220&r=
  41. By: Schütze, Nora; Thiel, Andreas; Paneque, Pilar; Vargas, Jesús; Vidaurre, Rodrigo
    Abstract: This Briefing Paper presents one of six analyses of cross-sectoral coordination challenges that were conducted as part of the STEER research project and on which separate Briefing Papers are available. The European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires member states to achieve a good status for all waters by 2027. Mediterranean countries, including Spain, are facing significant problems of water quantity, which is why one of their main challenges in achieving a good water status is to maintain ecological flows and reduce over-extraction of groundwater. Authorities are confronted with mediating between the competing interests of different water using sectors, such as irrigation, urban water supply and tourism, and non-consumptive uses, such as the environment. Despite recurring requests by scholars and commitments by policy-makers to strengthen cross-sectoral and cross-level coordination to address these trade-offs, coordination deficits remain in the Mediterranean, but also in many other parts of the world. This Briefing Paper examines coordination and implementation challenges between the water and agricultural sectors in relation to water quantity in the context of WFD implementation in the Guadalquivir river basin, southern Spain. These have been identified as: (i) the lack of revision of water rights after the implementation of drip irrigation, (ii) weaknesses in monitoring water use and closing illegal wells, and (iii) limited cross-sectoral exchange during participatory processes. These challenges are interlinked by the underlying difficulty of imposing unpopular decisions against the will of powerful actors in the agricultural sector. To address these challenges, we suggest various coordination instruments based on incentives, voluntary cooperation, persuasion and information exchange. In particular, we recommend the following: * Increase financial and human resources for the revision of water rights, monitoring of water use and closure of illegal wells. * Facilitate cooperative processes to achieve a multisectoral consensus on how and where water rights will be reduced. * Provide incentives for irrigation communities to further strengthen self-control of groundwater use among members. * Strengthen cross-sectoral exchange among stakeholders within participatory processes, especially between environmental and agricultural interest groups and improve communication with citizens. * Use more comprehensive and inclusive ways of providing information in the context of river basin planning. However, since the identified challenges are systemic and relate to fundamental distributional questions, there are limits to the potential of coordination instruments. Thus, a clear indication of political will is also needed.
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:diebps:182020&r=
  42. By: Wakuo Saito (Graduate School of Economics, Keio University); Teruo Nakatsuma (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)
    Abstract: This research formulates a hedonic pricing model for Japanese rice wine, sake, via hierarchical Bayesian modeling, estimating it with a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The data used in the estimation are obtained from Rakuten, the largest online shopping site in Japan. Flavor indicators, premium categories, rice breeds, and regional dummy variables are used as pricing factors. The Bayesian estimation of the model employs an ancillarity-sufficiency interweaving strategy to improve the sampling efficiency of MCMC. The estimation results indicate that Japanese consumers value sweeter sake more and the price reflects the cost of pre-processing rice only for the most luxurious category. No distinctive differences are identified among rice breeds or regions in the hedonic pricing model.
    Keywords: sake, rice breed, hierarchical Bayesian modeling, hedonic pricing model, Markov chain Monte Carlo
    JEL: C13 L11 Q12
    Date: 2021–09–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:keo:dpaper:2021-019&r=
  43. By: Lindström, Hanna (Department of Economics, Umeå University); Lundberg, Sofia (Department of Economics, Umeå University); Marklund, Per-Olov (The National Institute of Economic Research (NIER))
    Abstract: This paper analyses the uptake of a national and voluntary green public procurement policy among Swedish municipalities. The policy, decided in 2006, was intended to contribute to increased organic farming by stipulating that at least 25 percent of public food purchases be organic. Based on survey data on the municipalities’ organic food purchases for the period 2003–2016, supplemented with municipal characteristics, we analyse the determinants underpinning uptake of the policy, accounting for potential selection bias. The main finding is that political goals have a significant and positive effect on the share of organic food purchases, suggesting that there is an uptake and that the voluntary policy is in fact implemented. Secondly, we find that the increase in expenditures per capita devoted to organic food is quite substantial following the adoption of an organic food policy.
    Keywords: Green Public Procurement; organic food policy; selection bias
    JEL: D44 H57 Q18
    Date: 2021–10–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:umnees:0997&r=
  44. By: Wadsworth, James; Rivera, Judith; Lapp, Kevin
    Abstract: Excerpts from the report Introduction: Agricultural cooperative statistics are collected annually and published to provide information on the position and trends among the Nation’s farmer, rancher, and fishery cooperatives. These statistics are used for cooperative benchmarking, research, technical assistance, education, planning, and public policy. The collection, analysis, and dissemination of cooperative statistics by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) are authorized by The Cooperative Marketing Act of 1926. This report presents agricultural cooperative statistics for 2019 in table and chart format and consists of six sections: (I) overall summary cooperative statistics; (II) number of cooperatives, memberships, and employees; (III) business volume by State, and losses; (IV) Top 100 cooperatives; (V) benchmark statistics for cooperative comparisons; and (VI) cooperative statistical trends. Selected highlights are provided at the beginning of each section, and associated tables follow.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Farm Management, Financial Economics
    Date: 2021–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:urdvsr:314106&r=
  45. By: Das, Debasmita
    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program(SNAP) work requirement reinstatement on food insecurity outcomes of able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs). The policy restricts SNAP benefits of ABAWDs to 3 months in a 36 months period if they are not working or participating in any work program for at least 20 hours a week. In the aftermath of the 2008 recession, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 waived work requirements nationwide, and many states reimplemented the work rule at different times beginning in 2011. I employ a difference-in-differences approach utilizing this cross-state variation in the reimplementation of the policy. Using rich information on food affordability and food intake behavior from the Food Security Supplement of the Current Population Survey (CPS-FSS), I find that promoting work for food assistance improved the overall food security status of ABAWDs by reducing disruptions in food intake, anxiety over food affordability and dependency on emergency food receipt. Subsample analyses indicate that effects are stronger for never married and less educated ABAWDs.
    Keywords: Food assistance; SNAP; Food Security; Work Requirement
    JEL: D12 I12 I38
    Date: 2019–11–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:109964&r=
  46. By: Coralie Kersulec; Luc Doyen; HŽl ne Gomes; Fabian Blanchard
    Abstract: Marine ecosystems, biodiversity and Þsheries are under pressure worldwide. To manage these ecosystems and Þsheries in a more sustainable way, many scientists and stakeholders advocate the use of an ecosystem-based Þshery management (EBFM). The idea underlying EBFM is to account for several complexities, including trophic, habitat and socio-economic interactions. Illegal Þshing is an important ingredient among these complexities. We advance the EBFM on the small-scale Þshery of French Guiana, by taking into account the high impact of illegal Þshing in this case study. To achieve this, we rely on a multi-species resource based dynamics and, multi-ßeet model. The model is calibrated using data of Þshing landings and efforts from 2006 to 2017 for 3 species and 4 fleets, as well as a Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) study. The model exhibits the impact of illegal Þshing on the ecosystem and Þshery dynamics. Our results highlight the extensive potential gains in catches and proÞt linked to the reduction of illegal Þshing. Policy recommendations are derived.
    Keywords: Small scale Þsheries; IUU; Sustainability; Multi-species; Multi-ßeet; Swim Bladder
    JEL: Q22 Q57
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:grt:bdxewp:2021-17&r=
  47. By: Luisa Corrado (DEF and CEIS, Università di Roma "Tor Vergata"); Andrea Fazio (Università di Roma La Sapienza); Alessandra Pelloni (DEF, Università di Roma "Tor Vergata")
    Abstract: We investigate some motivations of recycling, using Italian survey data. We find that people declaring an interest in environmental issues or belonging to an environmental association are more likely to recycle. This suggests that the motivations for behaving pro-environmentally have an expressive and noninstrumental motivation. However, we also find that if people perceive to live in a deteriorated environment, they are less likely to recycle. We discuss possible explanations for this finding.
    Keywords: Pro-Environmental Behavior, Intrinsic Motivation, Recycling, Environmental Degradation
    JEL: Q57 Q53 R11 D91
    Date: 2021–09–02
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:513&r=
  48. By: Stewart-Wilson, Graeme; Waiswa, Ronald
    Abstract: The issue of agricultural taxation has almost completely disappeared from the scholarly and policy agendas in recent decades. And yet, agriculture is taxed very lightly despite contributing substantially to GDP across many Global South countries today. In some cases, light-touch taxation may be necessary to encourage investment in the sector and to protect small and subsistence farmers. However, anecdotal evidence from countries like Uganda suggests that there are a substantial number of high-income earners engaged in agricultural activities that are sheltered almost completely from any form of taxation. More effectively taxing these high-income earners could provide much-needed resources to finance public service provision in lower-income countries. The time is ripe, this paper argues, to revitalise discussions about how best to tax the agriculture sector.
    Keywords: Agriculture, Finance,
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:idq:ictduk:16626&r=
  49. By: Feng, Jinglin; Fan, Linlin; Jaenicke, Edward C.; Ver Ploeg, Michele L.; Gundersen, Craig G.; Page, Elina T.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:314018&r=
  50. By: Lecoutere, Els; Chu, Lan
    Abstract: This study assesses the impact of an intervention that challenges gender relations by introducing a more participatory way of intrahousehold decision making on women’s empowerment in monogamous agricultural households in Tanzania. Participatory intrahousehold decision making is introduced through (i) awareness raising couple seminars in which couples go through a self-assessment and group discussion about their intrahousehold division of roles and resources; and through (ii) a subsequent intensive coaching package of activities in which couples are coached by gender officers on how to implement participatory decision making in their household.The study adopts a mixed methods approach, which consists of (i) a quantitative impact assessment of the introduction of participatory intrahousehold decision making on different domains of women’s empowerment, through respectively the couple seminars and randomly encouraged intensive coaching, and (ii) a qualitative component to understand how the changes caused by the interventions fit into women’s own valued aspects and processes of empowerment, by which the study embraces the inherently subjective dimensions of empowerment.The study shows that awareness-raising couple seminars catalysed women’s access to livestock, but not their access to personal income while this is highly valued by women for independently taking minor expenditure decisions for their household’s wellbeing. In line with women’s priorities, intensive coaching in participatory intrahousehold decision making increased women’s control over and accuracy of information about household income earned with coffee. Both couple seminars and intensive coaching increased women’s involvement in strategic farm decisions, which fits women’s wish for effective decision-making power in this domain. Couple seminars contributed to a fairer division of productive and reproductive labour among spouses, which is advantageous to women, even if this was not a key priority from women’s perspective.
    Keywords: Tanzania; intra-household decision making; women empowerment
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iob:dpaper:202106&r=
  51. By: Sears, Louis S.; Lin Lawell, C. Y. Cynthia; Torres, Gerald; Walter, M. Todd
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313908&r=
  52. By: Yu, Chengzheng
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313798&r=
  53. By: Qi, Danyi; Li, Ran; Penn, Jerrod; Houghtaling, Bailey; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Roe, Brian E.
    Keywords: Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:313980&r=
  54. By: Pantelis Kammas; Argyris Sakalis; Vassilis Sarantides
    Abstract: During the late 19th century, the increasing popularity of pudding in England, along with the outbreak of phylloxera plague in French vineyards had an unintended effect in the agrarian economy of Greece. In particular, these events escalated the international demand and production of currants in Greece during the 1870s, causing an unprecedented positive shock that was transmitted through trade in the agricultural population. Using novel data from historical archives, we explore how this exogenous event affected investment towards human capital. Consistent with expectations, in an agrarian economy that specializes in unskilled labour-intensive agricultural goods, this shock had a negative effect on human capital formation.
    Keywords: Education; Fertility; Agriculture; International Trade
    Date: 2021–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hel:greese:164&r=
  55. By: Khanna, Madhu
    Keywords: Farm Management, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313799&r=
  56. By: Shibly Shahrier (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature); Koji Kotani (School of Economics and Management, Kochi University of Technology); Yoshinori Nakagawa (School of Economics and Management, Kochi University of Technology)
    Abstract: Climate change has become a major threat to existence of humankind on earth. Studies demonstrate that climate change gets exacerbated and people become nonprosocial with urbanization (Ehrlich et al., 2012, Wigginton et al., 2016, Shahrier et al., 2016, 2017, Jingchao et al., 2021). It is hypothesized that people’s cooperation on climate change declines as they become nonprosocial with urbanization. To examine the hypothesis, we implement a survey experiment consisting of climate donation (CD) and social value orientation (SVO) games in three areas of a developing country, Bangladesh: (i) rural, (ii) semiurban and (iii) urban ones. In CD game, a respondent splits a fixed endowment between herself and a donation to climate change countermeasures. The analysis reveals that the number of nonprosocials is higher in the semiurban and urban areas than in the rural area, and nonprosocials donate less than do prosocials. It also shows that education, belief in human-induced climate change and natural disasters’ experiences increase the donations. However, the magnitudes of the increases are less than the magnitudes of the decline in donations associated with urbanization and SVO from prosocials to nonprosocials. Overall, this research suggests that cooperation on climate change shall be compromised along with further urbanization, and a new paradigm, such as vision and/or core values for society development and education, will be necessary to counter such a trend.
    Keywords: Cooperation on climate change, urbanization, prosociality, culture and evolution
    Date: 2021–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:kch:wpaper:sdes-2021-8&r=
  57. By: Chen, Xiaoguang; Khanna, Madhu; Yang, Lu
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313797&r=
  58. By: Huang, Jikun
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iaae21:313800&r=
  59. By: Zaat, Sara
    Keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences
    Date: 2021–10–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:cdl:bineur:qt03n5v0t6&r=

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