nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2021‒09‒06
108 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. AGRICULTURAL DIVERSIFICATION AND IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY SHIFTS AMONG SMALLHOLDER FARMERS By Bizimana, Jean Claude; Musumba, Mark
  2. Is beef still for dinner? A meat products AIDS estimation with microdata By Dobrowolska Perry, Agnieszka I.; Brown, D Scott
  3. Sustainable agricultural practices and their adoption in sub-Saharan Africa By GARZON DELVAUX Pedro; RIESGO ALVAREZ Laura; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio
  4. Impacts of Small-Scale Irrigation in Niger By TILLIE Pascal; ELOUHICHI Kamel; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio
  5. Impacts of Violent Conflicts on Food Insecurity in Sub-Saharan Africa By Muriuki, James M.; Hudson, Michael D.
  6. Does Local Food Procurement Improve Farmers' Welfare? Lessons from World Food Program's Purchase for Progress Pilot Program in Ghana By Mulangu, Francis M.; Dadzie, Nicholas
  7. Spatial aggregation of weather variables and its implication in climate change analysis: The case of U.S. Corn and Soybeans By Ji, Yongjie; Miao, Ruiqing
  8. Catalyzing farmers’ irrigation investments: recommendations to scale sustainable rural transformation By Merrey, D. J.; Schmitter, Petra; Namara, R.; McCornick, P. G.
  9. Crop Insurance, Futures Prices, and Commercial Trader Positions in Agricultural Futures Markets By Adjemian, Michael K.; Le, Han; Robe, Michel A.
  10. An Analysis of Crop Insurance Losses, Cover Crops, and Weather in US Crop Production By Aglasan, Serkan; Rejesus, Roderick M.
  11. Implications of farm size and staple production on rural and urban dietary diversity By Lin, Jessie; Gupta, Anubhab
  12. Who benefits from farmer-led irrigation expansion in Ethiopia?. By Kafle, Kashi; Omotilewa, Oluwatoba; Leh, Mansoor
  13. Preference and Access: Agriculture and Overnutrition in Rural Guatemala By Van Asselt, Joanna; Useche, Maria P.
  14. Who participates in agri-environmental schemes? A mixed-methods approach to investigate the role of farmer archetypes in scheme uptake and participation level By Leonhardt, Heidi; Braito, Michael; Uehleke, Reinhard
  15. Crop Residue Burning in India: Agricultural Policy Changes and Consequences By Gulati, Kajal; Hobbs, Andrew
  16. Generational and demographic factors that influence U.S. dairy demand - evidence from an AIDS estimation with household data By Dobrowolska Perry, Agnieszka I.; Brown, D Scott
  17. Nonlinear Food Self-Sufficiency Dynamics: Implications for Food Security and Economic Growth By Chung, Dae Hee; Suh, Dong Hee
  18. Presumed vs. actual technology adoption: Impact on household food and nutrition security By Jovanovic, Nina; Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob
  19. Estimating Elasticities Via Market Share Impacts for Crop Insurance Coverage Options By Bulut, Harun; Hennessy, David A.
  20. The diffusion of small-scale irrigation technologies in Ethiopia: stakeholder analysis using Net-Map By Bryan, E.; Hagos, Fitsum; Mekonnen, D.; Gemeda, D. A.; Yimam, S.
  21. Heterogeneity in the in-situ value of groundwater based on an agricultural land market By Kovacs, Kent; Rider, Shelby
  22. Impacts of agricultural produce cess (tax) reform options in Tanzania By RICOME Aymeric; ELOUHICHI Kamel; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio
  23. The Interaction of Convenience and Market Structure in Food Markets By Davis, George C.; Gupta, Anubhab
  24. Leasing Farmland in Kansas: A Study of Landowners’ and Young Producers’ Willingness-to-Lease By Arnold, Chelsea; Taylor, Mykel R.
  25. Demand and supply of specialty crop supply elasticities: Insights from a profession-wide survey By Tregeagle, Daniel; Plakias, Zoë
  26. Cropland Supply Response in China and the Implications for Conservation Policies By Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhan
  27. Pass-through of unfair trading practices in EU food supply chains By BARATHOVA Katarina; CACCHIARELLI Luca; DI FONZO Antonella; LAI Mara; LEE Hyejin; MENAPACE Luisa; POKRIVCAK Jan; RAHBAUER Sebastian; RAJCANIOVA Miroslava; RUSSO Carlo; SORRENTINO Alessandro; SWINNEN Johann; VANDERVELDE Senne
  28. The influences of extreme weather stress and water quality on the evaluation of beef carcass By Ha, Sang Su; Min, Doohong; Dahlke, Garland
  29. Estimating the Value of Disease Regulation Services Under Climate Change: A Bioeconomic Model of Coffee Leaf Rust and Shade-grown Coffee By Ghorbani, Khashayar; Atallah, Shadi S.
  30. Impact of COVID-19 in dairy products consumption in Ecuador By Santillan, Pamela S.; Sandoval M, Luis A.
  31. FUTURES-BASED FORECASTS OF US CROP PRICES By Poghosyan, Armine; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
  32. Climate change impacts and adaptation in Europe. JRC PESETA IV final report. By FEYEN Luc; CISCAR MARTINEZ Juan Carlos; GOSLING Simon; IBARRETA RUIZ Dolores; SORIA RAMIREZ Antonio; DOSIO Alessandro; NAUMANN Gustavo; RUSSO Simone; FORMETTA Giuseppe; FORZIERI Giovanni; GIRARDELLO Marco; SPINONI Jonathan; MENTASCHI Lorenzo; BISSELINK Bernard; BERNHARD Jeroen; GELATI Emiliano; ADAMOVIC Marko; GUENTHER Susann; DE ROO Arie; CAMMALLERI Carmelo; DOTTORI Francesco; BIANCHI Alessandra; ALFIERI Lorenzo; VOUSDOUKAS Michail; MONGELLI Ignazio; HINKEL Jochen; WARD P.j.; GOMES DA COSTA Hugo; DE RIGO Daniele; LIBERTA' Giorgio; DURRANT Tracy; SAN-MIGUEL-AYANZ Jesus; BARREDO CANO Jose Ignacio; MAURI Achille; CAUDULLO Giovanni; CECCHERINI Guido; BECK Pieter; CESCATTI Alessandro; HRISTOV Jordan; TORETI Andrea; PEREZ DOMINGUEZ Ignacio; DENTENER Franciscus; FELLMANN Thomas; ELLEBY Christian; CEGLAR Andrej; FUMAGALLI Davide; NIEMEYER Stefan; CERRANI Iacopo; PANARELLO Lorenzo; BRATU Marian; DESPRÉS Jacques; SZEWCZYK Wojciech; MATEI Nicoleta-Anca; MULHOLLAND Eamonn; OLARIAGA-GUARDIOLA Miguel
  33. Nationally representative estimates of the cost of adequate diets, nutrient level drivers, and policy options for households in rural Malawi By Schneider, Kate R.
  34. Food Banks and Food Retailing By Hamilton, Stephen F.; Lowrey, John; Richards, Timothy J.
  35. Consumer Willingness to Reduce Food Waste At Home By Young, Alicia M.; Riley, John M.
  36. Grasping Impacts of COVID-19 on Diversified Farming Operations – Perspectives of Farmers and Cooperative Extension Agents By Liang, Chyi-Lyi; Tarpeh, Grace
  37. Are smallholder farmers credit constrained? evidence on demand and supply constraints of credit in Ethiopia and Tanzania By Balana, B.; Mekonnen, D.; Haile, B.; Hagos, Fitsum; Yimam, S.; Ringler, C.
  38. Assessing the Engagement of New Mexico’s Agricultural Businesses in Succession Planning By Hayes, Taylor E.; Robinson, Chadelle R.H.
  39. Marketing Strategies for Value-added Foods as a Path to Recovery for Local Producers? By Spalding, Ashley; Kiesel, Kristin
  40. Water Footprint of Food Quality Schemes By Antonio Bodini; Sara Chiussi; Michele Donati; Valentin Bellassen; Áron Török; Liesbeth Dries; Dubravka Ćorić; Lisa Gauvrit; Efthimia Tsakiridou; Edward Majewski; Bojan Ristic; Zaklina Stojanovic; Jose Maria Gil Roig; Apichaya Lilavanichakul; Nguyễn Quỳnh An; Filippo Arfini
  41. Stimulating green production through the public procurement of final products – the case of organic food By Jörgensen, Christian
  42. Specialized, Diversified, or Alternative On-farm Enterprises for Small Farms? Examining Returns and Trade-offs using Multinomial Endogenous Switching Regression By Ojha, Renu; Khanal, Aditya R.
  43. Recency effects of drought and government disaster payments on crop insurance decisions in the Southern Great Plains By Lambert, Lixia H.; Hagerman, Amy D.
  44. Risk and Parameters Selection for the Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) Insurance Program By Zapata, Samuel D.; García, José María
  45. Vegetable production: land use perspective By Kurkalova, Lyubov A.; Hashemi Beni, Leila; Liang, Chyi-Lyi
  46. The Impacts of Technological Progress on GHG Emissions, Water Resources, and Land Use By Haqiqi, Iman; Aqababaei, Monireh
  47. Synthetic control methods for the distribution of treatment effects: Estimating the effect of genetic engineering on crop yields By Tolhurst, Tor N.; Gammans, Matthew
  48. Global Agricultural Value Chains and Structural Transformation By Sunghun Lim
  49. Improving ERS's Net Cash Income Forecasts using USDA Baseline Projections By Kuethe, Todd H.; Bora, Siddhartha S.; Katchova, Ani
  50. Efficiencies of Agricultural Credit Associations with Loan Losses as Undesirable Outputs By He, Yurou; Tauer, Loren W.
  51. The online meal ordering restaurant operator perceptions of online food safety regulations: the case of Shanghai, China By Liu, Weijun; Florkowski, Wojciech J.
  52. The Problems of Farmland Fragmentation and Assessment of Legal Regulations for The Prevention of Farmland Fragmentation in Turkey By Harun Tanrivermis; Amani Uisso
  53. Efficient Portfolios for Cost-Share Funds Allocation in Florida By Soh, Moonwon; Wade, Tara
  54. Economic Contributions of Arkansas Agriculture: A Comparison of Hypothetical Extraction and Export Base Methods By English, Leah A.; Popp, Jennie S.
  55. Dollar Store Expansion and Independent Grocery Retailer Survival By Kim, Donghoon; Lopez, Rigoberto A.; Steinbach, Sandro
  56. Information technology adoption and agrochemical expenditures in China: A heterogeneous analysis By Ma, Wanglin; Zheng, Hongyun
  57. Weather Shocks and Economic Triggers of Cropland Change in the US: A Fine-scale Spatial Analysis By Chen, Luoye; Khanna, Madhu
  58. An Empirical Analysis of the US Residential Water Demand By Bakhtavoryan, Rafael; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
  59. A quality approach to real-time smartphone and citizen-driven food market price data By SOLANO HERMOSILLA Gloria; ADEWOPO Julius; PETER Helen; BARREIRO HURLE Jesus; ARBIA Giuseppe; NARDELLI Vincenzo; GORRIN GONZALEZ Celso; MICALE Fabio; CECCARELLI Tomaso
  60. Can GE Crop Raise Price? Evidence from the impacts of Bt eggplant in Bangladesh By Zilberman, David; Ahsanuzzaman, Ahsanuzzaman
  61. Personality traits and smallholder farmers’ willingness to pay for new technologies: Evidence from Tanzanian bean producers By Morgan, Stephen N.; Farris, Jarrad G.
  62. Role of Institutions in the reducing the transaction costs in vegetable market? Evidence from India By Kedar, Vishnu Shankarrao; Neharkar, Pratibha
  63. Buying Time: The Effect of MFP Payments on the Supply of Grain Storage By Janzen, Joseph; Swearingen, Bryn; Yu, Jisang
  64. The Carbon and Land Footprint of Certified Food Products By Valentin Bellassen; Marion Drut; Federico Antonioli; Ružica Brečić; Michele Donati; Hugo Ferrer-Pérez; Lisa Gauvrit; Viet Hoang; Kamilla Knutsen Steinnes; Apichaya Lilavanichakul; Edward Majewski; Agata Malak-Rawlikowska; Konstadinos Mattas; An Nguyen; Ioannis Papadopoulos; Jack Peerlings; Bojan Ristic; Marina Tomić Maksan; Áron Török; Gunnar Vittersø; Abdoul Diallo
  65. Assessment of COVID-19 Impacts Using the Immediate Impact Model of Local Agricultural Production (IMLAP) By Haqiqi, Iman; Bahalou Horeh, Marziyeh
  66. Gender and Market Participation: Evidence from Ugandan Agriculture By Bird, Samuel; Verma, Sneha
  67. Decomposing Grass-fed Beef Premiums By Wang, Yangchuan; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
  68. Strategic Rejections: Flexible Enforcement of Minimum Quality Standards, with Application to the Fresh Strawberry Market By Hill, Alexandra E.; Sexton, Richard J.
  69. Futures Price Variation and Cash Price Discovery for Feeder Cattle By Anderson, Andrew E.; Schroeder, Ted C.; Hefley, Trevor
  70. New Mexico Grower's Perceptions of the FSMA - Produce Safety Rule By Robinson, Chadelle R.H.; Wade, Brittany A.
  71. Is a shortage of manure a constraint to organic farming? By Nordin, Martin
  72. Consumer Valuation of and Attitudes towards Novel Foods Produced with NPETs: A Review By John C. Beghin; Christopher R. Gustafson
  73. Single plots or shares of land - How modeling of crop choices in bio-economic farm models influences simulation results By Pahmeyer, Christoph; Kuhn, Till; Britz, Wolfgang
  74. Reference price respective grouping in a wine choice experiment – The impact of price expectations on choice behavior and demand By Kilders, Valerie; Caputo, Vincenzina
  75. Bayesian Matrix Determinant Test for Bertrand Competitors: An Application Examining the International Beef Market By Choi, Yejun; Lambert, Dayton M.
  76. Why do Farmers Adopt Soil Conservation Practices? A Theoretical Framework and Literature Review By Ogieriakhi, Macson; Woodward, Richard T.
  77. Consumer valuation of and attitudes towards novel foods produced with NPETs: A review By Beghin, John C.; Gustafson, Christopher R.
  78. Effect of Food Safety Recalls on Consumer Meat Demand: Evidence from Local Meat Product Recalls By Yim, Hyejin; Katare, Bhagyashree
  79. The Causal Impact of Grocery Shopping Lists on Consumer Shopping Behavior By Morrissette, Kendra J.; Lusk, Jayson L.
  80. Rainfall shocks, per capita income and rural out-migration By Nathan Delacrétaz; Bruno Lanz; Amir Delju; Etienne Piguet
  81. Response and Adaptation of Agriculture to Trade Liberalization: A County-level Analysis on the Effects of China-ASEAN Free Trade Agreement By Xing, Mengying; Mao, Rui
  82. What Do We Really Know about Consumer Preferences for Aquaculture Products? By Smetana, Kerri; Melstrom, Richard; Malone, Trey
  83. How to promote tree planting as an agricultural technology that generates positive environmental effects? Evidence from Indonesia By Brenneis, Karina; Wollni, Meike
  84. Fund Flows between the Agricultural Sector and the Non-agricultural Sector in China from 1952 to 2018: A Perspective from Foreign Investment and Labor Transfer By Dong, Qi
  85. Cropping Patterns and Civil Conflict in Sub Saharan Africa By Fatema, Naureen; Kibriya, Shahriar
  86. Process and benefits of community-led multiple use water services: comparing two communities in South Africa By van Koppen, Barbara; Magombeyi, Manuel S.; Jacobs-Mata, Inga; Molose, V.; Phasha, K.; Bophela, T.; Modiba, I.; White, M.
  87. Determining the Impact of Inter-County Food Flows on Food Insecurity in the United States By Beverly, Mariah; Neill, Clinton L.
  88. ANIMAL DISEASES AND MEAT DEMAND: SUBSTITUTIONS MATTER By Wang, Yangchuan; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
  89. Federal Public Land and Quality of Life in Urban Areas By Akhundjanov, Sherzod B.; Jakus, Paul M.
  90. Tailoring rice varieties to consumer preferences induced by cultural and colonial heritage: Lessons from New Rice for Africa (NERICA) in The Gambia By Britwum, Kofi; Demont, Matty
  91. The Impact of Exogenous Pollution on Green Innovation By Wang, Ying; Woodward, Richard T.; Liu, Jingyue
  92. Tariffs, Agricultural Subsidies, and the 2020 US Presidential Election: Unintended Consequences By Choi, Jaerim; Lim, Sunghun
  93. The Illiquidity of Water Markets By Donna, Javier D.; Espin-Sanchez, Jose-A.
  94. Hedonic price analysis of high-quality coffee auctions: El Salvador's cup of excellence case By Sandoval M, Luis A.; Zapata, Samuel D.; Lemus, Juan Gerardo
  95. Factors Influencing Participation or Lack of Participation in Cooperative Extension Service Programming By Lama-Mendoza, Ashley D.; Lillywhite, Jay M.
  96. Economic Spill-Over of Food Quality Schemes on Their Territory By Michele Donati; Adam Wilkinson; Mario Veneziani; Federico Antonioli; Filippo Arfini; Antonio Bodini; Virginie Amilien; Peter Csillag; Hugo Ferrer-Pérez; Alexandros Gkatsikos; Lisa Gauvrit; Chema Gil; Việt Hoàng; Kamilla Knutsen Steinnes; Apichaya Lilavanichakul; Konstadinos Mattas; Orachos Napasintuwong; An Nguyễn; Mai Nguyen; Ioannis Papadopoulos; Bojan Ristic; Zaklina Stojanovic; Marina Tomić Maksan; Áron Török; Efthimia Tsakiridou; Valentin Bellassen
  97. Can Public Health Insurance Improve Diet Quality? — Difference-in-Differences Evidence from Rural China By Chen, Qihui; Pei, Chunchen
  98. Maximum Entropy Moment Preserving Copulas By ShalekBriski, Abby; Devuyst, Eric A.; Brorsen, Wade
  99. Farmer preferences for adopting drought-tolerant maize varieties: evidence from a choice experiment in Nigeria. By Oyetunde-Usman, Zainab; Shee, Apurba
  100. The Geography of Dollar Stores By Grigsby-Calage, Chuck; Mullally, Conner C.; Volpe, Richard J.
  101. The French Affective Images of Climate Change (FAICC): A Dataset With Relevance and Affective Ratings By Sarah Ottavi; Sébastien Roussel; Arielle Syssau
  102. Obesity and Life Expectancy: Why Disaggregation Matters By Zilberman, David; Bansal, Sangeeta
  103. Farm size-performance relationship: A review By GARZON DELVAUX Pedro; RIESGO ALVAREZ Laura; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio
  104. Demand Shocks and Supply Chain Resilience: An Agent Based Modelling Approach and Application to the Potato Supply Chain By Liang Lu; Ruby Nguyen; Md Mamunur Rahman; Jason Winfree
  105. Unlikely Players in Agricultural Lending Market: What Are the Consequences of Agricultural Bank Acquisitions By Kim, Kevin N.; Katchova, Ani
  106. Dynamics and Investments in Forest Carbon Leakage By Liu, Bingcai; Sohngen, Brent; Baker, Justin S.
  107. Commodity price uncertainty comovement: Does it matter for global economic growth? By Ferrara, Laurent; Karadimitropoulou, Aikaterini; Triantafyllou, Athanasios
  108. Do Food Quality Schemes and Net Price Premiums Go Together? By Sylvette Monier-Dilhan; Thomas Poméon; Michael Böhm; Ruzica Brečić; Peter Csillag; Michele Donati; Hugo Ferrer-Pérez; Lisa Gauvrit; José M. Gil; Việt Hoàng; Apichaya Lilavanichakul; Edward Majewski; Agata Malak-Rawlikowska; Konstadinos Mattas; Orachos Napasintuwong; an Quỳnh Nguyễn; Kallirroi Nikolaou; Ioannis Papadopoulos; Stefano Pascucci; Jack Peerlings; Bojan Ristic; Kamilla Steinnes; Zaklina Stojanovic; Marina Tomić Maksan; Áron Török; Mario Veneziani; Gunnar Vittersø; Valentin Bellassen

  1. By: Bizimana, Jean Claude; Musumba, Mark
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312850&r=
  2. By: Dobrowolska Perry, Agnieszka I.; Brown, D Scott
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312814&r=
  3. By: GARZON DELVAUX Pedro; RIESGO ALVAREZ Laura; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: Africa is currently only producing about 10% of global agricultural output while estimated to possess 25% of the world’s arable land. That said, the estimated additional available agricultural land is probably lower than what is generally assumed given the trend in rising rural population density, which, in places is comparable to Asian levels. Moreover, most soils are fragile with low nutrients and organic matter concentration.A "great balancing act" is needed between the increasing and diversifying food and nutrition security (FNS) needs and the resources available. More generically, reaching FNS faces both conventional (demographics) and emerging challenges (climate change). The debate on the sustainability of agriculture requires translation into specific approached and practices. The report gathers a conventional literature review of existing publications (Peer-reviewed journals, major reports and relevant project documents). The material consulted was mostly in English with references to French documents particularly for West and Central African experiences. The key databases consulted were Scopus and Google Scholar.The challenges faced by Africa’s agriculture are very diverse considering a sustainable approach in responding to the regions’ FNS needs. As such, there is no single solution (‘silver bullet’) allowing the sector to sustainably increase its contribution to food supply. Ultimately, opting for a coherent set of approaches or more targeted agricultural practices depends on the great diversity of local contexts (environmental, institutional, seasonal, etc.) as well as characteristics and motivation of individual farmers and their communities. Collective action in the uptake of key practices has been recorded as having produced more sustainable benefits. When looking at each newly adapted practice as innovations it is essential to look towards more coherent, and more importantly, effective sustainable production systems. For FNS intervention to be sustainable, intervention would benefit from adopting a landscape framework so that the various objectives of sustainability can be coherently negotiated alongside pure FNS objectives. Considering land sharing could be particularly relevant for areas with potential agriculture frontier (e.g. Sahel countries, RDC) but also to those were forest "encroachment" is the only remaining frontier given the rising population density. Management approaches that could improve soils emerge as a prerequisite to conventional intensification. As it is the case for input-based intensification of agriculture, the results from the different management-based approaches are not universal and absolute responses cannot be derived from the cases reviewed (including the meta-analyses). Careful targeting and local adaptation remain fundamental ingredients for both improved performance and the long-term adoption of any of the principles and associated practices. A general challenge for adoption is that of timing. Any new practice or approach promoted is expected to provide at least a perceivable improvement in the objectives of farmers in the short-term, when they are generally most sensitive to.
    Keywords: sustainable agricultural practices
    Date: 2020–11
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc121035&r=
  4. By: TILLIE Pascal (European Commission - JRC); ELOUHICHI Kamel; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: In Niger, one of the key objectives of agricultural policy is to promote the development of small-scale irrigation infrastructure in order to diversify agricultural production, extend the growing season, increase land productivity and secure farmers’ incomes. Small-scale irrigation is regarded as a possible alternative to large-scale collective schemes because it is cheaper to set up and maintain and easier to manage. This report presents the results of modelling the impacts of a small-scale irrigation development programme, known as the Stratégie pour la Petite Irrigation au Niger (Small-Scale Irrigation Strategy in Niger, or SPIN for its acronym in French), in terms of land use, agricultural production, income generation and poverty reduction. This analysis was conducted using the FSSIM-Dev (Farm System Simulator for Developing Countries) model and data obtained from a representative national sample of farm households. FSSIM-Dev is a comparative static model using a positive mathematical programming (PMP) approach tailored to producer-consumer households and to the particular aspects of the sub-Saharan rural economy. Applied to each farm household included in a representative sample for Niger, FSSIM-Dev allows for capturing all the heterogeneous impacts of a development programme such as the SPIN. The modelling results show that increasing the irrigated area in the dry season by 47,000 hectares, i.e. 44%, which is in line with the SPIN objectives, would bring significant benefits to Nigerien farm households. The average farm income would increase by 12% and income inequalities between households in rural areas would reduce by around five Gini points, i.e. approximately 9%. Increasing the irrigated area would also create many new jobs and reduce the rural poverty rate by more than one point (from 52.4% to 50.8%). The estimated cost of such a programme would be between 47 billion CFA francs and 189 billion CFA francs, to be split between farmers and the State.
    Keywords: Irrigation, Water, Smallholder, Agricultural Policy, Niger, Policy Impact Assessment
    Date: 2020–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc121218&r=
  5. By: Muriuki, James M.; Hudson, Michael D.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312670&r=
  6. By: Mulangu, Francis M.; Dadzie, Nicholas
    Keywords: International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312649&r=
  7. By: Ji, Yongjie; Miao, Ruiqing
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312795&r=
  8. By: Merrey, D. J.; Schmitter, Petra (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Namara, R.; McCornick, P. G.
    Keywords: Irrigated farming; Investment; Smallholders; Farmer managed irrigation systems; Sustainable agriculture; Rural economics; Business models; Innovation; Technology; Water management; Groundwater; Pumps; Water resources; Institutions; Farmer-led irrigation; Policies
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h050163&r=
  9. By: Adjemian, Michael K.; Le, Han; Robe, Michel A.
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312872&r=
  10. By: Aglasan, Serkan; Rejesus, Roderick M.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312769&r=
  11. By: Lin, Jessie; Gupta, Anubhab
    Keywords: International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312736&r=
  12. By: Kafle, Kashi (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Omotilewa, Oluwatoba (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Leh, Mansoor (International Water Management Institute (IWMI))
    Abstract: Despite increasing popularity of farmer-led irrigation in Ethiopia, little is known about socio-economics of farmers who receive public support in accelerating its expansion. We investigate this question by combining spatial land suitability for groundwater- and solar irrigation with pre-existing socioeconomic data. We find that if public support in farmer-led irrigation expansion were to be provided to farmers who own land areas that are also spatially highly suitable for irrigation, high-value crop cultivators and wealthier farmers would most likely benefit from such investments. Specifically, we find evidence that farmers in land areas more suitable for groundwater irrigation cultivated more high value crops such as vegetables, fruits, and cash crops. Cultivation of staple crops such as cereals, oilseeds, legumes and root crops were negatively associated with groundwater irrigation suitability. In addition, we find a positive correlation between farmers’ wealth status (measured by consumption expenditure, asset index, and land size) and groundwater irrigation suitability. Controlling for regional differences and current irrigation coverage, one percent increase in irrigation suitability score was associated with 0.2% increase in per-capita consumption expenditure. Land areas that were suitable for irrigation were more likely to belong to large-holders than smallholders. Results imply that policies which aim to facilitate farmer-led irrigation development in Ethiopia should not rely only on spatial suitability for irrigation. Household socio-economics and existing agricultural practices are equally important.
    Keywords: Groundwater irrigation; Farmer managed irrigation systems; Socioeconomic environment; Land suitability; Solar energy; Agricultural practices; Crops; Diversification; Cultivation; Land use; Pumps; Households; Living standards; Population density; Farmer-led irrigation; Investment
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h050118&r=
  13. By: Van Asselt, Joanna; Useche, Maria P.
    Keywords: International Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312756&r=
  14. By: Leonhardt, Heidi; Braito, Michael; Uehleke, Reinhard
    Abstract: Increasing farmers' acceptance and adoption of environmentally beneficial farming practices is essential for mitigating negative impacts of agriculture. To support adoption through policy, it is necessary to understand which types of farms or farmers do or do not (yet) apply such practices. However, farmers are not a homogeneous group and their behavior is subject to a complex array of structural, socioeconomic, and socio-psychological influences. Reducing this complexity, farmer typologies or archetypes are useful tools for understanding differing motivations for the uptake of sustainable farming practices. Previous investigations of the role of farmer archetypes in farmers' adoption of environmentally beneficial farming practices rely on either purely qualitative or purely quantitative methods in data collection, typology creation, and hypothesis testing. Our study combines both approaches by classifying survey respondents into farmer types based on a previous Q methodological study. We then use these farmer types in a two-part regression model that aims to explain participation in agri-environmental schemes and the level of scheme participation. To control for farm structural factors, we additionally link our questionnaire data to secondary data from the farm accountancy data network. Results indicate that in Austria, agri-environmental schemes are attractive to all types of farmers, but the level of participation in these schemes differs between archetypes: Profitability-oriented farmers participate less, and nature-oriented farmers participate more than other types. This suggests that monetary compensations for sustainable farming practices are not perceived as sufficient by certain groups of farmers, and policy makers need to consider additional kinds of incentives.
    Keywords: Farmer typology,farmer archetypes,agri-environmental schemes,Q methodology,farmer behavior
    JEL: Q15 Q18 C23
    Date: 2021
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:forlwp:272021&r=
  15. By: Gulati, Kajal; Hobbs, Andrew
    Keywords: International Development, Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312779&r=
  16. By: Dobrowolska Perry, Agnieszka I.; Brown, D Scott
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312813&r=
  17. By: Chung, Dae Hee; Suh, Dong Hee
    Keywords: International Development, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Relations/Trade
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312648&r=
  18. By: Jovanovic, Nina; Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob
    Keywords: International Development, Productivity Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312760&r=
  19. By: Bulut, Harun; Hennessy, David A.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312738&r=
  20. By: Bryan, E.; Hagos, Fitsum (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Mekonnen, D.; Gemeda, D. A.; Yimam, S.
    Abstract: Small-scale irrigation (SSI) provides great benefits to farmers in terms of increased yields and profits, better food and nutrition security and greater resilience to climate shocks. Ethiopia has high potential for expanding SSI and has invested considerably in this area in recent years. Despite these investments, several challenges to further expansion of irrigation technologies remain. Different stakeholders in the country play important roles in overcoming these barriers to further scale technologies for SSI. This paper explores institutional arrangements for the diffusion of small-scale irrigation technologies by mapping the landscape of key actors involved, their interconnections, and their influence. This paper draws on an analysis of stakeholder data collected through two participatory workshops in Ethiopia, one at the national level and one at the Oromia regional level, using the Net-Map approach. Results show the dominance of government actors in the diffusion of SSI at both the national and regional levels, while most private sector and NGO actors remain in the periphery. Participants in both workshops highlighted the need for increased financing services to support the adoption of SSI and measures aimed at increasing the supply of high-quality irrigation equipment, such as modern water lifting technologies. One notable difference between the national and regional results was that at the regional level, farmers, and to some extent traders and input suppliers, were considered to be more influential in the diffusion of irrigation technologies, while they were considered marginal actors at the national level.
    Keywords: Irrigation; Small scale systems; Technology; Stakeholders; Participatory approaches; Institutions; Government agencies; Private sector; Nongovernmental organizations; Donors; International organizations; Funding; Smallholders; Farmers; Financing; Policies
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h050169&r=
  21. By: Kovacs, Kent; Rider, Shelby
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Econometrics/Stats
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312626&r=
  22. By: RICOME Aymeric (European Commission - JRC); ELOUHICHI Kamel; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: This report presents the results of an impact analysis of several reform options of the agricultural produce cess in Tanzania. The produce cess is a levy charged by Local Governments Authorities (LGAs) on the value of the marketed agricultural production. This analysis is achieved using a micro-economic model applied to a representative sample of 3134 farm-households spread out over all the country coming from the World Bank-LSMS-ISA surveys. The potential effects of the simulated reform options on land use, production, input use, farm income, LGAs revenues and some food security related indicators are presented and discussed.
    Keywords: Agriculture - Policy assessment - Tanzania
    Date: 2020–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc116791&r=
  23. By: Davis, George C.; Gupta, Anubhab
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312740&r=
  24. By: Arnold, Chelsea; Taylor, Mykel R.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312753&r=
  25. By: Tregeagle, Daniel; Plakias, Zoë
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312714&r=
  26. By: Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhan
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312787&r=
  27. By: BARATHOVA Katarina; CACCHIARELLI Luca; DI FONZO Antonella; LAI Mara; LEE Hyejin; MENAPACE Luisa; POKRIVCAK Jan; RAHBAUER Sebastian; RAJCANIOVA Miroslava; RUSSO Carlo; SORRENTINO Alessandro; SWINNEN Johann; VANDERVELDE Senne
    Abstract: This report presents the results of the research project “Pass-Through of Unfair Trading Practices in EU Food Supply Chains: Methodology and Empirical Application”. The purpose of the project is to design and test a monitoring system of unfair trading practices (UTP) along the agri-food supply chain. The investigation has special focus on assessment of the “pass-through effect”, defined as the consequences for the entire supply chain of UTPs adopted in a specific transaction. The report includes: (i) a review of the economic literature for a better understanding of the economic principles of UTPs; (ii) a review of available data sources and past experiences in UTP monitoring; (iii) the illustration of two alternative approaches for UTP monitoring: B-SEA (broad-scope empirical analysis) and IDEA (in-depth analysis); (iv) a test application of the two approaches to the EU fresh fruit sector; (v) a comparative analysis of the IDEA and B-SEA results and (vi) a discussion of the implications of our research.
    Keywords: Unfair Trading Practices, Food Chain, pass-through effect, fresh fruits, EU
    Date: 2020–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc120994&r=
  28. By: Ha, Sang Su; Min, Doohong; Dahlke, Garland
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312869&r=
  29. By: Ghorbani, Khashayar; Atallah, Shadi S.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312827&r=
  30. By: Santillan, Pamela S.; Sandoval M, Luis A.
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312661&r=
  31. By: Poghosyan, Armine; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312904&r=
  32. By: FEYEN Luc (European Commission - JRC); CISCAR MARTINEZ Juan Carlos (European Commission - JRC); GOSLING Simon; IBARRETA RUIZ Dolores; SORIA RAMIREZ Antonio; DOSIO Alessandro; NAUMANN Gustavo; RUSSO Simone; FORMETTA Giuseppe; FORZIERI Giovanni; GIRARDELLO Marco; SPINONI Jonathan; MENTASCHI Lorenzo; BISSELINK Bernard; BERNHARD Jeroen; GELATI Emiliano; ADAMOVIC Marko; GUENTHER Susann; DE ROO Arie; CAMMALLERI Carmelo; DOTTORI Francesco; BIANCHI Alessandra; ALFIERI Lorenzo; VOUSDOUKAS Michail; MONGELLI Ignazio; HINKEL Jochen; WARD P.j.; GOMES DA COSTA Hugo; DE RIGO Daniele; LIBERTA' Giorgio; DURRANT Tracy; SAN-MIGUEL-AYANZ Jesus; BARREDO CANO Jose Ignacio; MAURI Achille; CAUDULLO Giovanni; CECCHERINI Guido; BECK Pieter; CESCATTI Alessandro; HRISTOV Jordan; TORETI Andrea; PEREZ DOMINGUEZ Ignacio; DENTENER Franciscus; FELLMANN Thomas; ELLEBY Christian; CEGLAR Andrej; FUMAGALLI Davide; NIEMEYER Stefan; CERRANI Iacopo; PANARELLO Lorenzo; BRATU Marian; DESPRÉS Jacques; SZEWCZYK Wojciech; MATEI Nicoleta-Anca; MULHOLLAND Eamonn; OLARIAGA-GUARDIOLA Miguel
    Abstract: The JRC PESETA IV study shows that ecosystems, people and economies in the EU will face major impacts from climate change if we do not urgently mitigate greenhouse gas emissions or adapt to climate change. The burden of climate change shows a clear north-south divide, with southern regions in Europe much more impacted, through the effects of extreme heat, water scarcity, drought, forest fires and agriculture losses. Limiting global warming to well below 2°C would considerably reduce climate change impacts in Europe. Adaptation to climate change would further minimize unavoidable impacts in a cost-effective manner, with considerable co-benefits from nature-based solutions.
    Keywords: climate impacts, adaptation
    Date: 2020–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc119178&r=
  33. By: Schneider, Kate R.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, International Development, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312917&r=
  34. By: Hamilton, Stephen F.; Lowrey, John; Richards, Timothy J.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312679&r=
  35. By: Young, Alicia M.; Riley, John M.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312826&r=
  36. By: Liang, Chyi-Lyi; Tarpeh, Grace
    Keywords: Marketing, Production Economics, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312739&r=
  37. By: Balana, B.; Mekonnen, D.; Haile, B.; Hagos, Fitsum (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Yimam, S.; Ringler, C.
    Abstract: Credit constraint is considered by many as one of the key barriers to adoption of modern agricultural technologies, such as chemical fertilizer, improved seeds, and irrigation technologies, among smallholders. Past research and much policy discourse associates agricultural credit constraints with supply-side factors, such as limited access to credit sources or high costs of borrowing. However, demand-side factors, such as risk-aversion and financial illiteracy among borrowers, as well as high transaction costs, can also play important roles in credit-rationing for smallholders. Using primary survey data from Ethiopia and Tanzania, this study examines the nature of credit constraints facing smallholders and the factors that affect credit constraints. In addition, we assess whether credit constraints are gender-differentiated. Results show that demand-side credit constraints are at least as important as supply-side factors in both countries. Women are more likely to be credit constrained (from both the supply and demand sides) than men. Based on these findings, we suggest that policies should focus on addressing both supply- and demand-side credit constraints, including through targeted interventions to reduce risk, such as crop insurance and gender-sensitive policies to improve women’s access to credit.
    Keywords: Agricultural credit; Loans; Smallholders; Farmers; Supply balance; Constraints; Households; Gender; Women; Socioeconomic environment; Technology transfer; Adoption; Microfinance; Financial institutions; Risk factors; Policies; Small scale systems; Irrigation; Econometric models
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h050170&r=
  38. By: Hayes, Taylor E.; Robinson, Chadelle R.H.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness, Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312831&r=
  39. By: Spalding, Ashley; Kiesel, Kristin
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312924&r=
  40. By: Antonio Bodini (University of Parma); Sara Chiussi (University of Parma); Michele Donati (University of Parma); Valentin Bellassen (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Áron Török (Corvinus University of Budapest); Liesbeth Dries (WUR - Wageningen University and Research Centre); Dubravka Ćorić (Faculty of Economics [Zagreb] - University of Zagreb); Lisa Gauvrit (Ecozept - Partenaires INRAE); Efthimia Tsakiridou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Edward Majewski (SGGW - Warsaw University of Life Sciences); Bojan Ristic (Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia); Zaklina Stojanovic (Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia); Jose Maria Gil Roig (CREDA - Centre for Agro-Food Economy & Development, UPC-IRTA, Castelldefels, Spain - UPC - Université polytechnique de Catalogne); Apichaya Lilavanichakul (KU - Kasetsart University); Nguyễn Quỳnh An (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Filippo Arfini (University of Parma)
    Abstract: Abstract Water Footprint (WF, henceforth) is an indicator of water consumption and has taken ground to assess the impact of agricultural production processes over freshwater. The focus of this study was contrasting non-conventional, certified products with identical products obtained through conventional production schemes (REF, henceforth) using WF as a measure of their pressure on water resources. The aim was to the show whether products that are certified as Food Quality Schemes (FQS, henceforth) could also incorporate the lower impact on water among their quality features. To perform this comparison, we analysed 23 products selected among Organic, PDO and PGI as FQS, and their conventional counterparts. By restricting the domain of analysis to the on-farm phase of the production chain, we obtained that that no significant differences emerged between the FQS and REF products. However, if the impact is measured per unit area rather than per unit product, FQS showed a significant reduction in water demand.
    Keywords: agricultural production,crop water requirement,evapotranspiration,irrigation,yield,water footprint
    Date: 2021–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03267194&r=
  41. By: Jörgensen, Christian (AgriFood economics centre)
    Abstract: This paper adds to the scarce literature on the empirical economic evaluation of the costs and the effect from stimulating environmentally friendly production by public procurement. Green public procurement (GPP) is increasingly promoted as a policy tool to increase environmentally friendly production by both the European Commission and individual EU member states. Action has not at least been called for to increase the area of organically farmed land through the consumption of organic food. This study evaluates with detailed data the budgetary costs and potential limitations associated with stimulating an input in primary production with the consumption of final goods. By decomposing food consumption into different food categories, we found that both the cost and the effect from GPP critically depends on which food items procurers choose to buy. Additionally, we found that the prospect of stimulating organically farmed land by GPP inversely depends on yield growth as less farmland is needed to produce organic food as yields per hectare increase. Finally, our study illustrates that the leakage of funds from public procurement to domestic organic farmers hampers the cost effectiveness of GPP.
    Keywords: Public procurement; organic food; price transmission
    JEL: H57 Q02 Q11 Q58
    Date: 2021–05–31
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:luagri:2021_002&r=
  42. By: Ojha, Renu; Khanal, Aditya R.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312692&r=
  43. By: Lambert, Lixia H.; Hagerman, Amy D.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312891&r=
  44. By: Zapata, Samuel D.; García, José María
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Agricultural and Food Policy, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312672&r=
  45. By: Kurkalova, Lyubov A.; Hashemi Beni, Leila; Liang, Chyi-Lyi
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agribusiness, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312715&r=
  46. By: Haqiqi, Iman; Aqababaei, Monireh
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312777&r=
  47. By: Tolhurst, Tor N.; Gammans, Matthew
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Productivity Analysis, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312887&r=
  48. By: Sunghun Lim
    Abstract: Since the mid-1900s, agricultural global value chains (AGVCs) have grown rapidly and transformed the nature of agri-food production around the world. Little is known, however, about how participation in AGVCs changes the structure of participating economies. Using a constructed panel dataset from 155 countries for the period 1991-2015, I find that, in response to high AGVC participation, both GDP and employment shares in the agricultural and services sectors increase, and that both factors decrease in the manufacturing sector. Counter to conventional wisdom about structural transformation, I uncover evidence that modern agrarian economies are leapfrogging the manufacturing sector to directly develop their agriculture and services sectors through their participation in AGVCs.
    JEL: F14 F63 O13 Q17
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:29194&r=
  49. By: Kuethe, Todd H.; Bora, Siddhartha S.; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Marketing, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312646&r=
  50. By: He, Yurou; Tauer, Loren W.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Production Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312865&r=
  51. By: Liu, Weijun; Florkowski, Wojciech J.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312748&r=
  52. By: Harun Tanrivermis; Amani Uisso
    Abstract: Land resources which are exclusively saving the farming activities, remains inadequate in aspects of size, fertility and productivity rate while operations in farmlands are observed to be fragmented and scattered. The official data reveals that the average farmland size per households in 2016 was 7.0 parcel unit. It is observed that small-scale farm enterprises are widespread, and the average size of enterprises is insufficient and the distribution of lands between the regions and within the households is uneven. Due to increasing population pressure and inadequacy of non-agricultural employment opportunities, land fragmentation remains as a cumulative challenge to land management and administration. To eliminate this problem, legal arrangements have been made and land consolidation projects have been carried out. In the cause of preventing fragmentation to productive arable farmland due to inheritance and sales of agricultural lands to non-agricultural tenacities, the parliament has made some amendments to some of the sections in Soil Conservation and Land Use Law in 2014 concerning the compulsory farmland ownership and land transfer after inheritance and the prevention of land fragmentation which is frequently emerged due to land selling’s. Nevertheless, the Ministry responsible may only allow the transfer of land by considering certain criteria such as farm size, the sufficient level of revenue generated from the farmland, together with economic integrity of farmland. The aim of the research were to examine the legislations which were enacted to prevent the land fragmentation in agriculture in Turkey, legal lacunas and inadequacies observed in the cause of implementations, and the necessary measures to be taken to solve the problems were outlined. The research results aim at evaluating the causes of disputes over land transfer and to suggest proper solutions to resolve land ownership’s issues based on national survey results as secondary and primary data. Primary data were obtained through the survey and the findings reveal that the main deviations arise from the existing law both at national and in the case of Ankara province. On the other hand, the evaluations of research results were made based on the obtained data from national institutions, and the results of the interviews with the landowners and representative leaders alias “mukhtar”. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were applied in 95 sub-settlements of the district. Interviews were also conducted with a total number of 5 landowners and users in each village, including the neighbourhood representative leaders. Land resources, land distribution based on use types, land ownership, fragmentation and the trends of the enterprises were examined based on the analysis of data obtained from a total of 500 questionnaires. The impacts of legal regulation on land use and land fragmentation were examined and then a situation analysis was conducted in terms of farmland in Polatl district, one of the oldest human settlements in Anatolia. It is noteworthy that the change in land assets and use in the district is slow, but the practices of tenancy and sharecropping change yearly. It is obviously determined that newly legal provisions and regulations on land resources has a notably impact on the land tenure system, sustainability, land markets and land management strategies and land fragmentations in Turkey. In addition, these regulations have reduced the land mobility and transfer option in local markets and affect land rent and current capitalization rates.
    Keywords: farmland markets; fragmentation and farm size; heritage sales permit and landownership transfer; Productive farmland
    JEL: R3
    Date: 2021–01–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:arz:wpaper:eres2021_224&r=
  53. By: Soh, Moonwon; Wade, Tara
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312840&r=
  54. By: English, Leah A.; Popp, Jennie S.
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312622&r=
  55. By: Kim, Donghoon; Lopez, Rigoberto A.; Steinbach, Sandro
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312708&r=
  56. By: Ma, Wanglin; Zheng, Hongyun
    Keywords: Production Economics, Agricultural Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312632&r=
  57. By: Chen, Luoye; Khanna, Madhu
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312845&r=
  58. By: Bakhtavoryan, Rafael; Hovhannisyan, Vardges
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agricultural and Food Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312650&r=
  59. By: SOLANO HERMOSILLA Gloria (European Commission - JRC); ADEWOPO Julius; PETER Helen; BARREIRO HURLE Jesus (European Commission - JRC); ARBIA Giuseppe; NARDELLI Vincenzo; GORRIN GONZALEZ Celso (European Commission - JRC); MICALE Fabio (European Commission - JRC); CECCARELLI Tomaso
    Abstract: Timely and reliable monitoring of commodity food prices is an essential requirement for the assessment of market and food security risks and the establishment of early warning systems, especially in developing economies. However, data from regional or national systems for tracking changes of food prices in sub-Saharan Africa lacks the temporal or spatial richness and is often insufficient to inform targeted interventions. In addition to limited opportunity for [near-]real-time assessment of food prices, various stages in the commodity supply chain are mostly unrepresented, thereby limiting insights on stage-related price evolution. Yet, governments and market stakeholders rely on commodity price data to make decisions on appropriate interventions or commodity-focused investments. Recent rapid technological development indicates that digital devices and connectivity services are becoming affordable for many, including in remote areas of developing economies. This offers a great opportunity both for the harvesting of price data (via new data collection methodologies, such as crowdsourcing/crowdsensing — i.e. citizen-generated data — using mobile apps/devices), and for disseminating it (via web dashboards or other means) to provide real-time data that can support decisions at various levels and related policy-making processes. However, market information that aims at improving the functioning of markets and supply chains requires a continuous data flow as well as quality, accessibility and trust. More data does not necessarily translate into better information. Citizen-based data-generation systems are often confronted by challenges related to data quality and citizen participation, which may be further complicated by the volume of data generated compared to traditional approaches. Following the food price hikes during the first noughties of the 21st century, the European Commission's Directorate General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO) started collaborating with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) on innovative methodologies for real-time food price data collection and analysis in developing countries. The work carried out so far includes a pilot initiative to crowdsource data from selected markets across several African countries, two workshops (with relevant stakeholders and experts), and the development of a spatial statistical quality methodology to facilitate the best possible exploitation of geo-located data. Based on the latter, the JRC designed the Food Price Crowdsourcing Africa (FPCA) project and implemented it within two states in Northern Nigeria. The FPCA is a credible methodology, based on the voluntary provision of data by a crowd (people living in urban, suburban, and rural areas) using a mobile app, leveraging monetary and non-monetary incentives to enhance contribution, which makes it possible to collect, analyse and validate, and disseminate staple food price data in real time across market segments.
    Keywords: Food prices, market information, crowdsourcing, mobile app, digital platform, behavioural tools, citizens science
    Date: 2020–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc119273&r=
  60. By: Zilberman, David; Ahsanuzzaman, Ahsanuzzaman
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis, International Development, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312899&r=
  61. By: Morgan, Stephen N.; Farris, Jarrad G.
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, International Development, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312707&r=
  62. By: Kedar, Vishnu Shankarrao; Neharkar, Pratibha
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312772&r=
  63. By: Janzen, Joseph; Swearingen, Bryn; Yu, Jisang
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312762&r=
  64. By: Valentin Bellassen (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Marion Drut (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Federico Antonioli (University of Parma); Ružica Brečić (Faculty of Economics [Zagreb] - University of Zagreb); Michele Donati (University of Parma); Hugo Ferrer-Pérez (CREDA - Centre for Agro-Food Economy & Development, UPC-IRTA, Castelldefels, Spain - UPC - Université polytechnique de Catalogne); Lisa Gauvrit (Ecozept - Partenaires INRAE); Viet Hoang (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Kamilla Knutsen Steinnes (OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University); Apichaya Lilavanichakul (Kasetsart University - KU (THAILAND) - KU - Kasetsart University); Edward Majewski (Faculty of Biology [Warsaw] - UW - University of Warsaw); Agata Malak-Rawlikowska (Faculty of Biology [Warsaw] - UW - University of Warsaw); Konstadinos Mattas (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); An Nguyen (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Ioannis Papadopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Jack Peerlings (WUR - Wageningen University and Research Centre); Bojan Ristic (Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia); Marina Tomić Maksan (Faculty of Economics [Zagreb] - University of Zagreb); Áron Török (Corvinus University of Budapest); Gunnar Vittersø (SIFO - National Institute for Consumer Research - National Institute for ConsumerResearch); Abdoul Diallo (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Abstract The carbon and land footprint of 26 certified food products – geographical indications and organic products and their conventional references are assessed. This assessment goes beyond existing literature by (1) designing a calculation method fit for the comparison between certified food and conventional production, (2) using the same calculation method and parameters for 52 products – 26 Food Quality Schemes and their reference products – to allow for a meaningful comparison, (3) transparently documenting this calculation method and opening access to the detailed results and the underlying data, and (4) providing the first assessment of the carbon and land footprint of geographical indications. The method used is Life Cycle Assessment, largely relying on the Cool Farm Tool for the impact assessment. The most common indicator of climate impact, the carbon footprint expressed per ton of product, is not significantly different between certified foods and their reference products. The only exception to this pattern are vegetal organic products, whose carbon footprint is 16% lower. This is because the decrease in greenhouse gas emissions from the absence of mineral fertilizers is never fully offset by the associated lower yield. The climate impact of certified food per hectare is however 26% than their reference and their land footprint is logically 24% higher. Technical specifications directly or indirectly inducing a lower use of mineral fertilizers are a key driver of this pattern. So is yield, which depends both on terroir and farming practices. Overall, this assessment reinforces the quality policy of the European Union: promoting certified food is not inconsistent with mitigating climate change.
    Keywords: certified food,carbon footprint,land footprint,organic farming,geographical indications
    Date: 2021–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03265997&r=
  65. By: Haqiqi, Iman; Bahalou Horeh, Marziyeh
    Keywords: Production Economics, Health Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312776&r=
  66. By: Bird, Samuel; Verma, Sneha
    Keywords: International Development, Labor and Human Capital, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312717&r=
  67. By: Wang, Yangchuan; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312758&r=
  68. By: Hill, Alexandra E.; Sexton, Richard J.
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312771&r=
  69. By: Anderson, Andrew E.; Schroeder, Ted C.; Hefley, Trevor
    Keywords: Marketing, Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312906&r=
  70. By: Robinson, Chadelle R.H.; Wade, Brittany A.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agricultural Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312630&r=
  71. By: Nordin, Martin (AgriFood economics centre)
    Abstract: This study uses Swedish data to examine if the availability of nearby manure is an important determinant of organic uptake. We calculate farms’ N balance of manure (animals production of N relative to N use in crop and forage production) and use coordinates to aggregate neighbors’ N balances. In plain districts, we find that a standard deviation change in the within-1km N balance of manure increases the probability of being organic with 11%. A smaller impact is found for other districts and for the within-2-3km N balance of manure. Thus, our findings suggest that a further expansion of organic farming relies, partly, on an expansion of livestock production. Paradoxically, however, to alleviate the environmental impact of agriculture − the goal of organic production − livestock production is, preferably, reduced.
    Keywords: organic farming; manure; N availability; regional analysis
    JEL: N50
    Date: 2021–02–18
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:luagri:2021_001&r=
  72. By: John C. Beghin; Christopher R. Gustafson
    Abstract: We review the emerging international body of evidence on attitudes and willingness to pay (WTP) for novel foods produced with New Plant Engineering Techniques (NPETs). NPETs include genome/gene editing, cisgenesis, intragenesis, RNA interference and others. These novel foods are often beneficial for the environment and human health and more sustainable under increasingly prevalent climate extremes. These techniques can also improve animal welfare and disease resistance when applied to animals. Despite these promising attributes, evidence suggests that many, but not all consumers, discount these novel foods relative to conventional ones. Our systematic review sorts out findings to identify conditioning factors which can increase the acceptance of and WTP for these novel foods in a significant segment of consumers. International patterns of acceptance are identified. We also analyze how information and knowledge interact with consumer acceptance of these novel foods and technologies. Heterogeneity of consumers across cultures and borders, and in attitudes towards science and innovation emerges as key determinants of acceptance and WTP. Acceptance and WTP tend to increase when beneficial attributes-as opposed to producer-oriented cost-saving attributes-are generated by NPETs. NPETs improved foods are systematically less discounted than transgenic foods. Most of the valuation elicitations are based on hypothetical experiments and surveys and await validation through revealed preferences in actual purchases in food retailing environments.
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ias:cpaper:21-wp621&r=
  73. By: Pahmeyer, Christoph; Kuhn, Till; Britz, Wolfgang
    Abstract: In bio-economic farm models, crop choices are generally depicted as shares of land types which are aggregates of plots with similar characteristics. The ongoing process of digitalization allows access to highly detailed, spatially explicit farm data and facilitates to represent single plots instead. In our paper, we examine how different approaches to model crop choices influence the results of an arable farm in a bio-economic model. Three possible approaches are considered: ‘single plots’ with one crop per season, crop shares of land differentiated by soil type, called ‘categorized’, and crop shares on all arable land, termed ‘aggregate’. The analysis is conducted using a highly detailed, spatially explicit dataset of 8,509 arable farms located in the German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Our analysis indicates that the ‘aggregate’ and ‘categorized’ land endowment approaches produce similar simulation results, which however diverge from the ‘single plot’ approach. We find that on average, crop choices per farm differ by 11% between the spatially explicit ‘single plot’ and the ‘aggregate’ land endowment approach in our case study region. Total work requirements are found to be on average 10% higher in the ‘aggregate’ approach compared to the ‘single plot’ approach, while energy requirements are relatively similar (average difference of 2.2%). Among other factors, we find the difference to be highly correlated with the number of plots a farm is endowed with. For instance, the average difference in crop choices increases from the sample average of 11% to 20.8% for those farms that are endowed with less than 10 plots (~ 50% of the case study population). Differences in simulated farm profits when comparing the ‘aggregate’ land endowment approach to the ‘single plot’ approach are found to range between -306 €/ha to 434 €/ha (mean: 4.57 €/ha, median: - 9.93 €/ha, S.D.: 71.47 €/ha). Our results suggest that for bio-economic farm analyses focusing on aggregate results over a larger sample of farms, both the ‘aggregate’ and ‘categorized’ land endowment approaches are sufficiently accurate in case of similar average numbers of plots per farm as in our study. If single farm results or variability in the population are targeted, we propose to incorporate the ‘single plot’ approach in bio-economic farm analyses. The same holds for decision support systems focusing on individual farm responses to policy changes or technology adoption.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Land Economics/Use, Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08–26
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ubfred:313251&r=
  74. By: Kilders, Valerie; Caputo, Vincenzina
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312693&r=
  75. By: Choi, Yejun; Lambert, Dayton M.
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Marketing, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312807&r=
  76. By: Ogieriakhi, Macson; Woodward, Richard T.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312816&r=
  77. By: Beghin, John C.; Gustafson, Christopher R.
    Abstract: We review the emerging international body of evidence on attitudes and willingness to 10 pay (WTP) for novel foods produced with New Plant Engineering Techniques (NPETs). NPETs include genome/gene editing, cisgenesis, intragenesis, RNA interference and others. These novel foods are often beneficial for the environment and human health and more sustainable under increasingly prevalent climate extremes. These techniques can also improve animal welfare and disease resistance when applied to animals. Despite these promising attributes, evidence suggests that many, but not all consumers, discount these novel foods relative to conventional ones. Our systematic review sorts out findings to identify conditioning factors which can increase the acceptance of and WTP for these novel foods in a significant segment of consumers. International patterns of acceptance are identified. We also analyze how information and knowledge interact with consumer acceptance of these novel foods and technologies. Heterogeneity of consumers across cultures and borders, and in attitudes towards science and innovation emerges as key determinants of acceptance and WTP. Acceptance and WTP tend to increase when beneficial attributes—as opposed to producer-oriented cost-saving attributes—are generated by NPETs. NPETs improved foods are systematically less discounted than transgenic foods. Most of the valuation elicitations are based on hypothetical experiments and surveys and await validation through revealed preferences in actual purchases in food retailing environments.
    Date: 2021–08–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:isu:genstf:202108250700001133&r=
  78. By: Yim, Hyejin; Katare, Bhagyashree
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Consumer/Household Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312808&r=
  79. By: Morrissette, Kendra J.; Lusk, Jayson L.
    Keywords: Marketing, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312792&r=
  80. By: Nathan Delacrétaz; Bruno Lanz; Amir Delju; Etienne Piguet
    Abstract: Rural regions are more exposed to rainfall shocks, notably through agriculture, and understanding how local population adapt to changes in the climate is an important policy challenge. In this paper we exploit longitudinal data for Turkish provinces from 2008 to 2018 together with precipitation records over more than 30 years to study how shocks to 12-month standard precipitation index (SPI) affect out-migration across rural, transitional and urban regions, and we document how these impacts are channeled through local income, agricultural GDP, and conflicts. Based on fixed effect regressions controlling for unobserved heterogeneity across provinces and over time, we find evidence that negative SPI shocks are associated with higher out-migration in rural provinces. We also show that the relationship is fully mediated by per capita GDP, whereas agricultural GDP and conflicts do not play a role.
    Keywords: out-migration; climate change; rainfall; urbanization; per capita income; agriculture; conflicts
    JEL: F22 O15 R23 Q54
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:irn:wpaper:21-06&r=
  81. By: Xing, Mengying; Mao, Rui
    Keywords: International Development, International Relations/Trade, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312790&r=
  82. By: Smetana, Kerri; Melstrom, Richard; Malone, Trey
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Agribusiness, Marketing
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312890&r=
  83. By: Brenneis, Karina; Wollni, Meike
    Keywords: Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, International Development, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312691&r=
  84. By: Dong, Qi
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312627&r=
  85. By: Fatema, Naureen; Kibriya, Shahriar
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Agricultural and Food Policy, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312719&r=
  86. By: van Koppen, Barbara (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Magombeyi, Manuel S. (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Jacobs-Mata, Inga (International Water Management Institute (IWMI)); Molose, V.; Phasha, K.; Bophela, T.; Modiba, I.; White, M.
    Abstract: The African Water Facility, together with the Water Research Commission, South Africa, as its implementing agent, supported the demonstration project Operationalizing community-led Multiple Use water Services (MUS) in South Africa. As knowledge broker and research partner in this project, the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) analyzed processes and impacts at the local level, where the nongovernmental organization Tsogang Water and Sanitation demonstrated community-led MUS in six diverse rural communities in two of the poorest districts of South Africa, Sekhukhune and Vhembe districts - Ga Mokgotho, Ga Moela and Phiring in the Sekhukhune District Municipality, and Tshakhuma, Khalavha and Ha Gumbu in Vhembe District Municipality. In conventional water infrastructure projects, external state and non-state agencies plan, diagnose, design and prioritize solutions, mobilize funding, and implement the procurement of materials, recruitment of workers and construction. However, this MUS project facilitated decision-making by communities, and provided technical and institutional advice and capacity development. Based on IWMI’s evidence, tools and manuals, the project team organized learning alliances and policy dialogues from municipal to national level on the replication of community-led MUS by water services authorities; government departments of water, agriculture, and others; employment generation programs; climate and disaster management; and corporate social responsibility initiatives. This working paper reports on the local findings of Ga Mokgotho and Ga Moela villages, which had completed construction works. The paper presents an in-depth analysis from the preproject situation to each of the steps of the participatory process, and highlights the resulting benefits of more water, more reliable and sustainable supplies, and multiple benefits, including a 60% and 76% increase in the value of irrigated produce in Ga Mokgotho and Ga Moela, respectively. Women were the sole irrigation manager in 68% and 60% of the households in Ga Mokgotho and Ga Moela, respectively. The user satisfaction survey highlighted communities’ unanimous preference of the participatory process, capacity development and ownership compared to conventional approaches.
    Keywords: Multiple use water services; Community management; Water supply; Communal irrigation systems; Participatory approaches; Innovation; Access and benefit-sharing; Water availability; Water demand; Integrated management; Water resources; Water management; Water storage; Infrastructure; Pumps; Wells; Boreholes; Maintenance; Geohydrology; Groundwater; Water distribution; Water use; Domestic water; Livestock; Irrigated farming; Financing; Water users; Households; Livelihoods; Income; Women's participation; Capacity building; State intervention; Nongovernmental organizations; Rural areas; Villages
    Date: 2020
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:iwt:worppr:h050123&r=
  87. By: Beverly, Mariah; Neill, Clinton L.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312675&r=
  88. By: Wang, Yangchuan; Isengildina Massa, Olga; Stewart, Shamar
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312836&r=
  89. By: Akhundjanov, Sherzod B.; Jakus, Paul M.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312804&r=
  90. By: Britwum, Kofi; Demont, Matty
    Keywords: Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312673&r=
  91. By: Wang, Ying; Woodward, Richard T.; Liu, Jingyue
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312705&r=
  92. By: Choi, Jaerim; Lim, Sunghun
    Keywords: International Relations/Trade, Agricultural Policy, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312621&r=
  93. By: Donna, Javier D.; Espin-Sanchez, Jose-A.
    Abstract: We investigate the efficiency of a market relative to a non-market institution—an auction relative to a quota—as allocation mechanisms in the presence of frictions. We use data from water markets in southeastern Spain and explore a specific change in the institutions to allocate water. On the one hand, frictions arose because poor farmers were liquidity constrained. On the other hand, wealthy farmers who were part of the wealthy elite were not liquidity constrained. We estimate a structural dynamic demand model under the market by taking advantage that water demand for both types of farmers is determined by the technological constraint imposed by the crop’s production function. This approach allows us to differentiate liquidity constraints from unobserved heterogeneity. We use the estimated model to compute welfare under market and non-market institutions. We show that the institutional change from markets to quotas increased efficiency for the farmers considered.
    Keywords: Market Efficiency, Dynamic Demand, Auctions, Quotas, Vertical Integration, Financial Markets
    JEL: D02 G14 L11 L13 L42 L50 Q25
    Date: 2021–04–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pra:mprapa:109544&r=
  94. By: Sandoval M, Luis A.; Zapata, Samuel D.; Lemus, Juan Gerardo
    Keywords: Marketing, Agribusiness, Production Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312660&r=
  95. By: Lama-Mendoza, Ashley D.; Lillywhite, Jay M.
    Keywords: Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312830&r=
  96. By: Michele Donati (University of Parma); Adam Wilkinson (Impment); Mario Veneziani (University of Parma); Federico Antonioli (University of Parma); Filippo Arfini (University of Parma); Antonio Bodini (University of Parma); Virginie Amilien (Akershus University College); Peter Csillag (Corvinus University of Budapest - Corvinus University of Budapest); Hugo Ferrer-Pérez (CREDA - Centre for Agro-Food Economy & Development, UPC-IRTA, Castelldefels, Spain - UPC - Université polytechnique de Catalogne); Alexandros Gkatsikos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Lisa Gauvrit (Ecozept - Partenaires INRAE); Chema Gil (CREDA - Centre for Agro-Food Economy & Development, UPC-IRTA, Castelldefels, Spain - UPC - Université polytechnique de Catalogne); Việt Hoàng (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Kamilla Knutsen Steinnes (OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University); Apichaya Lilavanichakul (KU - Kasetsart University); Konstadinos Mattas (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Orachos Napasintuwong (KU - Kasetsart University); An Nguyễn (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Mai Nguyen (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Ioannis Papadopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Bojan Ristic (Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia); Zaklina Stojanovic (Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia); Marina Tomić Maksan (Faculty of Economics [Zagreb] - University of Zagreb); Áron Török (Corvinus University of Budapest); Efthimia Tsakiridou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Valentin Bellassen (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Abstract: Abstract We study the effect of a set of food quality scheme (FQS) products within the local economy using a local multiplier approach based on LM3 methodology. To evaluate the effective contribution within the local area, we compare each FQS product with its equivalent standard/conventional counterpart. Local multiplier allows us to track the financial flows converging within the local area at the different levels of the supply chain so that we can measure the FQS product role in local economic activation. Overall, the FQS products exhibit a higher positive contribution to the local economy than the standard references. However, there is significant heterogeneity in the impact according to the product categories. In the case of vegetal products, the local economic advantage due to FQS is 7% higher than the reference products, but the statistical tests reject the null hypothesis that the medians are significantly different from zero. On the contrary, animal products exhibit a larger contribution of FQS than the standard counterparts (+24%). The PGI products (+25%) produce the major effect, while PDO products show a median difference lower (+6%). The organic and non-organic products seem to be substantially equivalent in terms of contribution to the local economy, due to the similarity in the downstream processing phase.
    Keywords: Local multiplier,Food quality scheme,Economic spill-over,Local areas,Rural development
    Date: 2021–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03267437&r=
  97. By: Chen, Qihui; Pei, Chunchen
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312744&r=
  98. By: ShalekBriski, Abby; Devuyst, Eric A.; Brorsen, Wade
    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312857&r=
  99. By: Oyetunde-Usman, Zainab; Shee, Apurba
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics, Research Methods/Statistical Methods, International Development
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312821&r=
  100. By: Grigsby-Calage, Chuck; Mullally, Conner C.; Volpe, Richard J.
    Keywords: Marketing, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312902&r=
  101. By: Sarah Ottavi (EPSYLON - Dynamique des capacités humaines et des conduites de santé - UPVM - Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3); Sébastien Roussel (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - UMR 5211 - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement); Arielle Syssau (EPSYLON - Dynamique des capacités humaines et des conduites de santé - UPVM - Université Paul-Valéry - Montpellier 3)
    Abstract: In this paper,the authors provide a data report that describes an original dataset named French Affective Images of Climate Change (FAICC) database. The main objective is to provide tools for CC assessment. Images are rated by a sample of non-experts according to three variables: relevance to CC, arousal, and emotional valence. The database provides for each image an identification number, the mean rating and standard deviation of ratings for relevance, arousal and valence, respectively.
    Keywords: climate change,emotion,French version,image database,valence,arousal,relevance ratings
    Date: 2021–08–06
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03325423&r=
  102. By: Zilberman, David; Bansal, Sangeeta
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety, Health Economics and Policy, Research Methods/Statistical Methods
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312873&r=
  103. By: GARZON DELVAUX Pedro; RIESGO ALVAREZ Laura; GOMEZ Y PALOMA Sergio (European Commission - JRC)
    Abstract: The report assesses the relationship between land size and performance in the developing world. Farm and plot performance data were gathered through an exhaustive review of mostly peer-reviewed publications over the last 22 years (1997-2018) in English, French and Spanish. Following the screening of the material, a selection of 472 papers was reviewed, creating a pool of over 1100 individual observations or cases. Both specific and general agricultural economics studies using land area as explaining variable in their performance estimates were explored. Three groups of indicators (i.e. gross output, net value and efficiency) were analysed according to area size in an effort to capture global indicators of performance, beyond the too often used partial indicators (e.g. yield or gross value per area). Analyses based on farm data show that there has been a revival of interest on the question particularly on sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) agriculture, given the increased rate of specific literature publications. The review looked for evidence documenting the various possible relationships that could relate the size of an agricultural holding to its performance (i.e. direct, inverse and non-monotonic). The main explanations shaping the size-performance relationship were explored, namely: the contextual rural input market (i.e. labour, land, input, etc.) imperfections but also methodological shortcomings of the existing literature. On the one hand, inverse relationship (IR) is clearly the dominant type of interaction between cropped land area and agricultural performance using the most common performance indicator group used (gross output mainly populated by studies using yield or total value). However, the economic literature has clearly demonstrated that the use of this type of indicator of performance is generally ill-advised in assessing the farm size performance relationship. On the other hand, the less frequent but more global productivity indicator group of "efficiency" and "net values" do not report such a clear-cut relationship. As a matter of fact, cases using "efficiency" performance indicators are more likely to record a direct relationship than IR. Moreover, the emergence of non-monotonic relationships needs to be highlighted showing that the relationship may not be constant. Tests conducted on the existing material clearly associate a number of rural factor market imperfections with the prevalence of the IR. Hence, IR is more likely to be a symptom of imperfections and lack of opportunities for rural labour than an advantage of a given type of farms. In turn, methodological reasons explored also indicate that narrower ranges of farm size in a given study increase the reporting of IR, particularly in SSA and when analysing partial performance indicators. From being an established stylised “fact” in development economics, IR may not be taken for granted because of empirical complexities in accurately assessing it but also because there is evidence that such a relationship depends on the performance indicator analysed. Hence, IR may not necessarily be considered systematic, continuous, stable through time, irreversible or universal. From a broader development intervention perspective, and based on the review results, the recommended performance indicators (i.e. net value and efficiency) show that larger farms tend to be more performant than the smaller farms. However, this does not suggest the abandonment of smallholders by policy as there are both critical economic and social justifications for the direct improvement of the living conditions of a large share of the population in most of the developing world. It rather advocates a revisited and expanded development role for medium sized ones.
    Keywords: farm size-performance relationship, inverse relationship, developing countries, Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle-east and North Africa
    Date: 2020–12
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc120526&r=
  104. By: Liang Lu; Ruby Nguyen; Md Mamunur Rahman; Jason Winfree
    Abstract: The food supply chain has experienced major disruptions from both demand and supply sides during the Covid-19 pandemic. While some consequences such as food waste are directly caused by the disruption due to supply chain inefficiency, others are indirectly caused by a change in consumer’s preferences. As a result, evaluating food supply chain resilience is a difficult task. With an attempt to understand impacts of demand on the food supply chain, we developed an agent-based model based on the case of Idaho’s potato supply chain. Results showed that not only the magnitude but also the timing of the demand shock will have different impacts on various stakeholders of the supply chain. Our contribution to the literature is two-fold. First, the model helps explain why food waste and shortages may occur with dramatic shifts in consumer demand. Second, this paper provides a new angle on evaluating the various mitigation strategies and policy responses to disruptions beyond Covid-19.
    JEL: L1 Q11
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:29166&r=
  105. By: Kim, Kevin N.; Katchova, Ani
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Agribusiness, Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312749&r=
  106. By: Liu, Bingcai; Sohngen, Brent; Baker, Justin S.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource/Energy Economics and Policy, Agribusiness
    Date: 2021–08
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea21:312846&r=
  107. By: Ferrara, Laurent; Karadimitropoulou, Aikaterini; Triantafyllou, Athanasios
    Abstract: Global economic activity is surrounded by increasing uncertainties from various sources. In this paper, we focus on commodity prices and estimate a global commodity uncer- tainty factor by capturing comovement in volatilities of major agricultural, metals and energy commodity markets through a group-specific Dynamic Factor Model. Then, by computing impulse response functions estimated using a Structural VAR model, we find that an increase in the common commodity price uncertainty results in a substantial and persistent drop in investment and trade for a set of emerging and advanced economies. We show that a global commodity uncertainty shock is more detrimental for economic growth than usual financial and economic policy uncertainty shocks. Last, our method- ology turns out to be a way to disentangle the macroeconomic effects of "good" and "bad" oil uncertainty: when an oil uncertainty shock is common to all commodities, then the macroeconomic effect is likely to be negative, but when this shock is specific to the oil market, the effect tends to be positive in the short run.
    Keywords: Commodity uncertainty, Factor model, Investment, Trade flows
    Date: 2021–08–23
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:esy:uefcwp:30945&r=
  108. By: Sylvette Monier-Dilhan (US ODR - Observatoire des Programmes Communautaires de Développement Rural - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique); Thomas Poméon (US ODR - Observatoire des Programmes Communautaires de Développement Rural - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique); Michael Böhm (ECOZEPT, Freising, Germany); Ruzica Brečić (University of Zagreb); Peter Csillag (ECO-SENSUS Research and Communication Non-profit Ltd., 7100 Szekszárd, Hungary); Michele Donati (University of Parma); Hugo Ferrer-Pérez (Center for Agro-Food Economics and Development - UPC - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya [Barcelona] - IRTA - Institute for Agrifood Research and Technology); Lisa Gauvrit (Ecozept - Partenaires INRAE); José M. Gil (CREDA - CREDA - Centre de Recerca en Economia i Desenvolupament Agroalimentaris); Việt Hoàng (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Apichaya Lilavanichakul (Agro-Industrial Technology, Faculty of Agro-Industry - KU - Kasetsart University); Edward Majewski (Institute of Economics and Finance, Warsaw University of Life Sciences—SGGW, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland); Agata Malak-Rawlikowska (Department of Economics and Organisation of Entreprises, Institute of Economics and Finance - SGGW - Warsaw University of Life Sciences); Konstadinos Mattas (Department of Agricultural Economics, School of Agriculture - Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Orachos Napasintuwong (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Faculty of Economics - KU - Kasetsart University); an Quỳnh Nguyễn (School of Economics, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Vietnam); Kallirroi Nikolaou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Ioannis Papadopoulos (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki); Stefano Pascucci (University of Exeter); Jack Peerlings (WUR - Wageningen University and Research Centre); Bojan Ristic (Faculty of Economics - University of Belgrade [Belgrade]); Kamilla Steinnes (SIFO - National Institute for Consumer Research - National Institute for ConsumerResearch); Zaklina Stojanovic (University of Belgrade); Marina Tomić Maksan (University of Zagreb); Áron Török (Department of Agricultural Economics - Corvinus University of Budapest); Mario Veneziani (University of Parma); Gunnar Vittersø (SIFO - National Institute for Consumer Research - National Institute for ConsumerResearch); Valentin Bellassen (CESAER - Centre d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales Appliquées à l'Agriculture et aux Espaces Ruraux - AgroSup Dijon - Institut National Supérieur des Sciences Agronomiques, de l'Alimentation et de l'Environnement - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)
    Date: 2020–12–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03102266&r=

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