nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2019‒07‒29
35 papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. Coordination: the key to governing the water-land-food nexus in Zambia? By Scheumann, Waltina; Phiri, George
  2. Does Agricultural Value Added Induce Environmental Degradation? Empirical Evidence from an Agrarian Country By Mary O. Agboola; Festus V. Bekun
  3. Can the Japanese Agri-food Sectors Survive by Promotingtheir Exports?:A General Equilibrium Analysis with Farm Heterogeneity and Product Differentiation By Nobuhiro Hosoe; Yuko Akune
  4. Unit Costs and income from selected products in 2017 – research results in the AGROKOSZTY System By Skarżyńska, Aldona
  5. A Cross Sectional Analysis of Farm-Size Productivity Relationship in African Agriculture Evidence from Maize Farming Households in Nigeria By Ogunleye, A.S.; Akinola, A.A.; Bamire, A.S.; Alia, D.; Adeyeye, O.; Abdoulaye, T.; Reed, H.
  6. The influence of Brazilian exports on price transmission processes in the coffee sector: A Markov-switching approach By Vollmer, Teresa; von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan
  7. Pro-poor climate risk insurance: the role of community-based organisations (CBOs) By Matias, Denise Margaret; Fernández, Raúl; Hutfils, Marie-Lena; Winges, Maik
  8. Farmers Willingness to Pay for Smallholder Water Lifting Technologies: Evidence from Ethiopia By Tesfaye, Meneyahel Z.; Bizimana, Jean Claude; Daba, Teferi; Balana, Bedru; Gebregziabher, Gebrehaweria
  9. What are the impacts of devolution on agricultural civil servants and services in Ghana? By Resnick, Danielle
  10. Food Fraud and Import Refusals: Assessing China’s Agri-Food Imports at the Firm Level By Xie, Chaoping; Wang, Xiaojuan; Grant, Jason; Long, Yanyu; Liu, Yifang
  11. Agricultural Growth and its Spillover Effects on Agricultural and Rural Transformation: An Analysis of Zambian Household Survey Data By Snyder, Jason E.; Jayne, Thomas S.; Mason, Nicole M.; Samboko, Paul C.
  12. Economic Impacts of Cloud Seeding on Agricultural Crops in North Dakota By Bangsund, Dean; Hodur, Nancy
  13. Public agricultural spending and growth in Ghana: Spending more, smarter By Aragie, Emerta; Artavia, Marco; Pauw, Karl
  14. Effects of smoking on agricultural productivity By Haque, Samiul; Abedin, Naveen; Fakir, Adnan M. S.; Hannan, Rafe; Alam, Rafa
  15. Does Virtual Reality Reduce Hypothetical Bias? Evidence from Choice Experiments Using Nutrition Labels By Fang, Di; Nayga, Rodolfo M.; West, Grant H.; Bazzani, Claudia
  16. Training Needs for Small Producers to Minimize Agricultural Marketing Problems and Challenges: How Cooperative Extension Can Fill the Gap By Karki, Lila B.; Karki, Uma; Tackie, David Nii O.; Harris, Gwendolyn
  17. Internalization of the butter market By Baran, Joanna
  18. The local institutions and transaction costs of public aid in the process of agriculture modernisation By Kusz, Dariusz Andrzej
  19. Electronic wallet technology and the enabling environment of smallholder farmers in Nigeria By Joseph I. Uduji; Elda N. Okolo-Obasi; Simplice A. Asongu
  20. Is water pricing an efficient instrument to ration Brazilian agricultural water consumption? By Bartholomeu, Daniela B.; Alves, Paulo Nocera; Caixeta-Filho, José V.; Cruz, José C.
  21. Technical efficiency of family dairy farms: the experience of a climate resilience program in Brazil By Gori Maia, Alexandre; Fonseca, Camila Veneo Campos; Silveira, Rodrigo Lanna F.; Burney, Jennifer; Cesano, Daniele
  22. The effect of supply chain integration and environmental proactivity on environmental performance. The case of the horticultural spanish sector By Jorge Tarifa Fernández; Jerónimo de Burgos Jiménez; José Joaquín Céspedes Lorente
  23. Estimating the adaptive benefits of water market reform for Californian irrigated agriculture By Arellano Gonzalez, Jesus; Moore, Frances; AghaKouchak, Amir; Qin, Yue; Davis, Steven; Burney, Jennifer; Levy, Morgan
  24. Do the Poor Pay More for Food? Evidence from Tanzania By Sauer, Christine M.; Reardon, Thomas A.; Tschirley, David L.; Waized, Betty; Alphonce, Roselyne; Ndyetabula, Daniel
  25. Modeling Location Decisions of Food and Agricultural Industry Establishments with Microdata By Van Sandt, Anders T.; Carpenter, Craig W.; Loveridge, Scott; Dudensing, Rebekka M.; Niehm, Linda; McKinney, Steven
  26. Farmers’ willingness to adopt chemical-free inputs and engage in collaborative arrangements: A discrete choice experiment in Mexico By Colin Castillo, Sergio; Martinez-Cruz, Adan L.; Manríquez García, Naim; Vázquez-Pérez, Joel T.
  27. Constructing Rigorous Relative Price Indices of Agricultural Land in the Developed and Developing World By Nehring, Richard F.; Zhang, Wendong; Ghosh, Nilabja; Liebman, Matt; Sheng, Yu
  28. Improving the quality of life of smallholder farmers by a climate resilience program in Brazil By Gori Maia, Alexandre; Morales Martinez, Daniel; Burney, Jennifer; Cesano, Daniele
  29. Optimal local foods procurement in the National School Lunch Program: an analysis of potential impacts of Farm to School policies on procurement practices. By Long, Abby; Jablonski, Becca B. R.; Costanigro, Marco; Frasier, W. Marshall
  30. Estimating Food Prices for NHANES and the USDA Food Plans By Carlson, Andrea C.; Kuczynski, Kevin; Pannucci, TusaRebecca; Koegel, Kristin; Page, Elina T.; Tornow, Carina; Zimmerman, Thea Pamer
  31. The “new location theory” applied to production agriculture: A multivariate approach By Gottlieb, Paul D.; Dobis, Elizabeth A.; Hira, Anil; Reid, Neil; Goetz, Stephan J.
  32. A Multi-Country Study of the Willingness-to-Consume Alternative (RNAi, CRISPR and Cisgenic) Genetically Modified Food. By Narh, Alfred B.; Nalley, Lawton L.; Price, Heather; Shew, Aaron M.; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
  33. Market and Production Heterogeneity Drives Differential Economic Benefits of Virus Screening Across California Grape Industry By Fenton, Marieke; Lybbert, Travis J.; Cheon, Ji Yeon; Gjerdseth, Emma; Wang, Qian
  34. The Impacts of A Severe Natural Disaster on the Agricultural Sector: A Case Study of the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake By Tsai, Ming-Jou; Yu, Tun-Hsiang; Boyer, Christopher M.; Chen, Rachel JC
  35. Return Migration, Farm Household Differentiation and Farm Size in Rural China: Evidence from a Cross-Sectional Survey By Hu, Ruifa; Chen, Qianqian; Sun, Yiduo; Zhang, Chao

  1. By: Scheumann, Waltina; Phiri, George
    Abstract: Water- and land-related resource conflicts are the starting point of the Zambian nexus study. Zambia is endowed with abundant land and water resources, the utilisation of which offers huge potential for the country’s economic development. For this reason, the Zambian Government has planned the gradual expansion of irrigated areas throughout the country to boost agricultural production and productivity to meet domestic food demands, to supply regional and international markets, and to create income and employment for smallholders and the rural population. However, changing land use from rain-fed to irrigation on a large scale fuels competition among water users. But conflicts are not only about water: The expansion takes place in areas under customary land tenure, generating conflicts between commercial investors and pre-existing smallholders, and between local people and the chiefs administering the land. In order to realise the government’s vision of sustainable development in all its dimensions (economic, social and environmental), good governance and effective coordination is required. Coordination, which carries the positive connotation of “good governance”, seems to be the way out of silo planning and uncoordinated implementation. But coordination is not automatically forthcoming, nor is it easy to initiate and sustain. The study analyses the modes at hand to coordinate activities of more or less independent public-sector units related to agricultural development activities, the kind of coordination problems and the barriers and hindrances to effective coordination. The focus of the study is the planning and licensing process of large-scale public-private agricultural investment projects with water/irrigation infrastructure as major components. The Zambia study argues that cross-sectoral coordination is not the only governance issue to be solved to minimise resource-related conflicts and their environmental and social impacts. The study shows that governing the water-land-food nexus is not only a cross-sectoral coordination issue (horizontal coordination) but also an issue of effective vertical coordination. This is most evident regarding land issues. This governance issue originates from the plurality and concurrency of traditional and modern land-tenure systems. Effective implementation of the Zambian government’s policy and strategy is also as much an issue of assigning distinct functions to public sectors units and equipping them with sufficient resources for implementation; of upgrading public units to fully fledged administrative units and of considering viable financial models for the water authority WARMA. We applied the Network of Adjacent Action Situations (NAAP) concept that allows one to analyse complex policy settings and to specifically take account of the many decision-making public units that steer the Zambian water-land based agricultural development strategy.
    Keywords: Agenda 2030,Governance
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:diedps:202018&r=all
  2. By: Mary O. Agboola (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia); Festus V. Bekun (Eastern Mediterranean University, Turkey)
    Abstract: This study empirically investigates the agriculture-induced environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis in an agrarian framework. Annual time series data from 1981–2014 was employed using Augmented Dickey–Fuller and the Phillips–Perron (PP) unit root test complemented by the Zivot and Andrews unit root test that accounts for a single structural break to ascertain stationarity properties of variables under consideration. For the cointegration analysis, an autoregressive distributive lag methodology and the recent novel Bayer and Hanck combined cointegration technique is employed. For the direction of causality, the Granger causality test is used as estimation technique. Empirical findings lend support for the long-run equilibrium relationship among the variables under consideration. This study also validates the inverted U-shaped pattern of EKC for the case of Nigeria, affirming that Nigeria remains at the scale-effect stage of its growth trajectory. Further empirical results show that foreign direct investment attraction helps mitigate carbon emissions in Nigeria. Based on these results, several policy prescriptions on the Nigerian energy mix and agricultural operations in response to quality of the environment were suggested for policymakers, stakeholders, and environmental economists that formulate and design environmental regulations and strategies to realise the Goal 7 of sustainable development goals (SDGs).
    Keywords: Agriculture ecosystem, Energy consumption, Granger Causality, EKC, Nigeria
    JEL: C32 Q1 Q4 Q5
    Date: 2019–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:agd:wpaper:19/040&r=all
  3. By: Nobuhiro Hosoe (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan); Yuko Akune (Nihon University)
    Abstract: Manufacturingindustries have attracted research attention regarding roles of firm heterogeneityand product differentiation in the new new trade theory. Agricultural sectors also produce new goods by product differentiationthrough breeding, food processing, quality-upgrading, and branding.In reaction to the recent globalization, the Japanese government has sought strategiesto promote its domestic agri-food sectors by means of product differentiation and export promotion. This computable general equilibrium study examinesthe relevance of thesepoliciesby simulating hypothetical trade liberalizationin agriculture and/or food. We show that agricultural trade liberalization would not increase Japans agricultural exports but would increase food exports; and that food trade liberalization would promote food exports. Both types of liberalization would increase domestic production in agri-food sectors through agri-food linkages and variety effects. This finding affords evidence of the relevance of product differentiation strategy through food processing and exportation,but not of agricultural export promotion strategy.
    Date: 2019–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ngi:dpaper:19-06&r=all
  4. By: Skarżyńska, Aldona
    Abstract: The main objective of the research was to present in 2017 the production and economic results of sweet lupine, fodder pea, field beans, soybean, cow's milk and beef cattle depending on the scale of their production. Research was held at commercial farms, which sell their production. These farms are enterprises. These farms were deliberately selected from a representative farm sample that was in the field of observation of the Polish FADN system. Data describing the researched agricultural products were collected in the AGROKOSZTY system, and then supplemented with data from the Polish FADN database. The results of products were influenced by production capacity of farms, i.e. resources of land, labour and capital, their quality and the manner of use, but they were also dependent on external conditions (e.g. market, weather). These impacts resulted in varying degrees of changes in the volume of production, unit costs and price of products. In 2017, the income from the surveyed agricultural products was within fairly wide limits. The positive impact of the size of the production scale was visible, although it appeared at various levels of analysis. Studies have shown that income without subsidies has ensured all plant products and milk production. On the other hand, the production of beef cattle on average in the research sample and on average in the separated ranges of the production scale was unprofitable. However, in each group there were farms in which the beef cattle production was profitable. It was mainly due to lower production costs.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Production Economics
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:291532&r=all
  5. By: Ogunleye, A.S.; Akinola, A.A.; Bamire, A.S.; Alia, D.; Adeyeye, O.; Abdoulaye, T.; Reed, H.
    Abstract: This paper examines the farm size and productivity relationship using data from Nigeria. The household data used has been drawn from a baseline survey conducted in Nigeria and financed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundations (BMGF).The relationship between farm size and productivity has long been a topic of debate in development economics. Using a cross sectional baseline data, we aimed at examining the relationship between maize yield and farm size across the selected agro-ecological zones. Specifically, it aimed at investigating the farm size–productivity relationship and its underlying determinants for maize producers in Nigeria. Findings from this study indicate that productivity measures are consistently highest among farms small farms, next highest among medium, and lowest among large farms. Gross profit per hectare and net profit per hectare on small farms are over 15% higher and 40% respectively higher than medium and large farms. The study further reveal a strong negative relationship between the value of output per hectare and own cultivated area with a doubling in cultivated area associated with a 35% or 98% decrease in the value of crop output per unit of cultivated land at the holding- or plot-level, respectively. We therefore recommended that farm size– productivity relationship and its determinants in developing countries like Nigeria should continue to be of interest to policy makers seeking to resolve the small-sized farm issue.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2019–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291798&r=all
  6. By: Vollmer, Teresa; von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan
    Abstract: Most analysis of agricultural commodity market integration is solely based on price information. However, adding trade data can improve the understanding of interactions between interrelated markets. We link the analysis of price transmission processes between spot and futures markets with trade information to study the influence of Brazilian coffee exports on global price interdependencies. Using a Markov-switching vector error correction model (MSVECM) we allow for structural changes over time. Our results reveal two regimes. One regime is characterized by periods of sideways or downward trending coffee prices with low price volatility, and the other one by phases of price spikes and high price volatility. Price information is transmitted through both the spot and the futures prices and the speed of the price transmission process is significantly affected by the total daily volume and value of Brazilian coffee exports.
    Keywords: price transmission,Markov-switching models,coffee,customs data,spot and futures markets
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:daredp:1904&r=all
  7. By: Matias, Denise Margaret; Fernández, Raúl; Hutfils, Marie-Lena; Winges, Maik
    Abstract: In the face of increasingly frequent extreme weather events, the need to manage climate risk becomes more urgent, especially for the most vulnerable countries and communities. With the aim of reducing vulnerability, climate risk transfer in the form of climate risk insurance (CRI) has been gaining attention in climate policy discussions. When properly designed, CRI acts as a safety net against climate change impacts by providing financial support after an extreme weather event. Two main types of insurance enable payouts: indemnity (traditional) insurance or predefined parameters (index-based) insurance. Individuals, groups, or even governments may take out policies with either type of insurance and receive payouts directly (insurer to beneficiary payout) or indirectly (insurer to aggregator to beneficiary payout). Direct insurance is usually implemented at the micro-level with individual policyholders. Indirect insurance is usually implemented through group contracts at the meso-level through risk aggregators and at the macro-level through the state. While promising, risk transfer in the form of CRI also has its share of challenges. Within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the lack of accessibility and afford¬ability of CRI for poor and vulnerable groups have been identified as barriers to uptake. In light of climate justice, asking the poor and climate-vulnerable groups - most of whom do not contribute substantially to anthropogenic climate change - to solely carry the financial burden of risk transfer is anything but just. Employing a human rights-based approach to CRI may ensure that the resilience of poor and climate-vulnerable groups is enhanced in a climate-just manner. Indigenous peoples are some of the poorest and most climate vulnerable groups. Often marginalised, they rarely have access to social protection. The strong communal relationship of indigenous peoples facilitates their participation in community-based organisations (CBOs). CBOs are a suitable vehicle for meso-insurance, in which risk is aggregated and an insurance policy belongs to a group. In this way, CBOs can facilitate service provision that would otherwise be beyond the reach of individuals. Conclusions of this briefing paper draw on a conceptual analysis of meso-insurance and the results of field research conducted in March 2018 with indigenous Palaw’ans in the Philippines. We find that CRI needs to be attuned to the differential vulnerabilities and capacities of its beneficiaries. This is particularly true for poor and vulnerable people, for whom issues of accessibility and affordability need to be managed, and human rights and pro-poor approaches need to be ensured. In this context, meso-insurance is a promising approach when it provides accessibility and affordability and promotes a pro-poor and human rights-based approach of risk transfer by: Properly identifying and involving target beneficiaries and duty-bearers by employing pro-poor and human rights principles. Employing measures to improve the financial literacy of target beneficiaries. Designing insurance models from the bottom up.
    Keywords: Armut und Ungleichheit,Klimawandel
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:zbw:diebps:192018&r=all
  8. By: Tesfaye, Meneyahel Z.; Bizimana, Jean Claude; Daba, Teferi; Balana, Bedru; Gebregziabher, Gebrehaweria
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290730&r=all
  9. By: Resnick, Danielle
    Abstract: In 2009, Ghana passed Local Government Instrument 1961 (LI 1961) to devolve a set of functions from the central government to the country’s 216 Metropolitan, Municipal, and District Assemblies (MMDA). Agriculture, along with public works and social welfare, was among the first sectors to be devolved. This transfer was formally institutionalized in 2012. In addition, LI 1961 stipulated that the staff of the MMDA departments were to be transferred from the national civil service to a newly created Local Government Services (LGS). A composite budget system also was introduced, which integrated the budgets of all departments of the MMDAs into the overall budget for the MMDA.
    Keywords: GHANA; WEST AFRICA; AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA; AFRICA; agriculture; decentralization; devolution; local government; agricultural planning; agricultural policies; service delivery; civil servants
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gssppn:14&r=all
  10. By: Xie, Chaoping; Wang, Xiaojuan; Grant, Jason; Long, Yanyu; Liu, Yifang
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290882&r=all
  11. By: Snyder, Jason E.; Jayne, Thomas S.; Mason, Nicole M.; Samboko, Paul C.
    Keywords: International Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291049&r=all
  12. By: Bangsund, Dean; Hodur, Nancy
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Farm Management
    Date: 2019–07–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:nddaae:291806&r=all
  13. By: Aragie, Emerta; Artavia, Marco; Pauw, Karl
    Abstract: In 2014, African heads of state reaffirmed their commitment to the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Program (CAADP) through the adoption of the Malabo Declaration (AU 2014). The declaration included commitments to reduce hunger and poverty, boost intra-regional trade, enhance resilience to climate variability, and, in line with the Maputo Declaration a decade earlier, to continue allocating to agriculture at least 10 percent of government expenditure. Despite this long-standing spending commitment, Ghana’s agricultural budget share has remained well below 10 percent during the last decade. Depending on accounting principles followed, estimates range from 1 to 2 percent (CAGD 2016), 2 to 4 percent (FAO 2014) or 6 to 8 percent (MoFA 2017a). Given strong evidence that agricultural spending in developing countries yields significant returns (Mogues et al. 2015), Ghana’s relatively weak agricultural performance during the period from 2007 to 2017 may be linked to low levels of spending. At 4.3 percent per annum, agricultural GDP growth has only been half that realized in the non-agricultural sectors (MoF 2018). This weak agricultural growth has also not benefited the poor. Rural poverty has increased in recent years, especially in northern Ghana (GSS 2018). While budgetary allocations to agriculture matter, the quality of spending is as important (Akroyd and Smith 2007). In this regard, concerns have been raised about the decline in allocations to agricultural research, knowledge transfer, and infrastructure in favor of spending on routine operations (FAO 2014; World Bank 2017). Ideally, sector budgets should maintain a healthy balance between investments in a sector’s capacity to grow, e.g., infrastructure or farmers’ knowledge, and expenditures that are fully consumed in the same period, e.g., operational expenses or subsidies (Benin & Tiburcio 2018; Mogues et al. 2015). Following Ghana’s unfavorable assessment in the African Agricultural Transformation Scorecard (AATS), which was launched by the African Union (AU) in 2018, and in light of policy developments, budgetary trends, and socioeconomic outcomes, Ghana’s development partners called for an increase in funding allocated to the agriculture sector at the national Joint Sector Review for Agriculture in June 2019. They further called for improvements in the effectiveness of agricultural spending, with the distortionary effects of large-scale subsidy programs highlighted as a specific concern. A recent study led by IFPRI’s Ghana Strategy Support Program (GSSP) and FAO’s Monitoring and Analyzing Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP) project considers these issues further (Aragie et al. 2019). Specifically, using an economywide model of the Ghanaian economy, the research-ers examined how changes in the level and composition of public agricultural expenditure affect socioeconomic outcomes in the short and medium term in Ghana. This note highlights selected key study findings.
    Keywords: GHANA; WEST AFRICA; AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA; AFRICA; subsidies; public investment;agricultural extension;fertilizers;public agricultural investment;input subsidies;agricultural expenditure;Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model;fertilizer subsidies;agricultural spending
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:fpr:gssppn:15&r=all
  14. By: Haque, Samiul; Abedin, Naveen; Fakir, Adnan M. S.; Hannan, Rafe; Alam, Rafa
    Keywords: Production Economics
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291149&r=all
  15. By: Fang, Di; Nayga, Rodolfo M.; West, Grant H.; Bazzani, Claudia
    Keywords: Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290832&r=all
  16. By: Karki, Lila B.; Karki, Uma; Tackie, David Nii O.; Harris, Gwendolyn
    Keywords: Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291311&r=all
  17. By: Baran, Joanna
    Abstract: The aim of the paper was to define geographic scope of internationalization the butter market based on Elzinga–Hogarty method.. Using secondary data (Food and Agriculture Organization, Institute of Agricultural and Food Economics) were find that the butter market is international in the scope, and this scope is evolving from country to semi-global and next to regional. Butter market consists only of 11th EU countries in 2014. Such market has production of 3361 thousand tones, consumption of 3292 thousand tones and export and import at the level of 317 thousand tones, 238 thousand tones, respectively.
    Keywords: Production Economics, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:291530&r=all
  18. By: Kusz, Dariusz Andrzej
    Abstract: The main goal of the paper was to determine local institutions (organizations) and assessment of the level of private transaction costs incurred by beneficiaries of public aid related to the modernization of farms. The research was held in 2012 among 129 farms, which in 2004-2011 benefited from public financial aid in their investment activity. The selected farms were researched with the use of interview questionnaire concerning organisation of farms, obtained economic results, assessment of executed investments and relations of farmers with local institutions of the agricultural environment and the level of transaction costs. An estimation of the level of private transaction costs related to the public aid received in the investment activity was mad, on the basis of information obtained from farmers as part of the interview conducted using the questionnaire. It was found that for farmers the most important in the modernization process of farms were the Centre for Advisory Agricultural Service (CASS) and The Agency for Restructuring and Modernization of Agriculture (ARMA). According to the farmers’ opinion, the main barriers to cooperation with local organizations were the high costs of using their services and the difficult access to the institutions. The estimated level of private transaction costs incurred by the beneficiaries in relation to the acquired investment subsidies was low and should not constitute a barrier to obtaining public aid in the process of modernization of farms. On farms characterized by a lower value of investment outlays, the level of private transaction costs in relation to the acquired investment subsidies was higher than in other groups of farms. The largest share in the structure of estimated private transaction costs was related to the costs of collecting documentation and filling in applications.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Farm Management, International Development
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:iafepa:291529&r=all
  19. By: Joseph I. Uduji (University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria); Elda N. Okolo-Obasi (University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria); Simplice A. Asongu (Yaoundé, Cameroon)
    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impact of growth enhancement support scheme (GESS) on the enabling environment of smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. Its special focus is to investigate the GESS impact on access to rural farm credit and transport cost of smallholder farmers in the agricultural transformation agenda (ATA) in Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach – This paper adopts a survey research technique, aimed at gathering information from a representative sample of the population, as it is essentially cross-sectional that describes and interprets what exist at present. A total of one thousand, two hundred farmers were sampled across the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria. Findings – Results from the use of a double-hurdle model indicate that the GESS has a significant impact on farmers’ access to credit, but does not significantly affect rural farm transport cost, which subsequently influence the price of food in the country. Practical implication – This implies that if the federal government of Nigeria is to work towards an ideal agricultural transformation agenda, transport networks should be closely aligned with the GESS priorities to provide connectivity to rural areas that provide most of the country’s agricultural output. Originality/value – This research adds to the literature on agricultural and rural development debate in developing countries. It concludes that embracing rural finance and transportation infrastructure should form the foundation of the ATA in Nigeria, which in turn would provide the enabling environment for more widespread rural economy in sub-Saharan Africa.
    Keywords: Agricultural transformation agenda, Double-hurdle model, Smallholder farmers’ enabling environment
    JEL: Q10 Q14 L96 O40 O55
    Date: 2019–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:agd:wpaper:19/041&r=all
  20. By: Bartholomeu, Daniela B.; Alves, Paulo Nocera; Caixeta-Filho, José V.; Cruz, José C.
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291117&r=all
  21. By: Gori Maia, Alexandre; Fonseca, Camila Veneo Campos; Silveira, Rodrigo Lanna F.; Burney, Jennifer; Cesano, Daniele
    Keywords: Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291202&r=all
  22. By: Jorge Tarifa Fernández; Jerónimo de Burgos Jiménez; José Joaquín Céspedes Lorente
    Keywords: Supply chain integration; agriculture; proactivity; integration; environmental performance.
    JEL: M21 Q56
    Date: 2019–07
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ovr:docfra:1905&r=all
  23. By: Arellano Gonzalez, Jesus; Moore, Frances; AghaKouchak, Amir; Qin, Yue; Davis, Steven; Burney, Jennifer; Levy, Morgan
    Keywords: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291122&r=all
  24. By: Sauer, Christine M.; Reardon, Thomas A.; Tschirley, David L.; Waized, Betty; Alphonce, Roselyne; Ndyetabula, Daniel
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290779&r=all
  25. By: Van Sandt, Anders T.; Carpenter, Craig W.; Loveridge, Scott; Dudensing, Rebekka M.; Niehm, Linda; McKinney, Steven
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291300&r=all
  26. By: Colin Castillo, Sergio; Martinez-Cruz, Adan L.; Manríquez García, Naim; Vázquez-Pérez, Joel T.
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290765&r=all
  27. By: Nehring, Richard F.; Zhang, Wendong; Ghosh, Nilabja; Liebman, Matt; Sheng, Yu
    Keywords: International Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291015&r=all
  28. By: Gori Maia, Alexandre; Morales Martinez, Daniel; Burney, Jennifer; Cesano, Daniele
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291301&r=all
  29. By: Long, Abby; Jablonski, Becca B. R.; Costanigro, Marco; Frasier, W. Marshall
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290925&r=all
  30. By: Carlson, Andrea C.; Kuczynski, Kevin; Pannucci, TusaRebecca; Koegel, Kristin; Page, Elina T.; Tornow, Carina; Zimmerman, Thea Pamer
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290946&r=all
  31. By: Gottlieb, Paul D.; Dobis, Elizabeth A.; Hira, Anil; Reid, Neil; Goetz, Stephan J.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291296&r=all
  32. By: Narh, Alfred B.; Nalley, Lawton L.; Price, Heather; Shew, Aaron M.; Nayga, Rodolfo M.
    Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290933&r=all
  33. By: Fenton, Marieke; Lybbert, Travis J.; Cheon, Ji Yeon; Gjerdseth, Emma; Wang, Qian
    Keywords: Production Economics
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291170&r=all
  34. By: Tsai, Ming-Jou; Yu, Tun-Hsiang; Boyer, Christopher M.; Chen, Rachel JC
    Keywords: International Development
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:291017&r=all
  35. By: Hu, Ruifa; Chen, Qianqian; Sun, Yiduo; Zhang, Chao
    Keywords: Institutional and Behavioral Economics
    Date: 2019–06–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:aaea19:290759&r=all

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