nep-agr New Economics Papers
on Agricultural Economics
Issue of 2019‒05‒20
seventy papers chosen by
Angelo Zago
Università degli Studi di Verona

  1. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Smallholder commercial agriculture project (PAPAC) and participatory smallholder agriculture and artisanal fisheries development programme (PAPAFPA) By Alessandra, Garbero; Martina, Improta; Sónia, Gonçalves
  2. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Agricultural sector development programme –livestock (ASDP-L) and the agriculture service support programme (ASSP): Tanzania By Alessandra, Garbero; Bezawit, Beyene Chichaibelu
  3. Property Rights Insecurity and Agriculture Land Market - The Inherited Challenge of the Post-communist Land Reform in Albania By Zhllima, Edvin; Imami, Drini; Rama, Klodjan
  4. Market constraints, misallocation, and productivity in Viet Nam agriculture By Brandt Loren; Syerst Stephen; Restuccia Diego; Ayerst Stephen
  5. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Livestock and pasture development project (LPDP): Tajikistan By Romina, Cavatassi; Paola, Mallia
  6. A Microsimulation Model for the Agricultural Land Rental Market in Ireland By Loughrey, Jason; Hennessy, Thia
  7. Sub-Theme 1: E-Business and Value Chain Development in the Agricultural Sector By E., Ademola Oluwaseyi; A., Omotesho Olubunmi; L., Olaghere Ivie
  8. Regulating the Land Market on the Basis of Incomplete Information: the case of Romania By Luca, Lucian
  9. Investigating the Determinants of Finnish Agricultural Land Prices Using Generalised Additive Model By Valtiala, Juho PIetari; Ovaska, Sami; Sipiläinen, Timo
  10. Land Tenure and Property Rights Impacts on Adoption of Climate Smart Practices Among Smallholder Farmers in Nigeria By Kehinde, Mojisola O.; Shittu, Adebayo M.; Ogunnaike, Maria G.; Oyawole, Funminiyi P.; Akisanya, Lois T.
  11. What drives competition on the farmland market? A case study in Brittany (France) By Piet, Laurent; Melot, Romain; Diop, Soukeyna
  12. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - High value agriculture project in hill and mountain areas (HVAP): Nepal By Kashi, Kafle; Kwabena, Krah; Tisorn, Songsermsawas
  13. Of trackers and tractors. Using a smartphone app and compositional data analysis to explore the link between mechanization and intra-household allocation of time in Zambia By Daum, Thomas; Capezzone, Filippo; Birner, Regina
  14. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Participatory small irrigation development programme I (PASIDP I): results from a high frequency data collection - Ethiopia By Alessandra, Garbero; Bezawit, Beyene Chichaibelu
  15. Do forest-management plans and FSC certification reduce deforestation in the Congo basin? By Isabelle Tritsch; Gwenolé Le Velly; Benoit Mertens; Patrick Meyfroidt; Christophe Sannier; Jean-Sylvestre Makak; Kenneth Houngbedji
  16. Women in Agriculture (WIA) and Rural Households' Welfare in Contribution of Snail Production Business to the Income of Snail Farmers in Edo South, Nigeria By Ahmadu, J.; Oyoboh, D.E.
  17. Farming efficiency, cropland rental market and welfare effect: Evidence from panel data for rural Central Vietnam By Nguyen, Trung Thanh; Tran, Viet Tuan; Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Grote, Ulrike
  18. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Agricultural value chains support project (PAFA): Senegal By Alessandra, Garbero; Dieynab, Diatta; Markus, Olapade
  19. Consumers’ Perception of Food Safety Risk From Vegetables: A Rural - Urban Comparison By Thanh Mai Ha; Shamim Shakur; Kim Hang Pham Do
  20. Experts, Reputation and Umbrella Effects: Empirical Evidence from Wine Prices By Dieter Pennerstorfer; Christoph Weiss; Andreas Huber
  21. Crop prices and migration in Viet Nam By Narciso Gaia
  22. Sober optimism and the formation of international environmental agreements By Hiroaki SAKAMOTO; Larry KARP
  23. Climate change, rice production, and migration in Vietnamese households By Ricciuti Roberto; Baronchelli Adelaide
  24. What can we say about land prices? By Pedersen, Michael Friis; Olsen, Jakob Vesterlund
  25. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Guangxi integrated agricultural development project (GIADP): China By Alessandra, Garbero; Tisorn, Songsermsawas
  26. Does Access to Agricultural Credit Explain Land Use Choice? A Case of Odukpani in Cross River State, Nigeria By Etowa, Egbe B.; Elum, Zelda A.; Mwiido, Wmmanuel D.
  27. Awareness and Adoption Rates of Climate Smart Practices Among Cereal Farmers in Nigeria By Shittu, Adebayo M.; Kehinde, Mojisola O.; Ogunnaike, Maria G.; Oyawole, Funminiyi P.; Akisanya, Lois T.
  28. What Moves the German Land Market? A Decomposition of the Land Rent-Price Ratio By Plogmann, Jana; Mußhoff, Oliver; Odening, Martin; Ritter, Matthias
  29. How does joint evolution of social trust and land administration shape economic outcomes?: Evidence from Viet Nam By Dang Duc; Dang Kim; Vu Thi
  30. What are the Implications of Regulation of Acquisition of Agricultural and Forestry Land – Insights from an Analysis of Mental Models of Expert Stakeholders in Sweden using Thematic Analysis By Simon, Katalin; Hansson, Helena
  31. Gender and Returns to Marketing of Non-Timber Forest Products in Southwest Nigeria By Obayelu, Oluwakemi Adeola; Farinola, Lucy Adeteju
  32. Unexpected effects of land fragmentation By Hoang Trung
  33. An Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade: The Effects of an Import Ban on Cape Colony Slaveholders By Martins, Igor
  34. Can Nigeria Sustain Ban on Rice Importation Overtime? Analysis of Its Determinants on Agri-Business Development in Commercial Rice Production and Processing (1991-2015) By Dzever, D.D.; Ayoola, J.B.
  35. Determinants of Rising Price of Yam in Nigeria: Times-Series Approach By Ajibade T.B.; Ayinde O.E.; Abdoulaye T.; Ayinde, K.
  36. Assessment of Food Security Status and Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change Among Farm Households in Kwara State By Ogunbiyi, K.K.; Olajide, O.A.
  37. Economic Appraisal of Inert Atmosphere Silo for Wheat Storage By I.T, Oyebamiji; M.O, Olatilewa; S.A, Adetayo; S.N, Oyewole
  38. Is India’s Employment Guarantee Program Successfully Challenging Her Historical Inequalities? By Kartik Misra
  39. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Rural development support programme in Guéra: Chad By Romina, Cavatassi; Athur, Mabiso; Mohamed, Abouaziza; Eric, Djimeu
  40. Effect of Climate Change on Small and Medium Scale Agro-Allied Enterprises in Ogun State, Nigeria By Thompson, O.A.; Amos, T.T.
  41. Gender Gaps and Adoption of Climate Smart Practices Among Cereal Farm Households in Nigeria By Fapojuwo, O.E.; Shittu, A.M.; Ogunnaike, M.G.; Kehinde, M.O.; Oyawole, F.P.; Akisanya, L.T.
  42. Decoupling values of agricultural externalities according to scale: a spatial hedonic approach in Brittany By Abdel Fawaz Osseni; François Bareille; Pierre Dupraz
  43. Adaptation Strategies and Farmers' Perception on the Effect of Climate Change on Cassava Production in Ondo State, Nigeria By Oduntan, O.; Oluyide, O.G.; Aderinola, E.A.
  44. Analysis of factors Affecting Agribusiness in Oyo State, Nigeria By Fato, B.F.; Oyegbami, A.; Nwali, C.S.; Obute, J.E.
  45. Analysis of the Awareness of Banana Bunchy Top Disease Among Farmers in Idologun Village Ogun State By Akinyemi, S.O.S; Adebisi-Adelani, O.; Layade, A.A.; Adegbite, O.; Arogundade, O.; Fajinmi, O.B.; Kumar, L.
  46. Impacts of accessing extension on agricultural production profit: Empirical evidence from the Viet Nam Access to Rural Households Survey By Thiep Do; Nhung Thi
  47. Perception on Climate Variability and Adaptation Strategies Among Plantain Producing Farmers in Omi-Adio Area, Oyo State, Nigeria By Sanusi, M.M.; Oyedeji, O.O.; Akerele, D.
  48. From individual farms to agriholdings: Methodological implications. An explorative regional case study in East Germany By Laschewski, Lutz; Tietz, Andreas; Zavyalova, Ekaterina
  49. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Coastal climate resilient infrastructure project (CCRIP): Bangladesh By Aslihan, Arslan; Daniel, Higgins; Saiful, Islam
  50. Weather Shocks By Ewen Gallic; Gauthier Vermandel
  51. The social relation to the environment in contemporary capitalism: theoretical reflections and empirical explorations By Cahen-Fourot, Louison
  52. Perceived Effects of Climate Change on Cassava Production and Farmers Coping Strategies in Ahoada-East Local Government Area, Rivers State Nigeria By Tasie, C.M.; Wilcox, G.I.
  53. Indigenous Climate Change Adaptation Strategies As Practiced by Farm Households in Udi Lga of Enugu State, Nigeria By Chiemela, Stella Nwawulu; Chiemela, Chinedum Jachinma; Chiebonam, Onyia Chukwuemeka; Mgbebu, Ezekiel Sunday
  54. Mitigating Environmental Impact of Locust Bean Agribusiness: Potentials of Modifying Seed Collection Time and Pre-Germination Treatments of Parkia Biglobosa By Alawode, Ramatallah Adenike
  55. Investigating Climate Smart Agricultural Practices in Livestock Production: An Application of Principal Component Analysis By Ekpa, Daniel; Akinyemi, Mudashiru; Ibrahim, Hassan Ishaq
  56. Socio-Economic Determinants of Informal Savings for Small Scale Cassava Production in Abi Lga, Cross River State, NIgeria By Kuye, O.O.; Ettah, O.I.; Oniah, M.O.; Egbe, B.M.
  57. Assessment of Poverty Status Among Fish Farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria By A.E, Sodeeq; O.F, Ashaolu; A.G, Ibrahim; L.O, Lamidi; M.B, Salawu; S.D, Idowu; B.T, Ogunleye
  58. On Technological Change and Yield Resiliency in Canadian Crop Yields By Ng, Horlick; Ker, Alan P.
  59. Implications of Land Market Imperfections on Policy Design By Tavrov, Dan; Nivievskyi, Oleg
  60. Hurricanes, Climate Change Policies and Electoral Accountability By Stefano Gagliarducci; M. Daniele Paserman; Eleonora Patacchini
  61. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Community-based forestry development project in southern states (DECOFOS): Mexico By Romina, Cavatassi; Federica, Alfani; Adriana, Paolantonio; Paola, Mallia
  62. Analysis of Climate Change Effects on Rice Output in Ebonyi State, Nigeria: 1990-2015 By Nwali, Nte I.; Okoro, Frank N.
  63. Consumer's Preference for Honey in Ibadan North Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria By A., Obisesan Adekemi; A., Olasoji Oluwaseyi
  64. A Review Assessment of Rural Households Food Coping Strategies in Northern Nigeria: A Window for Investment and Intervention By Ahungwa, G. T.; Mamman, B. Y.; Adeleke, E. A.
  65. Dynamics between trading volume, volatility and open interest in agricultural futures markets: A Bayesian time-varying coefficient approach By Robert Czudaj
  66. Policies and Agribusiness Development: The Nigerian Experience By Tijani, I.A.; Alawode, O.O.; Fawehinmi, o.O.; Gafar, A.O; Kolade, O.A.
  67. Enterprise Analyses Across Cassava Agribusiness Value Chain in Niger-Delta Region of Nigeria: Implications for Agribusiness, Women and Youth Policies By Coker, Ayodeji Alexander Ajibola; Molokwu, Christopher C.; Odoemena, Benjamin C.; Tuedogheye, Jeremiah G.; Elega, Julius O.
  68. Marketing Analysis of Fresh and Processed (Barbecue) Along Catfish Value Chain, Implication for Youth Livelihood in Southeast, Nigeria By Bcn-Chendo, G.N.; Obasi P.C.; Osuji, M.N.; Nwosu, F.O.; Emenyonu, C.A.; lbcagwa, B.O.; Uhuegbulem, I.J.
  69. IFAD IMPACT ASSESSMENT - Plan VIDA-PEEP to eradicate extreme poverty – Phase I: Bolivia By Adriana, Paolantonio; Romina, Cavatassi; Kristen, McCollum
  70. Assessment of Land Tillage Practices and Related Problems Among Rice Farmers in Agreicultural Zone I, Niger State By Bwala, Madu Ali; Tiamiyu, S.A.; Adedeji, S.; Kolo, Alhaji Y.

  1. By: Alessandra, Garbero; Martina, Improta; Sónia, Gonçalves
    Abstract: Despite the progress made over the last decades across several socio-economic indicators, poverty incidence remains persistently high in São Tomé e Príncipe, with over two-thirds of the population living below the poverty line of US$3.2 (World Bank 2018). A set of constraints imposed by the country’s insularity, small market size and agroecological conditions make the country extremely vulnerable to market and climate shocks. Its economy relies heavily on imports, which are counterbalanced by a narrow set of exports, with cacao taking the lion share (approximately 70% of total exports, World Bank 2018). Agricultural production, however, has declined since the country’s independence in 1975 and productivity has remained consistently low, hindering economic wellbeing and progress of rural livelihoods, particularly of those relying on small-scale farming as a key source of income. The two projects evaluated in this report - the Participatory Smallholder Agriculture and Artisanal Fisheries Development Programme (PAPAFPA; implemented 2003-15) and, its successor, the Smallholder Commercial Agriculture Project (PAPAC; 2015-2020) – focus on this group of farmers and on three value chains: cacao, coffee and pepper. The projects interventions revolve around the promotion of certified organic farming and the creation of export-oriented cooperatives in each value chain, together with the investment in rural infrastructure. The projects’ cooperatives play a key role in the implementation of the interventions in the field, by working closely with the farmers and their associations, providing professional training, productive assets and facilitating linkages to the market. The interventions aim at increasing agricultural production in a sustainable manner via organic farming, enhancing market access and resilience to shocks, thereby promoting small farmers’ income stability and food security. Organic certification labels have been increasingly used across the world to pursue social and environmental sustainability in supply chains for agricultural products. However, there is still considerable debate surrounding their effectiveness in achieving those goals. Robust quantitative evidence of their impact on crop prices, productivity and overall welfare of rural livelihoods is scarce, and for São Tomé e Príncipe inexistent. Thus, the current impact assessment fills a gap in this literature by using a mixed-methods approach to assess and quantitatively estimate the impact of a project centred around certification schemes through rigorous counterfactual-based methods. Given the fundamental role played by the value-chain cooperatives in the project, it also contributes to a growing literature on the impact of associativism and cooperativism on the economic mobility of farmers and rural households.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288466&r=all
  2. By: Alessandra, Garbero; Bezawit, Beyene Chichaibelu
    Abstract: Decades of agricultural research have led to the development of technological innovations and improved farming practices that hold a huge potential for increasing agricultural production and achieving global food security. However, the level of dissemination and adoption of this knowledge is still inadequate, especially among smallholder farmers in developing countries. In an effort to enhance the adoption of such technical innovations and improved practices, agricultural extension approaches like Farmer Field Schools (FFS) have been widely advocated. FFS are usually participatory and informal methods of training and assisting farmers in their own locality, to adopt and adapt new technologies that can improve their farming practices. The ASDP-L and ASSP projects were implemented in Zanzibar between 2007 to 2017, with an aim to contribute towards the Government initiatives to increase agricultural productivity and profitability, generate employment in rural areas and ensure national and household food security. The purpose of the projects was to empower crop and livestock farmers through capacity building and training activities offered in the form of FFS, so as to improve their agricultural production systems. The impact assessment on the ASDP-L and ASSP projects is based on a quantitative household data collected in 2018 from about 2082 FFS participants and non-participants. Information obtained via a qualitative study by the project implementation team was used to support the quantitative survey design and interpretation of results from the quantitative data analysis for this impact assessment. Statistical matching techniques were used in the sampling and data analysis to identify and select a proper comparison group for the FFS participants.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288463&r=all
  3. By: Zhllima, Edvin; Imami, Drini; Rama, Klodjan
    Abstract: Land consolidation has been viewed by policy makers as panacea for tackling the inherited challenges of Albania´s egalitarian land reform. The paper argues that farmers´ efforts towards farm consolidation through land purchase and rent-in are affected by overall structural factors. Farm structure, farm-orientation and other socio-economic factors play an important role in farmers´ decision to purchase and rent-in agricultural land. Rental market has been the most common mechanism for consolidation, although agriculture land rent is not suitable for all agriculture activities, such as those which require long term investments.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–05–13
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288448&r=all
  4. By: Brandt Loren; Syerst Stephen; Restuccia Diego; Ayerst Stephen
    Abstract: We examine important changes in agriculture in Viet Nam in the context of ongoing structural changes in the economy. We use a household-level panel dataset and a quantitative framework to document the extent and consequences of factor misallocation in agriculture during the period between 2006 and 2016.Despite rapid growth in agricultural productivity and a reallocation of factor inputs to more productive farmers, we find that misallocation across farmers remains high and increased during the period. Reallocation of factor inputs has not been strong enough to accommodate substantial changes in farm productivity over time.Our analysis also reveals important differences between the north and south regions.
    Keywords: Misallocation,Regional characteristics,Agriculture,Productivity,Agricultural productivity
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-114&r=all
  5. By: Romina, Cavatassi; Paola, Mallia
    Abstract: The Republic of Tajikistan is a land locked country, where most of the territory (93%) is occupied by mountains. Poverty is quite widespread with about half of the country’s population living below the poverty line. The poorest people in the country reside in the Khatlon region, where 78 per cent of the population lives under the national poverty line and where land is degraded, the availability of inputs and credit is limited, irrigation facilities are lacking, and access to improved technologies and markets is poor (World Bank, 2015). About 50 per cent of the population depends on agriculture for livelihood, and most farmers lack access to adequate inputs, resources, technology and markets. Livestock is a key part of the agricultural sector and it is of critical importance in the livelihood strategy of poor rural households in Tajikistan. The pasture management system in Tajikistan remains largely unchanged since Soviet times with the exception that the lowest rung in the management system (corporate farms) no longer has adequate resources for pasture upkeep nor an adequate management system. The inadequacy of such a centralized management system is reflected in the overexploitation of pasture which has led to a vicious cycle of ever-lower animal yields and rural income, which is triggered by the legitimate will of farmers to increase their livestock production by adding animal units. This, in turn, has created a greater demand for feed, leading to a decrease in the feed per animal ratio, to a deterioration of the grazing land and to a further fall in animal weight. As a result, the rise in livestock inventories coupled with the fall in feed supplies has meant the dramatic fall of livestock productivity, low milk and meat yields and land degradation in the country, further worsening poverty among households. To address and overcome these problems, the Government of Tajikistan launched the Livestock and Pasture Development Project (LPDP) in August 2011, a project financed jointly by IFAD and the Government of the Republic of Tajikistan. The project had the goal of reducing poverty in the Khatlon region, increasing the nutritional status and incomes of rural poor households by boosting livestock productivity through the improvement of the productive capacity of pastures.
    Keywords: Farm Management, Food Security and Poverty, Productivity Analysis
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288452&r=all
  6. By: Loughrey, Jason; Hennessy, Thia
    Abstract: Agricultural land rental markets contribute towards structural change in the farming sector by offering farmers the opportunity to adjust their farm size without committing to a transfer of land ownership. In Irish agriculture, the share of agricultural land being rented is however, among the lowest in Europe. Many Irish farmers continue to produce output and remain in agricultural employment despite persistently negative market returns. This implies that land-use decisions are not solely influenced by market returns. In this paper, we utilize Teagasc National Farm survey data to analyse the agricultural land rental market in Ireland with a newly developed microsimulation model. This model is compared to an equilibrium model of the land rental market. The microsimulation model has a number of advantages over the equilibrium model in addressing path dependency, the interaction between landowners and tenants and the farm size concentration. The model requires some further refinement in simulating the variability of land rental prices between contracts.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–05–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288439&r=all
  7. By: E., Ademola Oluwaseyi; A., Omotesho Olubunmi; L., Olaghere Ivie
    Abstract: Plantains .are crops of econoptic value and can serve as a source of foreign exchange if given prop r attention. Not much has been documented on this potential especially as regards the profit accrued by the various actors in the plantain value chain. The study estimated the profit margin of players along the plantain value chain, examined the factors affecting the gain of actors and identified the constraints faced by the actors. Stratified sampling technique was used to select 125 producers, processors and marketers in Osun state. Primary data was collected using well-structured interview schedule. Gross and marketing margin, Ordinary least square regression and Likert-type scale were used for data analysis. The study revealed that the gross margin accrued to plantain producers wa. N207, 777.42/ha per annum, while the marketing margin/bunch for the plantain processors and marketers was N4 l 5 ( 41.5%) and N378 (37.8%) respectively. Household size, quantities of labour, suckers and pesticide used were factors that affected the gross margin of producers. Total input cost and transportation cost contributed to the marketing margin of processors and marketers. Maj or constraint faced by plantain farmers was the high cost of labour. The high cost of plantain and lack of a uniform unit of measurement were the most severe constraints among processors and marketers respectively. The study concluded that the plantain value chain was profitable for a ll the actors, and recommended that the government should formulate incentives that would encourage more people to go into plantain production, processing and marketing.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288302&r=all
  8. By: Luca, Lucian
    Abstract: The paper presents the most important characteristics of land market in Romania after the accession to the EU, i.e. farmland prices, volume of farmland transactions, as well as an estimation of farmland areas owned by foreigners, in order to understand, on the basis of these data, the reasons behind the recent initiative for the modification of the law regulating agricultural land sale-purchase. The conclusion is that the eventual modification of the law will not bring any improvement to land market operation in Romania, but risks breaching the EU Accession Treaty in order to create privileges for certain categories of farmers.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–04–25
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288440&r=all
  9. By: Valtiala, Juho PIetari; Ovaska, Sami; Sipiläinen, Timo
    Abstract: The agricultural sector in Finland has witnessed a rapid structural change since the Finnish EU-accession. At the same time, agricultural land prices have increased considerably. Using a hedonic pricing model, we investigated the characteristics affecting the prices of parcels sold. We analysed a dataset consisting of over a thousand additional agricultural land transactions and discovered several regional and production related characteristics affecting prices. The generalised additive modelling framework enabled estimation of a regional price level as a smooth trend surface. The model captured spatial dependency in the prices while retaining the sensible interpretation of the results.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–02–27
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288447&r=all
  10. By: Kehinde, Mojisola O.; Shittu, Adebayo M.; Ogunnaike, Maria G.; Oyawole, Funminiyi P.; Akisanya, Lois T.
    Keywords: Farm Management
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288422&r=all
  11. By: Piet, Laurent; Melot, Romain; Diop, Soukeyna
    Abstract: We investigate factors which may drive the number of agents who compete for a specific piece of agricultural land by fitting count data models on data originating from a local committee, the CDOA, which is responsible for agricultural guidance of the prefect in delivering the necessary ‘authorizations to farm’. We notably find that the size of the offered land positively contributes to the competitor number, and that new entrants face less competition. The seemingly counterintuitive result that a locally denser farmer population yields fewer competitors is given a line of potential explanation pertaining to the likely role of farmer unions.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–04–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288443&r=all
  12. By: Kashi, Kafle; Kwabena, Krah; Tisorn, Songsermsawas
    Abstract: This report assesses the impact of the High Value Agriculture Project in Hill and Mountain Areas (HVAP) of Nepal co-financed by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the Government of Nepal (GoN), and the SNV Netherlands Development Organization. The project was implemented between February 2011 and September 2018, and aimed at reducing rural poverty and improving food security in the remote hill and mountainous areas of the landlocked state. Nepal's geographical landscape presents numerous challenges to local economic growth and rural development. The livelihood of the people living in Nepal's rugged landscape is often characterized by low agricultural productivity, and limited access to markets and services. HVAP is a unique project both in terms of its geographical coverage and its type of interventions provided to the target groups. Its unique feature is the inclusive value chain development component which links different actors in the agricultural value chain including producers, retailers, wholesalers, input suppliers, technical service providers, credit and commerce groups, and government line ministries and agencies. In addition, the project helps strengthen the agricultural service delivery by facilitating the linkages among producers, crop and livestock extension speacialists, and technical service providers such as agrovets, para-vets, and plant protectionists through the service market strengthening component. The project covers seven hill and mountaneous districts in Karnali Province (formerly the Mid-Western Development Region)1 and identifies seven agricultural commodities as high value commodities in this area: apple, ginger, vegetable seeds, off-season vegetables turmeric, timur (Sichuan pepper), and goat. To ensure gender representativeness and promite social cohesiveness, all support services are delivered through producer organizations (PO) which are local producer groups or co-operatives that are representative of women and ethinc minorities in the area. The project supported smallholder farmers in 456 POs by strengthening their access to input markets, output markets, and service markets as well as their skills and capacity to produce market-oriented high value agricultural commodities. As part of the awareness and skill development training, the project provided a 30-day business literacy curriculum to both female and male farmers. The project also offered technical support to service markets through providing technical training activities and market information to service providers.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288453&r=all
  13. By: Daum, Thomas; Capezzone, Filippo; Birner, Regina
    Abstract: Digital tools may help to study socioeconomic aspects of agricultural development that are difficult to measure such as the effects of new technologies, policies and practices on the intra-household allocation of time. As new technologies, policies and practices may target different crops and tasks, they can affect time-use of men, women, boys and girls differently. Development strategies that overlook such effects can fail or have negative consequences for vulnerable household members. In this paper, the effects of agricultural mechanization on time-use in smallholder farming households in Zambia were investigated. For this, a novel data collection method was used: a pictorial smartphone application that allows real-time recording of time-use to eliminate recall bias. Existing studies analyzing intra-household allocation of resources often focus on adult males and females. This study paid particular attention to boys and girls. The study also addressed seasonal variations. For data analysis, compositional data analysis was used, which yields higher accuracy than univariate analysis by accounting for the co-dependence and sum constraint of time-use data. The study found that women benefit relatively more from mechanization with regard to time-use during land preparation, which leads to gender differentiation; for households using manual labor, such differentiation was not found. There was some evidence that the time "saved" is used for off-farm and domestic work. No negative second-round effects (such as higher labor burdens) during weeding and harvesting/processing and no negative effects on children were found. The study debunks some myths related to gender roles in African smallholder agriculture, opens the field to more studies on technology adoption and time-use and suggests that gender roles are changing with agricultural transformation.
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Production Economics, Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies, Research Methods/ Statistical Methods
    Date: 2019–05–14
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:ubzefd:288434&r=all
  14. By: Alessandra, Garbero; Bezawit, Beyene Chichaibelu
    Abstract: This report presents the results of an ex-post impact assessment of the Participatory Small-scale Irrigation Development Programme (PASIDP), a project financed by IFAD and implemented in Ethiopia between 2008 and 2015. This agricultural project aimed at improving food security and increasing income of beneficiaries by providing access to small-scale irrigation infrastructure systems in four regions of Ethiopia. The objective of the impact assessment was to investigate both the sustainability of the impacts and the resilience capacity of beneficiaries in a context characterized by adverse weather conditions. An innovative data collection was put in place to study the impact on areas where a protracted drought was taking place. In particular, using panel data that allowed one to follow household over time, the analysis tested whether the irrigation schemes were able to provide a protective and sustained effect towards reducing vulnerability and enhancing smallholders households resilience capacity to cope with the longer term variability of the climatic shocks.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288438&r=all
  15. By: Isabelle Tritsch (UMR ECOFOG - Ecologie des forêts de Guyane - UG - Université de Guyane - AgroParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CIRAD - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - UA - Université des Antilles - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique); Gwenolé Le Velly (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - FRE2010 - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - UM - Université de Montpellier - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier); Benoit Mertens (ATILF - Analyse et Traitement Informatique de la Langue Française - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique); Patrick Meyfroidt (Earth and Life Institute [Louvain-La-Neuve] - UCL - Université Catholique de Louvain); Christophe Sannier (SIRS - Systèmes d'Information à Référence Spatiale - Systèmes d'Information à Référence Spatiale); Jean-Sylvestre Makak (Geospatial Company); Kenneth Houngbedji (AFD - Agence française de développement)
    Abstract: To allow for the production of timber while preserving conservation values, forestry regulations in the Congo Basin have made Forest Management Plans (FMPs) mandatory in logging concessions. This paper uses original highresolution maps of forest-cover changes and official records on the activities of logging concessions to analyze the impact of FMPs on deforestation in this region. We apply quasi-experimental and difference-in-difference approaches to evaluate the change in deforestation in concessions that implemented an FMP. We find that between 2000 and 2010, deforestation was 74% lower in concessions with an FMP compared to others. Building on a theory of change, further analyses revealed that this decrease in deforestation takes at least five years to occur, and is highest around communities located in and nearby logging concessions and in areas close to previous deforestation. These findings suggest that FMPs reduce deforestation by allowing concessions to rotate cycles of timber extraction, thereby avoiding the overexploitation of areas that were previously logged, and by the better regulation of access to concessions by closing former logging roads to limit illegal activities such as slash and burn agriculture, hunting and the illegal harvest of timber or fuelwood.
    Keywords: forest management plan,FSC certification,deforestation,quasi-experimental matching,causal mechanisms,Congo Basin
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hal:wpceem:halshs-02103836&r=all
  16. By: Ahmadu, J.; Oyoboh, D.E.
    Abstract: This study examined the contribution of snail production to the income of snail farmers in Edu South of Nigeria. The specific objectives of the study were to describe the socio-economic characteristics of snail producers, estimate the costs and returns of snail production in the stud:area, examine the effect of snail production on income of snail farmers and identity the constraint, to the production of snail in the study area.A two-stage sampling technique comprising purposive and snowballing sampling techniques was employed to select I 08 respondents for the stud:,.. However, 100 respondents provided useful information that was used for the analysis. Data wcrl collected using structured questionnaire. Analysis of data was Data analysis was done using descriptive statistics and budgeting technique (such as gross margin and net profit analyses as well as return on investment).The results indicated that majority of the respondents were females (61 <\;, l with average age of38 years. Most of them were married (81%) with average household size or~ persons. They had average experience in snail rearing of 8 years andmost of them (88%) v\trl literate. The results further showed that the business of snail production in the study area \\,1, profitable with gross margin, net profit and return on investment of N359,455.00, W339,533.(li_l and 2.04 per annum respectively. Without income from snail production, the snail rearers had average annual income from other sources oflivelihood ofWl,377,519.00.The farmers had average annual income ofWl,717,052.00 with income from snail production accounting for 20%. Of all the sources of income available to the respondents, snail production's contribution was the highest except income from civil service (22.18%). Thus, snail production had made remarkable contribution to improving the income of the snail producers.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Farm Management
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288340&r=all
  17. By: Nguyen, Trung Thanh; Tran, Viet Tuan; Nguyen, Thanh-Tung; Grote, Ulrike
    Abstract: Using panel data of more than 1,000 rural households from three rural provinces in Vietnam, we find that farming efficiency is a driver of cropland rental market development that enhances land use efficiency and results in an overall income gain for market participants. Our findings highlight the importance of cropland rental markets in facilitating economic transformation in rural areas of rapidly growing economies, but also indicate the need to take care of the poor to ensure that they are not left behind.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–04–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288441&r=all
  18. By: Alessandra, Garbero; Dieynab, Diatta; Markus, Olapade
    Abstract: Value chain development is an important strategy to achieve sustainable development for smallholder farmers. It focuses not only on farmers and their direct livelihood but recognizes that sustainable agricultural projects ought to consider the entire production process by not only improving the factors of production for smallholder farmers but also allowing for greater integration into local markets, and the strengthening of key stakeholders along the value chain. The Agricultural Value Chains Support Project (in French Projet d’Appui aux Filières Agricoles (PAFA)) capitalizes on the value chain approach to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. Approved in 2008 and put into effect on February 5th 2010, the Agricultural Value Chains Support Project has, as of today, reached 37,734 households. The project is articulated around five components: (1) agricultural diversification and access to local market (2) development and structuring of regional value chains, (3) national coordination, knowledge management and project management, (4) climate change adaptation, and (5) support services for rural finance. The project was innovative in that, in addition to providing support to farmers through producer organisations (POs), there was an emphasis on improving concertation and collaboration around key value chains.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288450&r=all
  19. By: Thanh Mai Ha (School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, Palmerston North); Shamim Shakur (School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand); Kim Hang Pham Do (School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand)
    Abstract: Rapid urbanization brings challenges to managing food safety in Vietnam. Today, consumers pay more attention to the safety of food, particularly vegetables. This paper investigates the impact of consumer perception of food safety risk on self-reported vegetable consumption and then compares the determinants of risk perception between the rural and the urban region. We conducted a survey and observe a decline in self-reported vegetable consumption as a consequence of heightened risk perception among residents in the Hanoi area. The differences, as well as the similarities in the underlying drivers of risk perception, were identified across regions. In both regions, information about food incidents and perceived consequence of hazards associated with vegetables shaped risk perception of vegetables. Respondents’ age, education, and trust in food retailers at wet markets determined risk perception in the rural area, but not in the urban region. Personal experience with vegetable poisoning, whether the household was growing vegetables, perceived control over hazards, and trust in responsible institutions only influenced risk perception in the urban region. We suggest that these spatial disparities in behaviours should be taken into account in designing and implementing risk communication programs and food safety policies in Vietnam.
    Keywords: food safety, risk perception, rural-urban, Vietnam
    JEL: Q18 D12 Q13
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:mas:dpaper:1902&r=all
  20. By: Dieter Pennerstorfer; Christoph Weiss; Andreas Huber
    Abstract: We investigate the relationship between external quality evaluation via experts, firm reputation and product prices and extend the existing empirical literature in three dimensions. First, we empirically account for endogenous reputation effects. An increase in quality has an immediate positive impact on product prices but also improves the reputation of a firm, which contributes to higher prices in the future. Secondly, we analyse umbrella effects of reputation: investments in product quality of the ’top product‘ are particularly profitable as they also generate a ’ reputational dividend‘ for other products with lower quality. And finally, we investigate selection effects in expert evaluations. Experts typically evaluate a selection of products only and we find endogenous selection effects to be important for analysing product quality empirically.
    Keywords: experts evaluations, hedonic pricing, wine quality, endogenous reputation, sample selection, umbrella branding
    JEL: C33 L66 Q11
    Date: 2019–03
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:jku:econwp:2019_08&r=all
  21. By: Narciso Gaia
    Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of commodity prices, in particular rice and coffee, on the individual decision of migrating in Viet Nam.As most coffee production is sold by households for exports, we would expect that coffee price shocks would have a direct effect on the probability of migrating. On the other hand, we would anticipate that fluctuations in rice prices have little or no effect on migration decisions, given that rice is mainly produced for household consumption.The results of the analysis confirm our assumptions. We provide evidence that the lower the coffee price, the higher the likelihood of migrating. This evidence seems to suggest that migration acts as a shock-coping strategy.We find that rice prices have no effect on the probability of migrating. We further explore the extent of migrants’ self-selection and show that lower coffee prices increase the migration probability of individuals with lower education.
    Keywords: Migration,Price shocks
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-142&r=all
  22. By: Hiroaki SAKAMOTO; Larry KARP
    Abstract: We analyze a dynamic model of international environmental agreements (IEAs) where countries cannot make long-term commitments or use sanctions or rewards to induce cooperation. Countries can communicate with each other to build endogenous beliefs about the random consequences of (re)opening negotiation. If countries are patient, an effective agreement can be reached after a succession of short-lived ineffective agreements. This eventual success requires \sober optimism": the understanding that cooperation is possible but not easy to achieve. Negotiations matter because beliefs are important. An empirical application illustrates the importance of sober optimism in the climate agreement.
    Keywords: Environmental agreements; Climate change; Dynamic game
    JEL: C72 C73 D62 H41 Q54
    Date: 2019–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:kue:epaper:e-19-002&r=all
  23. By: Ricciuti Roberto; Baronchelli Adelaide
    Abstract: This paper analyses the relationship between climate and migration in rural households in Viet Nam.We propose an instrumental variable approach that controls for the potential endogeneity between crop production and migration using monthly minimum temperatures in the growing season as an instrument of rice production. Results show that the rise in minimum temperature during the core month of the growing season (i.e. June) does cause a reduction in rice production which, in turn, has a positive impact on people’s propensity to migrate.This finding is robust to the use of different estimators and plausible violations to exogeneity of the instrument.
    Keywords: Food industry and trade,Migration,Climate change
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-86&r=all
  24. By: Pedersen, Michael Friis; Olsen, Jakob Vesterlund
    Abstract: Stakeholders in agricultural land markets can have a legitimate interest in the impact of policy changes on land prices. Agricultural economists may be asked to answer questions regarding the potential impacts of suggested policy changes on land price, ex ante. This paper addresses the question of what agricultural economists can answer, given enquiries into such matters. Based on a comparison of methodologies used the paper concludes, that even though methods in the field are advanced they tend to focus on either a cash flow dimension or a quality dimension of land price, while the questions that stakeholders need answered require both.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–02–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288442&r=all
  25. By: Alessandra, Garbero; Tisorn, Songsermsawas
    Abstract: Improving market access of smallholder farmers in the developing world is considered an important approach to moving them out of poverty and increasing their economic mobility. In China, rural poverty has declined at a phenomenal speed within just two decades, and much of this success story is attributable to rapid income growth in rural areas. Thus, having a good understanding of how development efforts in rural China may help alleviate poverty and improving economic mobility is of particular interest for policy, as they are instrumental in informing future project design and scaling-up of success stories to other regions in China as well as to other countries. The Guangxi Integrated Agricultural Development Project (GIADP) is an example of a development effort aimed at increasing rural household income in China through three project components: community infrastructure development, agricultural production and marketing support, and rural environmental improvement. The project was approved by the Executive Board of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in December 2011, entered into effect in January 2012, and ran until March 2017. Interventions delivered covered three main components: community infrastructure improvements, agricultural production and marketing support, and interventions aimed at preserving the rural environment.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Farm Management, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288456&r=all
  26. By: Etowa, Egbe B.; Elum, Zelda A.; Mwiido, Wmmanuel D.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288423&r=all
  27. By: Shittu, Adebayo M.; Kehinde, Mojisola O.; Ogunnaike, Maria G.; Oyawole, Funminiyi P.; Akisanya, Lois T.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288421&r=all
  28. By: Plogmann, Jana; Mußhoff, Oliver; Odening, Martin; Ritter, Matthias
    Abstract: In this paper, we apply the dynamic Gordon growth model to Western Germany and decompose the rent-price ratio into the expected present values of rental growth rates, real interest rates, and a land premium, i.e., the excess return on investment. This analysis reveals that the recent price surge on agricultural land markets was not unprecedented; that the land market rent-price ratio is rather low compared to other markets and varies considerably among federal states; and that (expected) premia for land are mostly negative, rendering investments in farmland unprofitable for financial investors. Finally, we find that changing expected present values of returns on land investments are the major driver for land price volatility.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–04–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288444&r=all
  29. By: Dang Duc; Dang Kim; Vu Thi
    Abstract: This paper examines how the interaction of social trust and institutions, such as land administration, affects household economic decisions in Viet Nam.Using a panel dataset of rural households from 2008 to 2014, we show that negative consequences of the duration of land administration on credit access, agricultural investment, and land use rights have been mitigated in communes with higher level of trust.These results support the view that trust complements formal institutions.Â
    Keywords: Trust,Agricultural industries,Land rights
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-98&r=all
  30. By: Simon, Katalin; Hansson, Helena
    Abstract: Agricultural and forestry land markets are regulated in several European countries. However, assessing the economic consequences of land market regulation for agricultural and forestry firms is methodologically challenging for various reasons. The aim of this study is to highlight the usefulness of exploring expert stakeholders’ mental models in order to gain insights into the economic impacts of agricultural and forestry land market regulation. We use thematic analysis based on in-depth interview data to explore Swedish expert stakeholders’ mental models about the regulation of the Swedish agricultural and forestry land market. Findings point to that the current regulation does not have any major impacts on the economic situation of agricultural and forestry firms in Sweden.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–02–28
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288445&r=all
  31. By: Obayelu, Oluwakemi Adeola; Farinola, Lucy Adeteju
    Abstract: Marketing of commercially important Non-timber Forest Products (NTFPs) can be a potential source of livelihoods and a major source of rural income for both men and women. Many of these NTFPs have market demand, so they offer an opportunity to earn cash income especially in cash-constrained rural economies where alternative sources of cash-income generating employments arc very limited. The study assessed gender and returns to non-timber forest products marketing in Omo Forest Reserve in Ogun State. Data was obtained from 192 respondents through a multistage sampling process to select four villages each of the four administrative areas (JI, J3, J4 and J6) of the forest reserve. Results showed that a majority of the respondents were female with a mean age of 4 7±9 .41 years and an average household size of7±3.22 members. A typical household had an average mean dependency ratio of 1.1±0.83. About 83.3% of the respondents had at least primary education and there was a significant difference in the means of total cost, gross margin, profit and marketing efficiency from marketing ofNTFPs among the male and female extractors. High transaction cost was the most severe constraint faced during the collection of NTFPs. Marketing of these NTFPs was profitable and highly efficient.
    Keywords: Marketing, Production Economics
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288362&r=all
  32. By: Hoang Trung
    Abstract: Using instrumental variable method and Viet Nam Access to Resources Household Surveys of 2008–16, I examine the effect of land fragmentation on child outcomes.The study shows that higher land fragmentation decreases child school dropout. Land fragmentation has significant impacts on school dropout of children aged 10–15, however, it does not have any impact on school dropout of children aged 6–10. I explain these findings through one particular mechanism—that is women empowerment.A higher level of land fragmentation increases women’s empowerment to decide on visits to family, friends or relatives, on the purchase of daily goods, on large purchases, on her own health, and on her children’s health.
    Keywords: Child education,Instrumental variable,Lnd fragmentation
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-125&r=all
  33. By: Martins, Igor (African Economic History Network)
    Abstract: Few could have foreseen the consequences when the British Parliament, in 1807, passed the Slave Trade Act that sought to abolish slave imports into the British Empire. From population decreases in the British Caribbean to increased prices in the Cape Colony, historical evidence suggests that the effects of the Act were felt far and wide even though commercialization of slaves was still possible within colonial territories. Using newly digitized historical datasets covering more than 40 years in two different districts of the British Cape Colony, this paper measures changes in slave ownership and acquisition patterns from a longitudinal perspective. This approach allows me to tease out the effects of the Act on farmers with different types of agricultural outputs, most notably crop and livestock farming, agricultural types with very different labor demands. The results show that livestock farmers, surprisingly, were more inelastic to the import ban in comparison to crop farmers. These results suggest that slaveholders could extract rents from the enslaved in a multitude of ways beyond agriculture production and calls for a broader theory of slavery as capital investment.
    Keywords: Slavery; abolition; Cape Colony; economic history
    JEL: N01 N27 N37
    Date: 2019–02–04
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:hhs:afekhi:2019_043&r=all
  34. By: Dzever, D.D.; Ayoola, J.B.
    Abstract: This study analyzed the determinants ofrice importation in Nigeria (1991-2015). Data were collected from secondary sources, analyzed using vector error correction model, variance decomposition and impulse response. The result ~howed that inflation rate in the previous year and population in the previous year were the variables that significantly affected the importation of rice in the long run while rice output in the previous year was the only variable that significantly affected rice importation in the short ruri. It was therefore recommended that the Federal government should put in place policies to increase and improve on the quality of locally produced rice through agricultural credit, fertilizer distribution, packaging and marketing. Also the Federal Government should set up policies that will encourage investment through appropriate financing at reasonable interest rate so that agribusiness will be promoted, particularly in the rice sub-sector.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288329&r=all
  35. By: Ajibade T.B.; Ayinde O.E.; Abdoulaye T.; Ayinde, K.
    Abstract: With a contribution of up to 71 % to world output of yam, Nigeria remains the largest producing country with rural farmers having yam as second most commonly harvested tuber crop. Given its nutritional superiority to most roots and tubers in terms of digestible proteins and minerals and its relevance as a source of income for the poor majority of rural-farmers, the impo"rtance of yam in Nigeria cannot be overemphasized. There has however been a persistent price increasein yam, as well as other food· commodities, in Nigeria. This study was therefore designed to investigate the determinants of rising yam price in Nigeria over the period 1970-2015. The study relied on timeseries data sourced from FAOSTAT, Federal Bureau of Statistics and CBN Bulletin. Inferential statistics including unit-root test, cointegration and error correction model were employed in analysis. Autocorrelation was present in the model hence necessitating Cochrane-Orcutt approach. Results indicated that variables were non-stationary but became ·stationary after first differencing.At 5% signific.ance level, on the long run, price of yam was determined by annual production (coef.=- 0.8095), GDP (coef.=-3.009) and annual money supply (coef.=:0.829). It is consequently recommended that programmes and strategies implemented to boost food production in Nigeria should be carried on viz-a-viz robust economic planning that keeps the significant macroeconomic variables at optimal levels in order to maintain the balance required for stabilization in food commodity prices. Likewise, efforts should be concerted in putting insurgency in Nigeria under checks considering the ill effect it has on farming and trading activities.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries, Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288315&r=all
  36. By: Ogunbiyi, K.K.; Olajide, O.A.
    Keywords: Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288420&r=all
  37. By: I.T, Oyebamiji; M.O, Olatilewa; S.A, Adetayo; S.N, Oyewole
    Abstract: The study evaluated the economic appraisal of inert atmosphere silo used for wheat storage in Ilorin. NSPRI has developed inert atmosphere silo for storage of grains and this has successfully stored wheat among other grains for four year without quality deterioration, but the targeted stakeholders in grains postharvest value chain have not'been able to adopt the technology. Their fear is not far fetch from the uncertainty of how cost effective the technology will be. The study was conducted to appraise the economics of the technology for storage of wheat and other grains. Budgeting and profitability analytical techniques were used to analyze the data generated by the study. The study revealed that storage of wheat using inert atmosphere silo is highly profitable with a gross margin of H 5, 182,250.00. Lastly, Return per N aira from wheat grains storage using the silo is 0.44. The return on the investment almost hits 50 % of the financial commitment to the investment made on the Technology (Silo) for grains storage. To reduce postharvest grain losses and increase food security in the country, governments at all levels, Farmers' Association Stakeholders and grains merchants should work with NSPRI on the adoption of the technology.
    Keywords: Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288335&r=all
  38. By: Kartik Misra (Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst)
    Abstract: By providing 100 days of guaranteed employment to every rural household, the National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA) can challenge the hegemony of the landed elite as major employers in the Indian countryside and raise market wages which have long been depressed. This paper shows that the impact of NREGA is conditioned and complicated by historical inequalities in agricultural landownership which have persisted since the colonial period. I find that in the lean season of agriculture, the program is highly successful in raising wages and generating more public employment in districts that were not characterized by historically high levels of socio-economic inequality. In these districts, the increase in public employment crowds-out labor primarily from domestic work, reflected in increased women’s participation in the program. However, high inequality in landownership adversely impacts the bargaining power of workers and the enforcement of their entitlements under NREGA. This is most evident when I examine the impact of NREGA on rural wages. I find that in districts where land is concentrated in the hands of relatively few large landowners, private agricultural wages declined despite NREGA, whereas they remain largely unchanged in districts that have more equitable land distribution. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that NREGA has not become a credible alternative to private employment in regions with high land inequality.
    Keywords: India; NREGA; historical institutions; wage bargaining; monopsonistic labor markets
    JEL: O12 I38 J42 J43 P48
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ums:papers:2019-09&r=all
  39. By: Romina, Cavatassi; Athur, Mabiso; Mohamed, Abouaziza; Eric, Djimeu
    Abstract: Smallholder farmers in developing countries often lack appropriate cereal storage facilities which can contribute to food insecurity and low cereal commercialization, particularly when they can only rely on one cropping season with no irrigation. Lack of quality storage can lead to post-harvest losses (Abass et al, 2014; Sheahan and Barrett, 2017) and often compels smallholder farmers to sell their crops soon after harvest, when crop prices are at their seasonal lowest, only for them to buy grain for consumption during the lean season, when prices are high (Kadjo et al, 2018; Aggarwal et al, 2018; Stephens and Barrett, 2011). In many instances, such farmers need food assistance to survive the lean season and in other cases, they may have to borrow money at usurious rates in order to purchase food. This was the case in Guéra Region of Chad, a semi-arid area that frequently experiences droughts and dry spells in ways that severely reduce crop production and rural households’ food security. To address these issues, the IFAD-funded Programme d'Appui au Développement Rural dans le Guéra (PADER-G) project was implemented with the main objective of supporting poor rural households and smallholder farmers in Guéra, Chad to improve their food security and livelihoods. One specific aim of PADER-G, designed to manage risks of food shortage, was to improve cereal storage among smallholder farmers through the construction of community cereal banks (banque de céréales). This main element of the project was complemented with the establishment of community committees (Comité de gestion des banques de soudure – COGES) which were trained on effective management of the cereal banks.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288458&r=all
  40. By: Thompson, O.A.; Amos, T.T.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288429&r=all
  41. By: Fapojuwo, O.E.; Shittu, A.M.; Ogunnaike, M.G.; Kehinde, M.O.; Oyawole, F.P.; Akisanya, L.T.
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288427&r=all
  42. By: Abdel Fawaz Osseni; François Bareille; Pierre Dupraz
    Abstract: Agricultural activities jointly generate various externalities. Hedonic pricing method allows for their valuation. Previous hedonic studies have estimated the value of the externalities generated by a given agricultural activity in a single parameter. Based on simple theoretical model, we illustrate that this parameter captures the sum of the different externalities generated by the activity. We explain that this parameter can differ at different spatial scale. Using specific spatial econometric models with spatial lags on the explanatory variables, we distinguish between the value of infra-municipal agricultural externalities and the value of extra-municipal agricultural externalities with larger spatial range arising from the same agricultural source. Among the estimated models, the spatial lag of the exogenous variable and the general nested spatial models are selected as the best models. We find that swine activities present negative effects at all scales whereas dairy cattle activities, including grassland management, present negative effects at the infra-municipality scale but positive spillovers.
    Keywords: externalities, nitrogen, agriculture, spatial econometric
    JEL: Q51 Q53 H41
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:rae:wpaper:201904&r=all
  43. By: Oduntan, O.; Oluyide, O.G.; Aderinola, E.A.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288508&r=all
  44. By: Fato, B.F.; Oyegbami, A.; Nwali, C.S.; Obute, J.E.
    Abstract: Despite the importance of agribusiness in the development process, the sectors face rangeof prqblems and as such this study analyzed the factors affecting agribusiness in Oyo Sfate, Nigeria and specifically: (i) described the socio-economic characteristics of the respondents, (ii) identified the types of agribusiness the respondents are involved, (iii) examined _the level of accessibility to inputs for the various agribusiness and (iv) examined the factors affecting agribusiness in the study area. 1\ multi stage sampling procedure was used to select two local government areas _out of which 120 agribusiness owners were randomly sampled. The mean age of the respondents was 52ye~rs while 52.5 % of the respondents were males with average annual . income of "203,000. The· different agribusiness carried out in the area include crop farming, livestock farming, crop processing, production oflivestock feed, marketing of farm produce among others. Factors affecting agribusiness in the area were found to include insufficient fund, insufficient land, high cost of e_quipment, transportation problem, pest and diseases, high cost of production, and price' fluctuatton of agricultural produce. The chi-square result showed that there were significant relationships between marital status (x2 =28.02, P<0.05), education (x2=61.25, P<0.05) of agribusiness owners and the factors affecting their agribusiness in the study area. Also, Pearson correlation result showed that there were significant relationship between respondent's age (r=0.665, P<0.00£), years offarming experiertce (r=0.243, P<0.05) and the factors affecting their agribusiness involvements. in the study area. The study recommends that the respondents should be encouraged to go into other. types of agribusiness. apart-from-crop farming _in the study area. Also, government should cnc:ourage respondents by making fund available and accessible as loan to respondents sin-:c one or:themajor factors affecting agribusiness is insufficient fund.
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288311&r=all
  45. By: Akinyemi, S.O.S; Adebisi-Adelani, O.; Layade, A.A.; Adegbite, O.; Arogundade, O.; Fajinmi, O.B.; Kumar, L.
    Keywords: Production Economics
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288417&r=all
  46. By: Thiep Do; Nhung Thi
    Abstract: This paper aims to evaluate the impact of accessing agricultural extension on households’ agricultural profit. Results from pooled cross-sectional data show that each additional time of access is associated with a 15.5 per cent increase in agricultural profit.However, this relation is not linear and if it exceeds 6 times, it will eventually cause more harm than good. We also construct a household and time-fixed effect model to eliminate the effect of unobserved factors.The local extension service impact on agricultural profit is 15.2 per cent for 2010–12; 19.8 per cent for 2012–14 and 25.5 per cent for 2014–16.
    Keywords: Agriculture,Agricultural extension,Fixed effects
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2018-104&r=all
  47. By: Sanusi, M.M.; Oyedeji, O.O.; Akerele, D.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288433&r=all
  48. By: Laschewski, Lutz; Tietz, Andreas; Zavyalova, Ekaterina
    Abstract: Agricultural economics and policy planning make use of – and rely on – agricultural statistics. Individual agricultural firms, as they are represented in statistical systems, are usually treated as independent economic decision-makers. Our paper is investigating the impacts of holding structures on statistical and economic parameters. Therefore, the paper will draw on empirical evidence which was generated in a local case study in seven communities in the Northeast of Germany. It is argued that cross-regional investors systematically ’assemble‘ agriholdings based on their overall business strategy. If large holding structures exist, the individual business perspective may create a flawed representation of farm structures.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–03–01
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288437&r=all
  49. By: Aslihan, Arslan; Daniel, Higgins; Saiful, Islam
    Abstract: The Coastal Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (CCRIP) is a $150 million rural infrastructure project which was implemented in 12 districts of Bangladesh since 2013, and is due to be completed by the end of 2019. The project is funded by IFAD, the ADB, KfW of Germany, and the Government of Bangladesh. The project aims to improve the connectivity of farms and households in the face of climatic shocks, focusing on one of the most shock-prone areas of one of the most shock-prone countries in the world. The main component of the project is the construction of improved markets and market connecting roads, that are designed to remain useable during the monsoon season. This is expected to improve sales of on-farm produce, along with access to inputs as well as opportunities for off-farm income generation, leading to increased productivity and income. The project also aims to improve women's empowerment by employing Labour Contracting Societies (LCS), consisting mainly of destitute women, to carry out some of the construction work. This impact assessment focuses on the activities funded by IFAD, which includes the strengthening of markets and roads at the community and village levels. Using data from an in-depth household questionnaire covering 3,000 treatment and control households, combined with extensive qualitative interviews, we analyse the project's impact on a range of impact indicators relating to income; crop, fish and livestock production and sales; assets, food security and education; financial inclusion; and women's empowerment. We assess impact on the whole sample, as well as for a range of sub-groups, including by geographic location, location within the market catchment area, and by livelihood activity, integrating findings from the qualitative data to help to explain the mechanisms that shaped the project's impact. Regarding on-farm activities, we find that, despite a lack of impact on productivity, income from selling crops and fish increased significantly (by 104 and 50 per cent, respectively). However, we do not find a similar increase in income from the sale of livestock and livestock products. The lack of impact on productivity was seemingly caused by persisting issues with accessing high-quality inputs during the monsoon season, as well as households having limited capital to purchase these inputs. Despite this, the project increased the amount of produce that was sold, the amount that was sold at a market rather than from home or the farm gate, and increased the likelihood of growing cash crops, leading to the large increase in on-farm income. As well as improving on-farm income, the project also increased income from wage labour, which together produced a positive impact on total income of 11 per cent, along with a four per cent reduction in poverty. This increased prosperity was also reflected in reduced food insecurity and increased ownership of households assets.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy, Community/Rural/Urban Development, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288465&r=all
  50. By: Ewen Gallic (Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS, EHESS, Centrale Marseille, AMSE); Gauthier Vermandel (Paris-Dauphine and PSL Research Universities & France Stratégie, Services du Premier Ministre)
    Abstract: How much do weather shocks matter? The literature addresses this question in two isolated ways: either by looking at long-term effects through the prism of theoretical models, or by focusing on short-term effects using empirical analysis. We propose a framework to bring together both the short and long-term effects through the lens of an estimated DSGE model with a weather-dependent agricultural sector. The model is estimated using Bayesian methods and quarterly data for New Zealand using the weather as an observable variable. In the short-run, our analysis underlines the key role of weather as a driver of business cycles over the sample period. An adverse weather shock generates a recession, boosts the non-agricultural sector and entails a domestic currency depreciation. Taking a long-term perspective, a welfare analysis reveals that weather shocks are not a free lunch: the welfare cost of weather is currently estimated at 0.19% of permanent consumption. Climate change critically increases the variability of key macroeconomic variables (such as GDP, agricultural output or the real exchange rate) resulting in a higher welfare cost peaking to 0.29% in the worst case scenario.
    Keywords: agriculture, business cycles, climate change, weather shocks
    JEL: C13 E32 Q54
    Date: 2019–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1915&r=all
  51. By: Cahen-Fourot, Louison
    Abstract: This paper analyses the socio-economic context into which environmental policies and ecological sentiments emerge through empirically studying the relation to the environment of different kinds of capitalism. The association and interaction of the relation to the environment with other key social relations, e.g. the labour-capital relations, are studied and discussed. To achieve this, I draw from Regulation Theory and augment its analytical framework with an explicit environmental dimension. I then conduct an empirical analysis of the diversity of contemporary capitalism including the social relation to the environment for a sample of thirty-seven OECD and BRICS countries. Five kinds of capitalism are identified: the Northern-continental European, the Southern-central European, the Anglo-Saxon and Pacific, the Emerging Countries and the Two Giants. A main result is the correspondence between ecology-prone social relations to the environment, labour oriented capital-labour relations and welfare-oriented states. However, the results show that countries that are the most ecology-prone are also the ones that have the most relocated their environmental impact, an observation consistent with the critical literature on the Environmental Kuznets Curve.
    Keywords: Society-environment relation; Capitalism; Mode of regulation; Institution; Environmental policy; Ecological macroeconomics
    Date: 2019
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:wiw:wus045:6957&r=all
  52. By: Tasie, C.M.; Wilcox, G.I.
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288432&r=all
  53. By: Chiemela, Stella Nwawulu; Chiemela, Chinedum Jachinma; Chiebonam, Onyia Chukwuemeka; Mgbebu, Ezekiel Sunday
    Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288430&r=all
  54. By: Alawode, Ramatallah Adenike
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288428&r=all
  55. By: Ekpa, Daniel; Akinyemi, Mudashiru; Ibrahim, Hassan Ishaq
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288425&r=all
  56. By: Kuye, O.O.; Ettah, O.I.; Oniah, M.O.; Egbe, B.M.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288504&r=all
  57. By: A.E, Sodeeq; O.F, Ashaolu; A.G, Ibrahim; L.O, Lamidi; M.B, Salawu; S.D, Idowu; B.T, Ogunleye
    Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288336&r=all
  58. By: Ng, Horlick; Ker, Alan P.
    Abstract: Feeding nine billion people by 2050, yield resiliency, climate change, and remaining economically competitive have received significant attention within both the literature and populous. Technological change in agriculture will largely dictate our ability to meet these challenges. Although there is significant literature on technological change in U.S. crop yields, very little has been done with Canadian yields. Moreover, the adoption and effect of various technologies and their interaction with climate tend to be crop-region specific. To this end, we model technological change in county-level yields for barley, canola, corn, oats, soybean and wheat in Canada. We use mixtures to allow and test for heterogeneous rates of technological change within the yield data generating process. While we tend to find increasing but heterogeneous rates of technological change, increasing and asymmetric yield volatility, and, increasing absolute but decreasing relative yield resiliency, our results do differ across crops and exhibit spatial bifurcations within a crop. Using a standard attribution model we find changing climate has differing effects across crops. We also consider the public funding implications of technological change for Canadian Business Risk Management programs.
    Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2019–05–16
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:uguiwp:288511&r=all
  59. By: Tavrov, Dan; Nivievskyi, Oleg
    Abstract: Land markets all over the world are diversely regulated, although a vast stock of empirical literature seems to suggest that unrestricted land market is the best policy design option. Since diversity of regulations proves this unlikely, it is surprising that little attention is paid in academic literature to theory that would allow to choose land market design based on welfare implications of various restrictions. In this paper, we build upon the framework described in the literature and develop a theoretical model that enables to infer an optimal choice of (maximum land holdings) restrictions in the presence of land market imperfections.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2019–05–09
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:eaa165:288446&r=all
  60. By: Stefano Gagliarducci; M. Daniele Paserman; Eleonora Patacchini
    Abstract: This paper studies how politicians and voters respond to new information on the threats of climate change. Using data on the universe of federal disaster declarations between 1989 and 2014, we document that congress members from districts hit by a hurricane are more likely to support bills promoting more environmental regulation and control in the year after the disaster. The response to hurricanes does not seem to be driven by logrolling behavior or lobbysts' pressure. The change in legislative agenda is persistent over time, and it is associated with an electoral penalty in the following elections. The response is mainly promoted by representatives in safe districts, those with more experience, and those with strong pro-environment records. Our evidence thus reveals that natural disasters may trigger a permanent change in politicians' beliefs, but only those with a sufficient electoral strength or with strong ideologies are willing to engage in promoting policies with short-run costs and long-run benefits.
    JEL: D70 D72 H50 Q54
    Date: 2019–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25835&r=all
  61. By: Romina, Cavatassi; Federica, Alfani; Adriana, Paolantonio; Paola, Mallia
    Abstract: The territory of Mexico is covered by forests and wildland up to about 73% of the total territory (World Bank, 2015 and CONAFOR, 2012). This corresponds to around 140 million hectares, 80% of which are owned by communities and ejidos. Starting from the '80s, Mexico has experienced one of the largest deforestation rates in Latin America due to a number of complex socio-economic and political reasons which have reduced incentives to the sustainable use of forests with negative consequences for their long term conservation (Segura, 2000). To address and overcome problems linked to deforestation and forest degradation, the Community-based Forestry Development Project in Southern States (Desarrollo Comunitario Forestal en los Estados del Sur – DECOFOS) was designed and implemented from March 2011 to September 2016 with contribution from the Government of Mexico, IFAD, the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and project beneficiaries. The project had two main components. The first component was mainly meant to raise awareness of climate change and of sustainable use and management of natural resources through trainings and capacity development. This component could be instrumental to achieving impacts when combined with the second component which had a more tangible connotation. The second component, indeed, consisted on promoting sustainable management and exploitation of forest and natural resources through reforestation, adoption of agroforestry and of good environmental practices, supporting and facilitating business enterprises through the provision of technical and financial support to the start-up of micro-entrepreneurial projects and small-businesses enterprises.
    Keywords: Agricultural Finance, Environmental Economics and Policy
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288451&r=all
  62. By: Nwali, Nte I.; Okoro, Frank N.
    Keywords: Demand and Price Analysis
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288426&r=all
  63. By: A., Obisesan Adekemi; A., Olasoji Oluwaseyi
    Abstract: Information on consumers' preference plays a key role in food industry development and offers new opportunities in agribusiness. The study examined the consumers' preference for honey and its attributes in Ibadan North Local Government Area of Oyo State, Nigeria. Primary data were collected from 100 respondents with the aid of a well-structured questionnaire using multi-stage sampling procedure. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Probit regression model. The mean age and household size of the respondents were 38 years and 5 persons respectively. Seventy-five percent of the respondents were aware of the health benefits of hone:, and consumed honey. Majority (93.2%) of the consumers preferred honey to other sweeteners with local honey being commonly consumed. Supermarkets and local markets were the common points of purchase. The preferred attributes considered in the purchase of honey were: quality of honey. packaging, labeling and price. Household size, health benefit awareness and quality significantly influenced consumers' preference for honey. The study recommends that local honey processors and distributors should improve on the quality, packaging and labeling of honey in Nigeria.
    Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics, Crop Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288346&r=all
  64. By: Ahungwa, G. T.; Mamman, B. Y.; Adeleke, E. A.
    Abstract: No household that faces the dilemma of food shortage sit back in despair to allow the problem fester, but deploy various alternatives to combat food shortages. Such mechanisms are termed coping strategies - ranging from food-acquiring activities to change in eating behaviour or short term measures to long term mechanisms. The administration of these strategies is a sure indication that there is food security challenge and the coping strategies adopted defined the severity, type and the duration of food stress. This paper reviewed the coping strategies and objectively assesses their impact on the food security status of the region. Ravaged by the incidences of Boko Haram and communal crises, the northern region as a whole has got her share of induced poor food security situation that have manifested in the reduction in food production, wide spread hunger and malnutrition in some parts of the region. The coping strategies deployed include overt reliance on less preferred and less expensive foods, borrowing or reliance on help from friends or relatives (with PCS scores of 2), limiting the portion size at mealtimes, rationing adult meals and reduction in the number of meals eaten in a day (PCS score 3). These strategies indicate that the households in the regions as a whole deploy more often, less severe coping strategies, implying that food security crisis could be easily reversed if appropriate interventions such as increased support to agricultural sector via input support and improved security apparatus are put in place.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288317&r=all
  65. By: Robert Czudaj (Department of Economics, Chemnitz University of Technology)
    Abstract: The dynamics between trading volume and volatility for seven agricultural futures markets are examined by drawing on the large literature for equity markets and by allowing for heterogeneity of investors beliefs proxied by open interest. In addition, time-varying effects on the transmission mechanism of shocks are also accounted for by implementing a Bayesian VAR model, which allows for time-variation stemming from both the coefficients and the variance covariance structure of the model’s disturbances. This is important since it accounts for changes in the number of trades and the size of trades across different periods, which can have different effects on the volatility-volume relation. The results show that the Granger causality and the reaction to shocks varies substantially over time. This highlights the importance to allow for time-variation when modeling the relationship between volatility, trading volume and open interest for agricultural futures markets. In general, the ï¬ ndings indicate that volatility of agricultural futures markets is driven by previous period’s trading volume and open interest. However, the reversed relationship from lagged volatility to trading volume and open interest is limited to certain periods of time.
    Keywords: Agricultural futures markets, open interest, time-varying Bayesian VAR, trading volume, volatility
    JEL: C32 G13 Q14
    Date: 2019–05
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:tch:wpaper:cep030&r=all
  66. By: Tijani, I.A.; Alawode, O.O.; Fawehinmi, o.O.; Gafar, A.O; Kolade, O.A.
    Abstract: Thi~ paper aims at highlighting the peculiarity of agribusiness to economic growth and development. It comprehensively examines factors (policies and regulations) that hinder and or aids agribusiness development. This exercise will help put into perspective factors that are relevant for specific stages of agribusiness and agro-industrial development, via the creation of an enabling environment, by examining and identifying policies, and regulations that have bearing on agribusiness. The paper equally aims at promoting investments in agro-enterprises and agro-based value chain development.
    Keywords: Agribusiness, Agricultural and Food Policy
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288323&r=all
  67. By: Coker, Ayodeji Alexander Ajibola; Molokwu, Christopher C.; Odoemena, Benjamin C.; Tuedogheye, Jeremiah G.; Elega, Julius O.
    Abstract: The issues of youth unemployment, inequality, poverty, economic recession and associated anti- · social activities are critical challenges currently limiting the development of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. This study therefore assessed the various cassava agribusiness value chain nodes in the Region, with the view to ascertaining their returns on investment and propensity for attracting the pool of unemployed youths and women into agribusiness and uplifting their livelihoods. Evidence from the study suggests that cassava enterprises, particularly processing, is most promising to attract the youths and women into agribusiness, given its high returns on investment. It thus becomes imperative that cassava enterprises be incorporated into on-going and proposed development interventions of the private sector, government and development partners, with a view to actualising the policy objective of women and youth empowerment in the country, and in particular, the Niger Delta Region, as detailed in the Agricultural Promotion Policy and the Economic and Growth Recovery Plan. The study further recommends that the cassava value chain enterprises should be deployed as focal commodities for the proposed agribusiness incubation centres and the agroindustrial parks, with a view to causing entrepreneurs empowerment and national output, while serving as antidote to economic recession.
    Keywords: Agribusiness
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288306&r=all
  68. By: Bcn-Chendo, G.N.; Obasi P.C.; Osuji, M.N.; Nwosu, F.O.; Emenyonu, C.A.; lbcagwa, B.O.; Uhuegbulem, I.J.
    Keywords: Labor and Human Capital, Livestock Production/Industries
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288363&r=all
  69. By: Adriana, Paolantonio; Romina, Cavatassi; Kristen, McCollum
    Abstract: Over half of the rural population in Bolivia today live below the national poverty line. As agriculture represents the main source of livelihood for more than 75 per cent of this rural population, supporting the livelihoods of rural farming households is key to tackling extreme poverty in the country. In August 2011, implementation began on the project Plan VIDA-PEEP (PPV), an initiative financed jointly between IFAD and the Bolivian Government as part of the country's National Development Plan. It aimed to improve the livelihoods of households residing in vulnerable municipalities in the departments of Potosi and Cochabamba through capacity building, financing of rural development projects, and supporting citizenship and social inclusion. The project lasted five years in total and was completed in December, 2016. Plan VIDA was implemented in 8 municipalities in the southern part of Cochabamba department, and in 14 municipalities in the northern area of the Potosí department. The current impact assessment examines the effectiveness of one component of the Plan VIDA project. Under this component, the project provided financial resources to communities for the implementation of rural development projects and to municipalities for the realization of production infrastructure projects. In particular, the evaluation focuses on a specific category of projects – Community Based Productive Investments (Proyectos Inter Comunales - PICs) – which account for more than 90 per cent of total beneficiary households reached by Plan VIDA The interventions financed are chosen among a set of community-developed proposals and are therefore of a participatory and collective nature. Nonetheless, about 80 per cent of interventions provided involved distribution of new locally adapted (criollo) or improved livestock breeds to individual households. Thus, the project offers a unique research opportunity to assess both its community-based development approach and the effectiveness of its livestock inputs. This impact assessment investigates whether the Plan VIDA project contributes to well-being of beneficiaries measured through key outcome indicators of economic mobility, resilience and nutrition to respond to IFAD's strategic objectives and goals and to Bolivia's National Development Plan. To answer these questions, this ex-post evaluation applies a mixed-methods approach that combines non-experimental statistical methods and qualitative analysis to compare a sample of project beneficiaries to non-participants.
    Keywords: Community/Rural/Urban Development, Crop Production/Industries, Food Security and Poverty
    Date: 2018
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:unadia:288464&r=all
  70. By: Bwala, Madu Ali; Tiamiyu, S.A.; Adedeji, S.; Kolo, Alhaji Y.
    Keywords: Land Economics/Use
    Date: 2017–10
    URL: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:ags:naae17:288418&r=all

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